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  1. History The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The original clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them. There have been applications for it to be converted to accommodation, but all plans have been refused so far. Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building. Construction of the original silos in 1903 Explore After a little trouble getting through customs, I was here 3 hours after first stepping foot on Canadian soil. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying. Sadly my experience with customs was more costly than I initially thought. After guiding me to a search room, they tipped the contents of my rucksack out and my lens got damaged. £150 for the repair, and they had loads of questions regarding the contents of my luggage. *Note to self, don't take waders next time*. After an hour and a half, I was on the bus to my friend's apartment. This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners. The local explorers have done an admirable job making this their own. They've cleared areas for social events, clear walkways for people to get around safely and have added features, like a wood burner and a bar. Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) Cheers for Looking
  2. Visited with Host Weve done a few sites over the last two years but these maltings gave us the creeps there was an uneasiness about this explore i wont be paying it a second visit.For an epic history please click the link below cheers http://www.beeston-notts.co.uk/bunning.shtml 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Thanks for looking [email protected]@l.....
  3. The Explore Visited with Urbexbandoned We decided to do some local Lincolnshire stuff one weekend a few months ago. I was glad to re-visit this place to see some of the bits that I hadn't seen on previous visits. Turned out to be well worth the visit as the first of the eight large buildings that had been been previously sealed turned out to be one of my favourite parts to photograph and was good to see some other little bits like the top of the tower, which i missed last time as the little wooden door at the top of the spiral staircase had been nailed shut. No sign of the remote secca and in and out unnoticed which is how i like it The History (Stolen from myself) The years of beer Designed specifically to facilitate three key stages in the production of beer, the Sleaford Bass Maltings represent both a practical and architecturally pleasing group of buildings. Covering a geographical area of just over 13 acres, and comprising some 500,000 sq ft of floor space, the Sleaford Bass Maltings cost around £350,000 to complete. Standing against a backdrop of flat landscape, this impressive complex can be seen for many miles, its eight massive malt houses, central water tower, and tall chimney dominating the skyline. Production was under way in September 1906 and fully operational by the following year. Throughout the first half of the 20th century production continued at a pace but, by the end of the Second World War, had declined to such an extent that many of the buildings had become redundant. While other trades rented some of the unused space, the malt industry continued to decline until, in 1959, production finally ceased. Just a random fact... "In addition to their wages, workers were given three free pints a day!", If only I was born 50 years earlier.... Chicken and Veg In 1973 the Sleaford Bass Maltings were purchased by a local firm, GW Padley (Property) Ltd who utilised it for chicken rearing and vegetable processing, but the chicken rearing came to end during the 1990s when approval was given for residential development of adjacent land. The Blaze Considered to be of special architectural and historical interest, the Sleaford Bass Maltings were Grade II listed in 1974, only to suffer considerable damage two years later when a severe fire spread through the central area. Found this warning too on english heritage... NB Please note that this site is not currently open to the public. Tours are sometimes arranged by the Sleaford Maltings Group for heritage open days and other similar events.... The Pictures 1. Phone pano... 2. 3. 4/5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Urbexbandoned getting the shot... 14/15. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  4. The History, shamelessly ripped from Wiki The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 & 1907 to Herbert A Coachman's design, the Maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England. They have been designated grade II on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "Particularly important.......of more than special interest". Part of the predominantly agricultural county of Lincolnshire, The Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880's. When germinated & dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of the Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left, & a fire in 1976 caused sever damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990's, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail & residential space were put on hold in early 2015, after lengthy delays in planning permission & the withdrawal of a major investor. The Explore We arrived at our car drop off point after what seemed like a never ending car journey, having travelled all the way from South East London. Feeling rather foggy in the head I cracked open a can of chemical waste & we got kitted up. We made our way over to the most obvious entry point, as it was still early & the chances of being seen were pretty slim. After seeing an abundance of palisade around we decided that this wasn’t going to be our way in, & quickly consulted our maps for an alternative. I had noticed some rather telling signs of entry from my consultation with Google the previous night, & so we figured a way to get to that side instead. Navigation was made difficult by the fact that there was a thick blanket of fog surrounding the whole town & it didn't seem to be lifting. Eventually we were on the right course, & things started to make more sense. On our travels we passed an old woman walking her dogs, we stopped & said hello. She asked what we were looking for, to which we turned to each other & I replied “We’re going to have a look at Bass Maltings, do you know the way from here?”. She obliged but gave us a heads up that you can’t get in. We grinned at each other & said “we know”. It was rather amusing! Our entry point after this was pretty straight forward, having to negotiate our way around some piss poor attempts to plug up gaps in the fence……...I mean come on! This was lackluster to say the least!! We got ourselves into the end building, & on first inspection it seemed pretty bare & dull. We made our way up to the first floor, which is where it started to get a bit more interesting. There were lots of fine architectural details, like ornate cast pillars & exposed wooden beams. The heady mix of fog, strong dawn sunlight & soft ambient light made for some difficult but rewarding conditions (as you can see from the light shaft photos). We made our way up the floor levels, with each ascension being more precarious than the last. The buildings have over time, suffered some quite severe water damage in places, so we had to tread carefully. Eventually we made our way down & tried to get into the other buildings. Entry to the other 7 malt houses was tough, with every ginnel being blocked off by tall gates & barbed wire. We had to basically weave our way through, finding openings from one building to the next. This only got us so far, & we then came to a dead end. After a bit of creative thinking & I figured out a weakness in one of the gates, & used some brute force to get my way over the top of it. I was very cautious at this point, because I was now in plain view of the neighbouring housing estate. I went off to scout out the way, leaving Scarlet behind. After I did a number on one of the gates further down, I came back & gave her the green light. We then quietly (well as quietly as we could) made our way up & over. We were now close to our main goal, which was the water tower. After fighting through some rather thick foliage we were at the front door. To our disappointment it wasn’t quite the walk in that we had seen from the videos. The door was blocked, with only a gap at the top of it. Someone had kindly left something to stand on, which made things a bit easier. Unfortunately Scarlet wasn’t able to make it up there, despite my attempts to help. She told me to go alone, as she knew that I was really looking forward to seeing it. I carefully made my way over the top, & as soon as I got down the other side, I turned around & there it was…….that staircase. It was even more beautiful than I had seen in the pictures, & it was made even better with the shafts of light that were pouring in from the side window. I took a moment to absorb the atmosphere, then I proceeded to climb the spiral stairs. Being on my own at this point, & doing something which was quite precarious, my nerves started to set in. This only got worse when I saw the upper stairways that I had to climb. They were all wood, & as I stepped on them they began to creak like hell. I was holding on to a banister that was also made of wood, knowing that if these steps gave way it would offer me no protection whatsoever. I will admit that I was pretty scared at that point. I got to the top level, & carefully made my way onto the metal gantry to the port hole ladder. I assessed the size of the opening & realised that I would need to leave my bag & tripod behind, as the space was very tight. I made my way up through the long tube (which I found out later was the centre of the water tank, thanks Maniac). I arrived to an open port hole at the top, & was presented with a truly spectacular view. From this high vantage point you could literally see for miles, & with the sun beaming down it made for a perfect setting. I knew that at this point I was very exposed, with potentially the whole town being able to see me. But to be quite frank I couldn’t give a shit, I knew it was one of those special moments which had to be savoured. I sat around for a little while, taking it all in before I made my way back down. By this time it was getting on & we needed to make tracks, knowing that it would probably take another 4+ hours to get home. We retraced our steps through the fields in the calm sunset & reflected on what had been a very fruitful explore. Explorer credits also go to my Mrs & partner in crime Vixxie. The pics, sorry there are so many
  5. History This place was built between 1901 and 1906 for the sole purpose of facilitating three key stages in the beer making process. The site was originally purchased by Bass Ratcliff & Greeton Ltd in 1901 and plans for the huge site were prepared by Mr H A Couchman who had prepared designs for various other Bass projects. The site itself comprises of approximately 500,000 sq ft of floorspace and cost at the time roughly £350,000 to construct. The main construction comprises of 8 huge malt houses, a large central water tower close to a tall chimney and the engine houses plus a few smaller ancillary buildings. Considered to be of special architectural and historical interest, the Sleaford Bass Malting’s were Grade II listed in 1974. only two years later a severe fire spread through the central area which suffered considerable damage. Despite the intensity of the blaze, the structural integrity of the majority of the buildings remained intact due to the quality of the original construction, and this fact probably played a key role in saving the building from demolition when an application was made in 1982. In 2011 it was announced that the site which had been previously placed on the ‘at risk’ registry maintained by the English Heritage, had now become a national priority. Plans which were announced to develop the site into mixed housing, offices and apartments have currently been stalled by Local Sleaford Council decisions not to sell off land which would lead to a new road being build to allow better access for a proposed new Tesco store. No doubt after tougher negotiations take place the sale of the land will go through and the area will be redeveloped. It will be positive to see these buildings put back into use. Photo's.... Thanks for looking
  6. Went back for another look with FatPanda, Raz & Jord Hopefully i've got some new interesting shots and not the same old same old! Bit of History; The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass Brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 and 1907 to Herbert A. Couchman's design, the maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England; they have been designated Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "particularly important ... of more than special interest." Part of the predominately agricultural county of Lincolnshire, the Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880s. When germinated and dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left and a fire in 1976 caused severe damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990s, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail and residential space were put on hold in early 2015 after lengthy delays over planning permission and the withdrawal of a major investor. Few more For those who care heres a vdeo walkaround i spent quite some time making; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9746-Sleaford-Bass-Maltings-Walkaround Thanks for looking
  7. Went for a revisit to an old favourite at the weekend - only took about 10 pics but i made a lengthy video Press HD - Enjoy Thanks for looking
  8. History The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass Brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 and 1907 to Herbert A. Couchman's design, the maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England; they have been designated Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "particularly important ... of more than special interest." Part of the predominately agricultural county of Lincolnshire, the Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880s. When germinated and dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left and a fire in 1976 caused severe damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990s, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail and residential space were put on hold in early 2015 after lengthy delays over planning permission and the withdrawal of a major investor Explore Ventured down with Hamtagger. HT had been before so all I had seen was in pictures and videos. I liked what I saw though on the approach, nice red brick buildings which now looked very out of place next to a housing estate. The walkways between the malt houses are something I was drawn to, I quite liked them, timber build connected to that lovely red brick. A few of the roofs had gone due to past fires but it was nice all the same. We got up close and on arrival noticed there was another couple of people there, they certainly weren’t dressed for exploring but it appeared they were there for the same reason we were. Anyhow, soon found entry to the building and the first building was the one I liked the most. After mooching around and playing with dead animals (HT), We headed out to see the rest. Had quite a good look around and then we were going to try and see the staircase, just literally climbing over when the guy we had seen earlier shouted over to us that it was all sealed. I mean, exploring.. meant to be quiet… and all of a sudden someone shouts quite loud about an area being sealed up….. When we walked back to the fence I spotted a gap adjacent to the wall, I had the pleasure in getting through, it wasn’t easy. Chest a bit too big but with a little squeeze I was through and then watched HT climb over Anyway, it wasn’t sealed as you can see from my pics and I really enjoyed this place. It has it’s fair share of pigeon shit which I had the pleasure of laying down in just to get that picture. Anyway, on with the pics. 1 – I like it, reminds me of minature houses. 2 – The machinery in the tower, powered by Pigeon shit 3 – Gotta have a selfie right.. 4 – That spiral staircase 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Thanks for looking!
  9. Explored with Raz & 2 non members Background; The Bass Maltings in Sleaford, England are a large disused group of eight malt houses originally owned by the Bass Brewery of Burton upon Trent. Constructed between 1901 and 1907 to Herbert A. Couchman's design, the maltings are the largest group of malt houses in England; they have been designated Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England, recognising them as "particularly important ... of more than special interest." Part of the predominately agricultural county of Lincolnshire, the Sleaford area was a major producer of barley in the 1880s. When germinated and dried to form malt, barley forms a key ingredient in the production of beer. Along with the town's railway links, this attracted the Bass brewery company to the town. The use of more efficient techniques at Bass's other plant led to the closure of Sleaford's maltings in 1959. Despite being used to rear poultry in the late 20th century, the buildings have not been fully occupied since Bass left and a fire in 1976 caused severe damage to three of the malthouses. Derelict since the 1990s, proposals to convert the buildings into office, retail and residential space were put on hold in early 2015 after lengthy delays over planning permission and the withdrawal of a major investor. The Explore Some proper good fun, as you near the maltings you cant exactly miss it. i'd go as far as to say it dominates the relitively flat lincolnshire landscape. once your in your greeted by some really quite pleasing mill style rooms with a view and a half from the top. Only way from one building to another is using some rotten old walk ways situated pretty damn high up! these walk ways run from one end of the row to the other so you can cross it easy, providing you have the nerve! The central building has to be the best with its impressive spiral stair case! If you got this far, thanks for reading
  10. Final site from mine and Landie's roadtrip, after a few disappointing fails we waved goodbye to Sheffield and after a brief bit of googling found this place so decided to pop in for a look on the way home. A small site but a lovely one at that! Sadly half demolished now, and the buildings left are going to be converted soon. Still, it made a real nice positive end to the trip after the previous fails, on a beautiful May evening with the sounds of a pub band playing next door and some lovely sunshine as well. More here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157644138189287/
  11. Sleaford Bass Maltings One of those days when you find yourself with exploration withdrawal symptoms and it's too late to find a partner in grime. So I decided to take the short drive to sleaford solo to check out this huge complex. I was "going in dry" so to speak, with only some google maps printouts, a ginsters pasty, a scotch egg, and a determined mind. A little bit of fog helped maintain ninja infiltration, a mental note was made to add kevlar shreddies to my kit. For those of you that have been here before, you'll know that it's a bit of a ball-ache (literally) due to the fact that each of the eight massive buildings are sectioned off from each other resulting in a lot of climbing in and out mid-explore. Despite this, I thoroughly enjoyed having a mooch around here for about 5 hours, the spiral staircase room and the tower above is obviously one of the main attractions, and the upper floors of the fire damaged buildings require the use of your little ballerina shoes The history The years of beer Designed specifically to facilitate three key stages in the production of beer, the Sleaford Bass Maltings represent both a practical and architecturally pleasing group of buildings. Covering a geographical area of just over 13 acres, and comprising some 500,000 sq ft of floor space, the Sleaford Bass Maltings cost around £350,000 to complete. Standing against a backdrop of flat landscape, this impressive complex can be seen for many miles, its eight massive malt houses, central water tower, and tall chimney dominating the skyline. Production was under way in September 1906 and fully operational by the following year. Throughout the first half of the 20th century production continued at a pace but, by the end of the Second World War, had declined to such an extent that many of the buildings had become redundant. While other trades rented some of the unused space, the malt industry continued to decline until, in 1959, production finally ceased. Chicken and Veg In 1973 the Sleaford Bass Maltings were purchased by a local firm, GW Padley (Property) Ltd who utilised it for chicken rearing and vegetable processing, but the chicken rearing came to end during the 1990s when approval was given for residential development of adjacent land. The Blaze Considered to be of special architectural and historical interest, the Sleaford Bass Maltings were Grade II listed in 1974, only to suffer considerable damage two years later when a severe fire spread through the central area. Found this warning too on english heritage... “NB Please note that this site is not currently open to the public. Tours are sometimes arranged by the Sleaford Maltings Group for heritage open days and other similar eventsÂâ€..... 1. 2. External taken on a previous recce 3. Double Negative 4. Malt room reflections 5. 6. Stairing downwards 7. Spiral tap 8. 9. Windows, very nice ones.. 10. 11. Looking back from the spiral stairs 12. Above those stairs 13. One of the many death defying adjoining walkways 14. Looking up.. After not having my camera out of the bag for over 4 months for various reasons, I made a revisit with Session9 in November to try to get back into it. We had a quick mooch around a couple of the main buildings and the central area. Most of my pics turned out cack, but i managed to pick out a couple of average ones, shown below.. 15. 16. 17. 18. Surveying the damage caused by a fire at the end of the summer. 19. Rooflections 20. 21. Just a random fact... "In addition to their wages, workers were given three free pints a day!", If only I was born 50 years earlier.... As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated.
  12. Those of you who have been around this hobby for a long time will probably recognise the name Langley Maltings as a real blast from the past, I certainly remember seeing photos of it in it's exploring heyday before the big fire at the end of 2009 wiped out half the site. After a couple of fails and some lunch we headed here on a total whim, I was amazed it was even still standing when I checked it out on street view the night before, so having not seen any photos from it online since 2011 (the last post I can find on any forum) I thought we should see what was what. As we pulled up outside I caught sight of a group of youngsters inbetween two of the buildings who quickly came legging it out the site as we got out the car, I think we scared the crap out of them thinking we were security or an unmarked police car but some quick words of reassurance that we were going in there too put them at ease! Whats left is pretty empty but we caught the lovely evening light - looking at old photos it appears that along with the fire that took out the top floors of half the listed building they have demolished other extensions and more modern parts as well leaving only the listed bits standing. It's also worth noting for anyone planning a visit that there is what appears to be a stagnating open sewer running through the ground floor level of the un-burnt part, it is the single most unpleasant thing I have ever smelt on an explore in all my five+ years of explores, what doesn't help is there is a pipe next to it which has a small split so is spraying an aerosol of water over the whole area carrying the stench and nasty stuff over the basement. We drove the whole way back with the car windows open to try and get the stink off our shoes! We ran out of daylight before we could properly investigate the burnt out section. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157649204637041/
  13. After Much Googling we decided to head back down the M1 towards this next site and see what we could see. It didn't look much by the pictures but succeded our expectations. We stopped off in Sileby, Leicstershire early evening and popped into this old Brewery/Maltings. It was thought to have been developed in the 1860s to a Brewery. Operating as "The Sileby Brewery", It was taken over in 1920 by Strettons who were taken over seven years later by Samuel Allsop. It is thought to have been use unitl the 1980s as a Maltings. Visited with Mookster during a Northern Road Trip #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157644297767010/
  14. A slightly paranoid explore for some reason. So many creaking noises, it was all a bit strange in here! A very pretty place.
  15. History has been done and done again, didn't have much time here bloody shame !, we only scratched the surface and need to go back soon as but time was against us from the start..... if anyone is going here pm me please.....nick
  16. NOTE: Dont get your hopes up about this place, its sealed up now The buildings were originally the site of the Beeston Brewery which was founded in 1896 and carried on production until 1922 when it was taken over by Shipstones & Sons and converted into maltings, which served the main brewerys in Nottingham. Beeston was the first pneumatic maltings in Britain. It was constructed in 1878, for Messrs Waite, Corbould and Faulkner of the Beeston Brewery Company. It was closely followed by one for Messrs Flowers and Sons at Stratford-upon-Avon, Two other pneumatic maltings on the same system were constructed shortly afterwards, firstly for Nimmo and Sons at the Castle Eden Brewery, County Durham, and then slightly later for Messrs Sedgwick and Co at Watford. Of these examples, the only building known to survive with at least its original shell is that at Beeston. Two other pneumatic maltings on the same system were constructed shortly afterwards, firstly for Nimmo and Sons at the Castle Eden Brewery, County Durham, and then slightly later for Messrs Sedgwick and Co at Watford. Of these examples, the only building known to survive with at least its original shell is that at Beeston. Unfortunately this traditional floor maltings, which supplied many of the country’s craft brewers, closed in 2000 for redevelopment as residential units. Visited with Raptor Jesus The remaining photo's not shown here can be viewed here: Maltings Thanks for looking RiF
  17. Another site we took in on our recent roadtrip. Had a bit of a twist this explore did. We'd been there about 2 hours and had worked our way down to the buildings closest to the entrance when we saw two police vehicles drive past the front of the buildings inside the compound - bugger that's not good. They seemed to circle and drive away again so we didn't think a lot of it and carried on. Then we noticed a party of around 10-15 people at one end of the carpark area out the front. Hmmmm, wonder what they're doing here? Turned out they were on an official tour of the site from the owners agent, obviously prosepctive buyers for the site which is still up for sale. Damn, we were cornered as there was pretty much no way out without being seen so we cautiously made our way into one of the buildings that offered a good view over the site and basically waited for them to bugger off. Had a close call at one point when they actually came into the bottom of the building we were in, luckily they didn't venture upstairs - hardly surprising given the state of the floors! History (Borrowed from elsehwere on 'tinternet) The Sleaford Maltings were established by Bass in 1901, with production beginning in 1906. There are 8 Malt houses, Drying Kilns, Boiler House, Beam Engine House, Water Tower and other Buildings. Originally the Maltings were designed to have 16 malt houses which would have been opposite the current eight and would have doubled the size of the complex. The malting's remained in production until 1958 when they were closed after changes to the way that malt was produced. The buildings went on to become a chicken farm / food process plant which ws closed following the construction of the neighboring housing estates. This place is pretty big, but quite trashed in parts which made exploring it interesting. There's substantial fire damage to some of the buildings, and the rest of the remaining ones are in a reasonably poor condition, floors are quite sketchy in most of the buildings. Pics: The water Tower/Engine house was the most interesting part really. Mainly because of the awesome Spiral Staircase. And the View from the top. This is the group of people who showed up while we were inside! Thanks for looking, Maniac.
  18. - http://www.sleafordmaltings.com/All history along with maps and plans etc can be found in link above. On with teh picktehz! The most awesome spiral staircase in the world ever! The last ladder Quick shot of the top Burnt out section Pretty solid considering age... kinda looks like smokes coming outta chimney, though don't let your eyes deceive you; you may be surprised to learn that the chimney is no longer functioning... Visiting again soon, as I'm not overly happy with these pics, anyway ta for looking, l8rz Shadow
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