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  1. History This colliery was opened in 1901 due to the increasing demand of coal in this heavy industrialized area of Germany. After that this coal mine grew rapidly in the amount of employees and the amount of coal that was made in this place, this complex made on its peak around 9000 tons coal per day. In 1997 this coal mine was sold to another big german coal mining concern. in 2010 this place needed to be shut down to new environmental reasons and because mining coal in this area was outdated and too expensive. Our explore: when we went to this place we didn't really knew what to expect of this place this was because we didn't really saw any photos of this place at that time, i only knew that there was a nice cooling tower on this site and that there was a control room somewhere. When we entered the complex we could pretty much walk free around, there warent any camera's or sensors at the time of exploring. After walking around for awhile we found an entrance to the admin building. When we got inside we were absolutely staggered with the state this building was in. Everything was still like the closing day in 2010, and it was really nice and warm inside (75 degrees Fahrenheit). There was also an amazing room full of baskets, this one is probably one of the better examples. I really liked exploring this place! Elephant by Hooismans, on Flickr Bergwerk HR by Hooismans, on Flickr Cooling Tower by Hooismans, on Flickr Cooling Tower by Hooismans, on Flickr Bergwerk HR by Hooismans, on Flickr Baskets by Hooismans, on Flickr I also made a video of this place where i tell the history of this place. And where i explain were certain rooms were used for. It is is dutch but i has Subtitles. Thanks for reading through!
  2. History Kelenföld Power Plant is located in Budapest and was originally established in 1914, in conjunction with Hungary's electrification program. It was known as one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced throughout Europe and supplied electricity to the entire capital. The site itself featured the first boiler house as an electrical supply building in the city. Between 1922 and 1943 the plant underwent two extension phases which introduced 19 modernised steam boilers and 8 turbines. These were operated at 38 bar steam pressure and transferred the increasing demand for electricity through 30 kV direct consumer cables. The equipment used was considered state of the art at the current time and was all produced by Hungarian manufacturers. By the 1930s the facility contributed to 60% of Budapest's heating and hot water which made up 4% of the country's overall energy supply. The infamous Art Deco control room, also known as 'Special K' was completed in 1927, after two years of construction. Designed by notable architects Kálmán Reichl and Virgil Borbíro, because of this, it's listed as a protected site under Hungarian law and cannot be restored or destroyed. The Kelenföld control room is widely acclaimed as one of the most stunning monuments of industrial art. It uniquely explores the boundaries between functionality and grandeur, featuring a decorative oval skylight alongside the retro style green panels, hosting a range of buttons, dials, and gauges. Once the Second World War had begun, a small concrete shelter was added for the employees. This was due to the ornate glass ceiling, as it was considered to be a target during the bombing raids in the city. By 1962 the plant was modernised again with accordance to the heat supply demands of the capital. The existing condensing technology was replaced with back pressure heating turbines and hot water boilers. This increased reliability, as coal was steadily becoming more outdated and inefficient. In 1972 gas turbines with a capacity of 32 MWe were integrated into the plant and were the first to be put into operation throughout Hungary. In 1995 another redevelopment phase was initiated which provided the power station with a heat recovery steam generator and later on in 2007 a water treatment plant was established. The control room itself was closed in 2005, since then it has been featured in a few well-known films such as the Chernobyl Diaries and World War Z. Other areas of the site remain active through private ownership, with buildings still providing power to Budapest. Our Visit We arrived in Budapest feeling cautiously optimistic, we had other locations on our agenda for the weekend but Kelenföld was a significant reason for our visit. It's something I've wanted to see since I started exploring a couple of years ago and failure was not an option for us. We had 3 days and therefore 3 attempts (at the minimum) to access it. Fortunately for us, we managed to get in the first time around and we couldn't have really asked for a better way to kick off the trip. Once we made it inside the plant we found ourselves lost in a maze of locked doors and sealed off sections. Understandably they wanted to make it as difficult to get into the control room as possible. Whilst searching we heard the familiar sound of nearby footsteps and radio so we quickly found a decent spot to hide. "We have to keep moving, if we stay here we'll get busted," I said to my exploring partner, after a handful of excruciating minutes, listening to them steadily get closer and so we pressed on. Without giving too much away we managed to find our way to the main spectacle and were instantly blown away by it's immense beauty. So without further ado, onto the photos! Unfortunately, with the security guard on the hunt for us we decided to bounce before getting caught ((more so my other half than myself.) As much as I would have loved to stay, I didn't argue. Means we have an excuse to go back! As always if you've got this far, hope you enjoyed reading my report
  3. The Italians don't mess around when it comes to architecture and this old sanatorium is no exception. Built in 1924 in an art deco style, it began life as a tuberculosis hospital before being converted into a generic hospital in the 1950s. In 2015 it closed down to make way for a new hospital. Most of it has been completely emptied now but the admin building and chapel are stunning regardless. The vast network of tunnels are pretty epic as well with workshops, locker rooms and some odd looking stretchers amongst other things down there. They connect every single building in the complex so you can access certain buildings that are sealed from outside. It's a big old place with a lot to see. I've been twice and still not seen it all. Wards Tunnels Admin Block The Chapel Thanks for looking
  4. A strange place, fake as f*** , but awesome to see and wander around
  5. I discovered this big factory almost 2 years ago. It used to build washing machines and it was closed down more than 10 years ago. At that time it was already obvious that the location was completely empty... but what made me really interested in this place was the colour of some building of the complex: that very particular red, which almost seems like blood, was enough to make me say "I need to go there". And so I did. As I guessed, there was nothing inside lol, but I don't regret this exploration at all... Btw this place is a little bit tricky because it's completely surrounded by houses, so everyone can see you. We had to hide in various occasion: one time there was a watch dog who was barking to us from his home so we hid ourselves behind a wall, just 2 meters away from it. Luckily its owners didn't get why that dog was barking that much. At some point an old lady and her husband saw us but in the end nothing happened... Here is the complete album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskSXJdtA
  6. So a few weeks ago, myself and two other explorers; @albino-jay and @ Ferret whom I've known online for many years, but never managed to explore with! We all get round to exploring with one another eventually! This site was previously owned by a firm who were contracted to develop technology for the military, but was eventually sold off to a property developer after its 2011 closure. The site has recently become the Urbex Hotspot for people, so it was good to get it done and dusted before it got too much worse. We really enjoyed ourselves, and despite being fairly stripped out, there was a lot to see here. We spent around 10 hours on site I think!!! Once again, we bumped into about 4 other groups of explorers. I guess this is becoming a thing nowadays in this hobby to be honest! Just gotta face the facts that it is now mainstream... The Royal Radar Establishment; a former Research Centre in Malvern, Worcestershire in the United Kingdom was formed in 1953 as the Radar Research Establishment by the merger of the Air Ministry's Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and the British Army's Radar Research and Development Establishment (RRDE). It new name was given after a visit by Queen Elizabeth II in 1957. Both names were later abbreviated to RRE. In 1976 the Signals Research and Development Establishment (SRDE), involved in communications research, joined the RRE to form the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE). They had been closely associated since before the beginning of World War II, when the predecessor to RRDE was formed as a small group within the Air Ministry's research center in Bawdsey Manor. They were soon forced to leave Bawdsey due to its exposed location on the east coast of England. After several moves, the groups finally settled in separate locations in Malvern beginning in May 1942 with a merger in 1953 that formed the RRE and renamed these as the North Site (RRDE) and the South Site (TRE). In 1991 they were partially privatize, and became Defence Evaluation and Research Agency in 1996. The North Site was closed in 2003 and the work was consolidated at the South Site, while the former North Site was sold off for housing developments. The RSRE is now part of Qinetiq. Some of the most important technologies developed from work at RSRE are radar, thermography, liquid crystal displays and speech synthesis. Contributions to computer science made by the RSRE included ALGOL 68RS (a portable implementation of ALGOL 68, following on from ALGOL 68R developed by RRE), Coral 66, radial basis function networks, hierarchical self-organising networks (deep autoencoders), the VIPER high-integrity microprocessor, the ELLA hardware description language, and the TenDRA C/C++ compiler. The RSRE motto was Ubique Sentio, which is Latin for "I sense everywhere". The site is well explored after its sale to a Private Developer. It is well worth visiting with its mockup of a RADAR Bunker. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 #32 #33 #34 #35 #36 #37 #38 #39 #40 Thanks for Looking More at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704376480512/page1 This was a busy one, so you will have to exit via the Gift Shop I'm afraid!
  7. I have decided not to name this one; it sits in the middle of a large Brand New Housing Estate in a rather affluent part of the UK, not far from London. The reason behind this is because it looks as if its either being converted or used for storage; and tbh I don't think it needs hundreds of people going to it; its situated in the grounds of the Site Office. The Church was part of a huge Convent which I didn't even know existed; and was locally derelict for many, many years, completely unbeknownst to me! It was last used as a church when the complex closed in 2006. Visited with a Non-Explorer friend. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  8. Solo jaunts. So after Chinese New Year there was yet another public holiday in Taiwan, and you know what that means? More exploring! This here is a compilation of different sites all well known to the exploring network, all very famous but compared to the general benchmark not enough to warrant standalone reports again. As I mentioned before, sometimes it's about scratching the itch just to get it off your mind rather than the drop-everything hit-the-road urge you get for some places. 台灣民俗村/Taiwan Folk Village Taiwan Folk Village was a mock-traditional park east of Huatan, near Zhanghua in the Bagua Mountain Scenic Area. Opened in 1993 it was a hugely successful site, a showcase of Taiwan traditional temples and aboriginal architecture (straw huts, temples and so forth) although if you ask me it all felt tacky with little historic value. That's the trouble with Taiwan; compared to Europe precious little remains of genuine, traditional architecture of dynasty's gone past. Not only that, I cannot understand what desire people have to turn such places into theme parks complete with swimming pools and rides rather than showcase the history. I digress. As with so many places in Taiwan, the 921 Earthquake meant a sharp drop in visitor numbers, pushing the operating company into the red, culminating in closure come 2012. It's in the backwaters of Taiwan with no public transport, so I had to begrudgingly take a taxi to get there. Unfortunately the taxi driver was oblivious to my intentions and dropped me off at the main gate, in full view of security. I get out, and there they are sat outside the cabin staring at me and wondering what I want to do. I don't want to ruin my chances and arouse suspicion, so I walked away as they watched. Awkward. I walk up the road and look for a way in, but there's a huge drop from the road down to the boundary fence. Getting in was a mission to say the least, having to find a safe spot to drop down and then find a suitable point to actually enter the site! I finally found one after considerable effort, then had to beat through thick bushes to get onto the roof of the main walls. A challenge, but I have an itch to scratch so I don't have a choice. Although I've lived in Taiwan for 2+ years, for those unfamiliar with Asian architecture the attention to detail in temples is beautiful; each aspect is unique. Unfortunately the interior was stripped and somewhat decayed with zero interest. The site is not fully abandoned, however. There are plenty of buddhist shrines and the mock-village buildings are still maintained by on-site staff. I saw a handful of scooters parked up around the site, and was certain there was someone lurking in places least expected so I had to be very careful. The biggest problem however was a dozen or so stray dogs who ran around in packs. Any sight of a foreigner liked myself triggered a chorus of barking, not out of hostility but perhaps curiosity and simply being an unexpected presence. Unfortunately this meant I had to move fast from building to building to avoid getting attention from security or caretakers. I tried to access the best part of the site, the beautiful mock-village quarters in the middle of the site, however to protect the shrines and interior these were completely locked up. At the northernmost part of the site was a large temple, which I managed to get inside however the interior was completely empty and lacking in interest. I was absolutely certain there was a caretaker lurking inside too, so only 2 shots. I went in search of the carousel and theme park attractions to the west of the site, however since the previous reports these have all been demolished. No loss, but that meant it was time to leave, so I headed back out and bade farewell. A derp for sure, but not a complete waste of time. Stay tuned for the rest. Love as always, TBM x
  9. History This coal mine was established in 1910 and was funded by the Prussian empire. This facility contained two elevator towers. In 1912 the construction began on a cokes plant right next to the coal mine. In 1943 the mine shut down due to the second world war, after 6 years the mine reopened again. With this reopening there was also a major renovation, with this renovation there was a larger modern elevator added to the facility. In 1998 the facility was bought by a big coal mining corporation which owned 5 other coal mines. In 2008 the 98 year old coal mining facility was closed down by the government. The historic part is currently being restored and the part that was renovated after the war will probably be torn down. Explore when we got in we first went trough a whole system with conveyer belts, after that we ended up in the huge coal washery. after we explored this part we went up into the elevator tower. The tower was 10 floors high so we were quite tired then we were on the tower but it was really worth it, in the tower there was an enormous electrical lift motor which was really nice to take pictures from. It was a really cool place to explore, I really enjoyed it! I also made a documentary about this place, the video is down below this post (it is in Dutch, but it has english subtitles) Here is the video i made on this place
  10. Travelling home from an explore I spy an empty hostelry hmmmmm got to have a mooch it would be rude not to; seems like even though it got great reviews on trip adviser the place closed in Nov 2016; all the bar fittings have been removed in a half arsed attempt at renovation; still powered up as a lot of upstairs lights were on
  11. A former childrens home part of the Operational Pallial sexual abuse investigation and latterly a residential home for the elderly; the access points to the main building have recently been glued and screwed; still a good mooch round the other buildings
  12. So here is the second site of mine and Mookies mad few days. Bearing in mind I’ve been too busy to do photo reports of late. Extensive History, borrowed from Merlin's report: History of the National Institute for Research in Dairying The need for farm land at agricultural research institutes is occasionally questioned. At the N.I.R.D. (National Institute for Research in Dairying) it wouldn’t have been impossible to carry out research on the physiology of lactation and ruminant nutrition with a few cows and relatively little land, but for a substantial system of applied research on milk production technology, large numbers of cattle at the calf, rearing and lactation stages are much needed. The 1920 move from Reading to Shinfield provided the Institute with Church Farm. This was set in 332 acres of land and included some traditional buildings which, with some fairly cheap additions; allowed the development of a Shorthorn herd of up to 60 cows. Expansion of the farming activities was soon needed. This became evident during the 1930's. In 1945 land was pretty inexpensive and was coming on the market locally. Arborfield Hall Farm was purchased in 1947 (299 acres). Although this subsequently became the home of the Bernard Weitz Centre with a new herd of 400 lactating cows. The site eventually closed in mid 1980s, and the grounds were maintained initially, which stopped by about the early 1990s. As the history of this site is quite big, here is a link to the source of the article below. http://www.arborfieldhistory.org.uk/properties_NIRD.htm The roofs of the buildings were removed in the 2000’s to prevent squatters. A pretty mundane looking explore which actually turned out very photogenic due to the sun shine. Actually quite an enjoyable, relaxed hour or two. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157642360601123/
  13. Been wanting to get in this place ever since I saw it years ago. These are just a few pictures I took The Ghajn Tuffieha Military Camp dates back to the late 19th century. By 1910, a formal military camp was in place consisting of timber ’Crimea Huts’ which were later replaced with more permanent masonry replacements, Throughout the immediate post-war years up to the late 1960s, the Ghajn Tuffieha Camp represented one of the busiest spots on the island for military training for both British and NATO forces. In the late 1970s the lower camp was converted into the Hal Ferh tourism accommodation complex.
  14. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  15. The Explore I actually explored this about eight weeks ago with Southside. I drove to Slough, Parked up and he had kindly found the way in before I got to the University Campus. The site is massive, and right in the centre of Slough. I work fairly close to Slough, and had seen the site some weeks before when collecting lunch from Roosters Piri Piri just opposite the site. It's kind of strange that its sat here for so long; its very close to London and land in this general area is typically very, very expensive. That does not of course, make Slough a pleasant place... I think there was a bit of an increase of traffic here after my visit, I have only just got around to editing these! Its amazing how such a large site has sat beneath the radar for such a long time!!! The Site Thames Valley University or TVU as its known; is part of the University of West London and formed part of a conglomerate of several campuses in Reading and West London. The closure of this Campus was announced in 2009 and the doors finally closed it's doors in 2010. The site has now fallen into disuse and it's 1000 students had to re-locate to other campuses around West London. Closure was blamed on the recession/credit crunch at the time; forcing the sale of the site. "Professor Peter John, TVU vice-chancellor, said: 'For the majority of students the closure of the campus will mean a move to one of our other locations either in Reading or West London. All those affected will be fully supported through the transition to minimise any possible disruption to their studies.' A total of 650 pre-registration nursing students at the Slough campus will be provided with a provisional timetable and have been told to pack their bags for the move to Reading by December this year." The site consists of two tower blocks (7 stories high), a ground floor canteen, a small circular building named "The Rotunda" which houses the University's Srudent Uninon, and a 2 story admin block. Plans were announced in 2017 to redevelop the site into 1,400 homes, but so far nothing has happened. Currently the site is owned by the Slough Council. It was a surprisingly relaxed explore. The road outside was very, very busy and all could be heard on the street outside. There were incredibly recent signs of a squat inside one of the rooms; fresh new sleeping bags and food dated for that day in bags; sandwiches, fruit etc. I could hear someone inside who I believe left when they heard us. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 Thanks for reading! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696167343975
  16. Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that due to it's location, Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage for the German forces. Because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest defence base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque built in Germany was founded on this site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim POW's (prisoners of war) that were being held in the facility. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. Once the First World War had come to an end, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school a year later in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion from spies within the allied forces. The construction of these bunkers weren't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared in Europe. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany in 1990 when it was handed back to the state. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to explore and document this location. I hope you enjoy my report! Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  17. Red Morgue Hospital I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  18. History Once the magnificent property in East Germany housed a spa building. Around 1950, the building was converted into a hotel, which was given the name of a Duchess. In the 90s, it was closed for cost reasons, since it decays visibly. The Explore Access was easy; the front door was locked, but some open windows and a open door at the back. My first visit was in 2011. Now I returned to see how the building has changed over the past seven years. Many ceilings and floors had collapsed meanwhile, and some areas I could't enter therefore. Unfortunately, some things were destroyed by vandalism or were stolen. For example, all banisters and the ornamented window arches. But on the other hand, the natural decay of the past few years has been very interesting. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Here are also a few comparison pictures and some photos from 2011 of rooms that couldn't be entered anymore today. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 - Also this rose has been gone due to the collapse of the ceiling.
  19. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  20. Visited with Mookster on a small short road trip around the midlands back in March. This site was absolutely wrecked throughout and of little interest. An 80s style factory which closed sometime in 2016. But it was still an explore! James Thomas Engineering was started in a small garage in Bishampton England in 1977. The business grew and moved to a converted office unit, to a much larger 5000 square foot unit in 1980. This planted the seeds for a new industry leader in aluminium all purpose truss design. By 1983, James Thomas developed a pre-rigged truss design used by major rock bands on world tours. By 1990, JTE began manufacturing in the USA to keep truss design moving on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Come 1992, the super truss system was designed. The Company was Liquidated in 2017 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694367095931
  21. On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  22. Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  23. Hello, This was my 16th visit to Belgium for Exploring! Was a great little explore, only history I could find is below. It is a mix between DLSR and phone photos. This power plant was built in 1960 and operated on gas . In 2014, the plant was closed. 40 jobs were lost. It turns out that the electricity in the whole place is still working and the computers are still running!
  24. Another one from early last year. A nice mix on the same site this one with the awesome old wooden part next to a burned out, vandalised, graffiti strewn new part. It brought into sharp contrast the difference between a interesting and unique explore with loads to see and photograph and a wreaked, empty and mostly uninteresting burned out shell. The feeling of enjoyment and satisfaction I got from both was definitely different. I found it an interesting experience in this mad hobby we do. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY The Old Fisons site was originally the location for the first ever complete superphosphate factory. In the mid 19th century, the increasing demand for new effective fertilisers for agriculture led to a search for a substitute for crushed bones, the traditional source of fertiliser. Edward Packard discovered that the use of fossil dung, found across East Anglia, contained high levels of phosphate, the ideal base for fertiliser. Between 1851 and 1854, Packard built a warehouse at Paper Mill Lane and pioneered the production of artificial fertilisers for horticulture on an industrial scale. It was an ideal site due to the combination of the River Gipping, which was navigable by barges between Ipswich and Stowmarket from the late 18th century onwards, and the addition of the railway line in 1846 which both provided the means to import raw materials and export fertilisers. Edward Packard was joined in 1858 by Joseph Fison who constructed his chemical works opposite the North Warehouse. The lower two floors of this iconic warehouse date from this time and were used for bagging and storage and are identified on early Ordnance Survey maps as the Eastern Union Works, proving the North Warehouse was purpose-built and directly associated with the production of superphosphates. The factory shut its doors in 2002 and has remained empty ever since. . . Thanks for Looking All the best for the New Year More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157678463886994/with/33624996416/
  25. Visited with banned batz and andy. First time out for awhile included a trip here. This was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead, Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill.By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved.At its height it employed 180 people but the mill shut down in 1982. There are currently plans to try and convert it in to apartments.
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