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  1. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  2. In this video we are exploring an abandoned asylum which opened in 1930 and closed in 1997. I hope you liked the video!
  3. This is Manicomio Di V (Mental asylum). The hospital was built in 1930 due to growing demand for mental support in the region. The hospital closed in 1991 due to new laws. [ The overgrown church [ The entrance of the theatre The decaying theatre The old projector Fences to prevent patients escaping or committing suicide The overgrown roads through the facility The entrance of the shower building The shower rooms Decaying bathroom Picture of one of the patients This was the section were alcohol addicted people would be taken care of Old poster of a Lancia Prisma Backstage the theatre The stockroom One room were the patients would sleep a couple of phones thrown in a corner Thanks for looking!
  4. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  5. Yet another place that nobody seems to visit unlike some of the places that are in a lot worse shape that people flock to like sheep! but anyway made for a eventful mooch with Fat Panda as usual! We arrived here to find the alarms already blaring out and after a helping hand from The_Raw with a bit of improv we found ourselves inside and greeted by the main hall, the rest of the place wasn't in bad shape but nothing of interest really! History stolen from The_Raw Shelton Hospital was custom built and opened in 1845 at Bicton Heath, Shrewsbury. The building was designed by George Gilbert Scott (the great grandfather of the architect who designed Battersea Power Station and the Red Phone Boxes, Giles Gilbert Scott) and William B Moffat. The Asylum was designed in the Corridor Layout that was prolific at the time, being symmetrical so that males and females could easily be segregated. The total cost of the original building came to £17,000. The hospital opened on the 18th of March, 1845, with a capacity of 60 patients. By the opening, the patients requiring treatment had increased to 104. At its peak in 1947, the hospital had 1027 patients. In 1968, a fire ripped through a ward killing 21 of the hospital's most severely mentally ill female patients. Most of the women were asleep and some were unable to move from their beds without assistance. The fire is thought to have been started by a discarded cigarette and it was found that none of the nurses were trained in fire evacuation procedures. A short BBC video from 1968 including interviews with a nurse and the hospital manager after the fire can be seen here: BBC News Player - 1968: Hospital blaze kills 21 Over the years the hospital had its own cricket and football sides, a band, a farm supplying food to the hospital, jobs for patients and even a brewery. In Victorian times these places were designed to be self-contained, it was an institution so people who were admitted there often ended up living there their whole lives. Often the staff also would stay there for years and their children would eventually become staff there so you would have generations of people who had worked at the same place. Some of the treatments carried out there 100 years ago would now be seen as appalling and primitive, but knowledge and understanding of mental health was not what it is today and the public’s attitudes took time to change. The grade II listed building, which has been much adapted over the more than 150 years since it opened, closed as a hospital in September 2012. Its role has now been taken over by a new mental health village nearby called The Redwoods Centre, home to around 200 patients. Shelton has now been bought by Shropshire Homes and is being turned into luxury flats, work starts in September 2014. Cheers for looking
  6. The History Shelton Hospital was custom built and opened in 1845 at Bicton Heath, Shrewsbury. The building was designed by George Gilbert Scott (the great grandfather of the architect who designed Battersea Power Station and the Red Phone Boxes, Giles Gilbert Scott) and William B Moffat. The Asylum was designed in the Corridor Layout that was prolific at the time, being symmetrical so that males and females could easily be segregated. The total cost of the original building came to £17,000. The hospital opened on the 18th of March, 1845, with a capacity of 60 patients. By the opening, the patients requiring treatment had increased to 104. At its peak in 1947, the hospital had 1027 patients. In 1968, a fire ripped through a ward killing 21 of the hospital's most severely mentally ill female patients. Most of the women were asleep and some were unable to move from their beds without assistance. The fire is thought to have been started by a discarded cigarette and it was found that none of the nurses were trained in fire evacuation procedures. A short BBC video from 1968 including interviews with a nurse and the hospital manager after the fire can be seen here: BBC News Player - 1968: Hospital blaze kills 21 Over the years the hospital had its own cricket and football sides, a band, a farm supplying food to the hospital, jobs for patients and even a brewery. In Victorian times these places were designed to be self-contained, it was an institution so people who were admitted there often ended up living there their whole lives. Often the staff also would stay there for years and their children would eventually become staff there so you would have generations of people who had worked at the same place. Some of the treatments carried out there 100 years ago would now be seen as appalling and primitive, but knowledge and understanding of mental health was not what it is today and the public’s attitudes took time to change. The grade II listed building, which has been much adapted over the more than 150 years since it opened, closed as a hospital in September 2012. Its role has now been taken over by a new mental health village nearby called The Redwoods Centre, home to around 200 patients. Shelton has now been bought by Shropshire Homes and is being turned into luxury flats, work starts in September 2014. The Explore I already posted a report on this place a couple of months ago and called it Asylum X, here I have included more in-depth history, some different shots and some externals. Why? Because why the F*** not I believe this is the last of the Victorian asylums to close their doors, I visited with a non-member friend, with both of us having grown up in Shrewsbury we were desperate to see inside the place. The site is quite large with an impressive exterior and multiple buildings including a chapel and a farm. Practically all of the contents have been removed and everything now looks quite modern but the fact it is still in pretty much pristine condition makes it worth a visit. We explored the main building in it's entirety and just one other building which used to be a secure unit with admin offices upstairs. Access was a tricky one to figure out as the place is surrounded by an unbelievable amount of motion sensors. After a couple of failed attempts (including being caught on Christmas Day morning) and much brainstorming we figured out a way in past the sensors and spent four hours nervously creeping around knowing full well that security were inside the building with us. It's fair to say that this site was a bit personal as we both knew people who spent time in there, in fact I knew a guy who ended his life in there by hanging himself in the secure unit. That was a long time ago but it still creeps me out and it added a sinister edge to seeing the place. The Pics I accidentally had my camera set to the lowest possible image size so the pictures aren't of the best quality unfortunately. I was hoping to make it back there to reshoot the place but haven't got round to it yet, I might return now that I have a wide angle lens. Hope you enjoy.... 1. The front of the main building 2. A mosaic on the floor in the staff quarters 3. The lobby of the secure unit 4. Corridor in the secure unit with just empty rooms 5. The tops of the toilet doors were slanted to stop people from attaching something to hang themselves with 6. Warped mirror....seeing your reflection in this probably wouldn't help your state of mind one little bit 7. 8. We then ventured into the basement and found this sign on a door.... 9. Filing units where records were stored.... 10. The original Victorian brickwork foundations 11. The staff bike sheds still look brand new.... 12. Once inside the main building we immediately found ourselves in the impressive great hall which was used as a canteen, I really needed a wide angle lens to capture this properly 13. 14. This corridor led from the hall to the kitchen 15. Kitchen 16. The rest of the main building consisted mainly of corridors with private bedrooms 17. 18. Windows with blinds, curtains and blinds being practically the only thing left behind 19. More corridors, bedrooms and other bits.... 20. 21. Birthday card from a relative to a patient 22. One of many intact bathrooms 23. Patient accomodation kitchen 24. Colourful ward 25. Another corridor with rows of doors 26. Inside the attic with an especially creepy looking gate for an entrance 27. And finally, a few exterior shots showing some of the outer buildings 28. 29. 30. The chapel built in 1858 Thanks for looking, I hope you enjoyed seeing inside Shelton!
  7. This is my second visit here but after 4 hours there the last time we still missed quite a lot (And still didn't get into one this time) I went with my nephew (High Tower) the first time and his youngest bro (Matt) wanted to go if we went again. The day didn't start as planned as I was up all night with a bug which had been going around the family, but not wanting to let my nephew down and I wasn't going to drive I decided to go. I was picked up at 6 and including a Mac Breakfast stop we arrived just after 10. We parked up and was walking down a lane when 2 dogs appeared around a corner, then the woman owner, I thought the worse but after a quick "Morning" we carried on and into the place. To get out of sight quick we jumped into the first building we came to and worked our way around the site, we found a couple of new wards and then over to the nurses quarters. Isn't it always the way, we found a entry point where it was a very tight squeeze only to find a much bigger, easier one just further on later. All bar the down stairs in this building being mostly boarded off, all three floors are very much the same so didn't take that many photos. Then it was up to the coal silos, Matt was the first up followed by HT. I am not a great lover of heights and not feeling to good didn't help, but it just had to be done, I was completely knackered time I got to the top and couldn't wait to get back down, so only took a couple or shots. for set here https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157643530743435/ The view from the top Thanks for looking This was the first of 5 places I had planed for the day and with the next over a hour away we were only here for less than a couple of hours. Goths Chapel coming soon.
  8. Well... I thought it was about time I ventured over to the mighty Severalls to see what all the fuss is about! Along with 28DL member '12318', a sparrow-fart early start was in order and off we trotted! Access was up to the usual Sevs standard but we did it with a bit of perseverance, ignoring the inbuilt brain fault telling us "how difficult a climb can it be?"....! Once inside we headed round in the comfort of the buildings and, following the corridors, ventured around maybe half of the site until... Graham the Security guard put an end to our joviality! To be fair, he is one of the good guys and politely escorted us off site, telling us of the plethora of 'urbexers' he's had the pleasure of meeting. So, despite our stealthy prowess... we were rumbled! Unfortunate, as we were getting into our stride and had managed to see a bag full of the delights inside. Perhaps another day to finish the job! Here's a bit of history: Situated just north of Colchester (The oldest recorded town in Britain, apparently), Severall's Asylum was built in 1910 and opened it's doors for the treatment of patient's with mental health issues by 1913. The hospital, owned by Essex County Council, was the second one built in Essex to help accommodate patients in addition to Warley Hospital near Brentwood. It's design was the combined effort of F Whitmore and W.H. Town in the Edwardian 'Art & Crafts' style of facing red brickwork and large sash, bay windows giving it a simple, yet elegant look. Being connected by a huge network of corridors, the staff were able to navigate to all parts of the complex and the functional buildings housed everything from in-patient accommodation, wards and isolation units, to kitchens, laundry and workshop facilities to keep the hospital pretty much self sufficient. The hospital faithfully served Colchester and the wider community for nearly ninety years and survived two World Wars despite being bombed in 1942 by the German Luftwaffe who mistook the hospital for a factory, resulting in the tragic deaths of 38 patients. Many more were wounded. The hospital finally succumbed to the 'Mental Health & Care in the Community Act', closing it's doors for the last time in 1997. Numerous planning applications have been submitted since the hospital's closure but haven't seen any development or restoration work commence. Speaking to Graham the security bloke today confirmed that the demolition of the entire site is imminent, but, this has been mentioned countless times over the last fifteen years or so and could just be a usual ploy to discourage further breaches. I'd like to think we'll get another chance to see all we missed today but if these rumours are indeed true, the end of Severall's could be on the horizon. Here are some of the 177 shots I took today. I hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed taking them and I'm glad I got the chance to cross this one off the list! Apologies for this being a bit image-heavy and all in mono... erm... I'm not sorry really! A truly magnificent place and such a shame to see it in a state of disrepair... but then again, it wouldn't hold the same appeal if it was normal! Thanks for having a look... and thanks again to 28DL member 12318 for joining me and not pointing and laughing at this middle-aged loser trying to scale fences designed for a Russian gymnast!
  9. our very first asylum and indeed first explore.we first visited the site near halloween time. Knowing full well the history of the high suicide rate here. like amateurs were scared off by banging and shouting.( it was a good spooky night non the less). we did find away in after our first visit so took advantage in November.not scared this time we waited for security to go past and entered the burnt out builders project. Although a local trip, was a little disappointed to see the building held with braces and stripped to its bare bones. i guess we just got here in the nick of time before the re-developments are done. we explored what was safe to explore and gained entry into the water tower. brief history on the place: Stafford County Asylum opened in 1818 to accommodate 120 patients. Over the years it expanded and housed around 1000 patients. When Cotton Hill Asylum opened in 1854 for private paying patients, the Stafford County Asylum only took 'pauper lunatics'. The hospital was transferred to the National Health service in 1948 and and renamed the St George's Hospital. Like so many other asylums , it closed in the mid-1990's. It was attacked by arson in 2010. there are plans to convert the Grade II listed buildings into " 100 distinctive dwellings", and work started in 2008. sorry about picture quality.i was new to exploring and was only armed with a compact and a phone. be careful if climbing the rusty stairs seen in this pic.one of our team fell through unfortunately the above 3 pictures were taken when scouting the place. the rest are taken in darkness guys ...sorry damaged by arson famous caged stairs. put in after a girl through her self down and landed in reception :0( the old and not so trusty elevator A STAIRWAY TO NO WHERE mystery trunk as if this curtain still hangs!!!!!!!!!! patient rooms fire damaged thanks for looking guys :0)
  10. This was my second stop for the day, we had already been to Simons Mill (Report soon) and we had arranged with Canonfodder & Jen (Not sure if she has a user name on here) for them to show us around the Great Denbigh Asylum. I don't know what I expected, but the first thing was the lack of graffiti/street art. I know a lot of people don't like it, but I do. We started with the Church and while Canonfodder and my nephew (I will call him HT (High Tower)) climbed the silos, I wondered off and checked the place out. Over the next 4 hours we bumped into each other now and again and other than a couple of young girls with a boy, that is all we saw during that time. Anyway, Big thanks to Canonfodder & Jen for the great tour (Looking forward to your photos and report) and a couple from above by HT hope you enjoy Full set here for mine http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157639904413246/ and HTs http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157639916469696/
  11. Second Visit here and second on my own, but this time the tour bus was in as there were quite a few groups on site. I spent over 3 hours here and managed to see building and other stuff I missed the last time. Not much to say about the site that's not already been said so I will get on with the photos. full set here http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157640156724954/ That's me done, thanks for looking
  12. www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldxV2akahYU
  13. I've been wanting to visit this place for a while, so we decided to stop by and have a look around, it does look worse than I thought it would be, it's absolutely trashed now. Lots of work has been going on and everything has been stripped bare. From what I was told, one of the rooms that has been locked for years has finally been opened, pics follow: You can see more on the Kent Underground and Abandoned Places page.
  14. This lot should keep ya busy lol:- http://www.thetimechamber.co.uk/beta/si ... ylums-list
  15. I wasn't sure weather to post this one as some of the photos are not great. This was my first ever explore and only had a point and shoot at the time and no tripod. It's very stripped inside the hospital but the main hall is fantastic and probably one of the best in the UK, this is down to the very effective security and P.I.R sensors scattered around the site, we managed 4 hours in here before we were welcomed by 2 secca and 6 coppers some of which were armed. A couple of years later I returned and found access to the service tunnels but every access point into the hospital from the tunnels were sealed off.
  16. Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 to the design of architect Frank Whitmore. It opened in May 1913. The 300-acre site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy. The use of these treatments peaked in the 1950s. In her book Madness in Its Place: Narratives of Severalls Hospital, 1913-1997 Diana Gittins notes that often women were admitted by their own family, sometimes as the result of bearing illegitimate children or because they had been raped. As they would not always (or were unable to) carry out daily tasks, they were considered to be insane and some were even subjected to ECT and lobotomy. A change in management during the 1960s (and likely a change in social acceptances) saw reforms introduced including the creation of art and music therapy programs and the widespread use of drugs and medication. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally, the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the Central Boiler House in 2007. In 2008, the sale of the Hospital Site, including its extensive Grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the Building Industry. , , ,
  17. Barrow Hospital (sometimes referred to as Barrow Gurney Hospital) was a psychiatric hospital in Barrow Gurney, Somerset The hospital was designed by Sir George Oatley of Bristol to the then-innovative colony plan based on detached 'villas' centred around a central cluster of service buildings. The plan called for 25 villas to house 1,200 patients, treatment centres for local authority and private patients, a chapel, recreation hall, laundry and central kitchens. The buildings were austerely constructed of red brick with pantiled mansard roofs and were situated so as to give a sense of community and privacy as well as to take advantage of the wooded surroundings which were retained and enhanced by tree-thinning and landscaping. Construction began in 1934 and although the hospital was not officially opened until 3rd May 1939, Barrow Hospital received its first patients in May 1938 with the complex still only half-built. It was intended that the rest of the planned buildings should be gradually added over the following years as funds allowed, but the outbreak of war in September 1939 halted all work on site and the architect's full vision was never realised. At the outbreak of the Second World War the hospital was commandeered by the Royal Navy and became the Royal Naval Auxiliary Hospital, Barrow Gurney. The hospital treated seamen who had been injured during conflicts or who were suffering from psychological distress, brought in through the nearby Port of Bristol In 1940, the daily average number of patients under treatment was 356 and the medical and nursing staff numbered 215. The Naval Hospital was decommissioned and returned to civilian use in 1946. In 1960 the hospital's population reached a peak of 453. At this time it was predicted that new community-based care initiatives would lead to a decline in patient numbers to 200 by 1975 but in the event this target was not met. However, there was a noticeable decline in numbers during the 1970s and some residential wards were replaced with out-patient and community support services. In 2003 the Avon & Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust announced its intention to close Barrow Hospital by 2008. By 2004 only three residential wards remained open. A report published by Mind in 2003 found that on the issue of the hospital's closure, opinion among patients was divided with groups of patients having strong feelings both for and against. In 2005 a national survey of hospital cleanliness named Barrow as the dirtiest in Britain after inspectors found cigarette burns on floors, graffiti on walls, urine stains around a toilet and stains from bodily fluids on the bottom of a hoist chair. The report, combined with the collapse of part of the ceiling onto the head of a patient the same year saw the closure plan brought forward and the last ward closed the following year. After closure, the hospital attracted a variety of unofficial visitors including metal thieves, vandals and graffiti artists who contributed to the deterioration of the buildings. , , , ,
  18. visited with obscurity and Mrs obs ... a little history ... The hospital was first built between 1934-1937 with the first patients being admitted in 1938. Barrow was built in a more modern style than the nearby Bristol Mental Asylum - The Glenside, which was a huge imposing Victorian building built in the 1850's. Barrow was made up of lots of smaller buildings in a colony style.During World War II the hospital was requisitioned by the British government as use as a Naval Hospital. In 1946 the Navy left and the hospital finally reverted back to its intentional use in late 1948... on with the pics .. thanks for looking
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