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Found 8 results

  1. I had been waiting to do this one for a month or so; but simply hadn't found the time to hop on the M40 and up to Brum. It was a good opportunity to meet up with some explorers whom I have been chatting to for the best part of ten years or so and do an explore at the same time! We arrived here mid morning one Sunday and once inside; the beauty of the place was revealed! I really loved this place. Again though; it was full of the new age era of explorers; about a dozen of them, some videoing and some just shooting photos. It's rare you bump into a person on explores, but lately its been every explore. This one was flavour of the month back in the summer though!! After the explore, we went to Costco for a cheap lunch in the canteen there and had a nice, chilled drive around the local area looking for other sites The Hall, built between 1903 and 1904 by architects Ewan Harper and James Harper and the terracotta was made by Gibbs and Canning ltd of Tamworth, is situated at the northern end of Corporation Street in Birmingham. The hall is a 3 storey red brick and terracotta building with Grade II Listing on it, with 2000 seats in the main halll over 30 additional rooms including 3 school halls. By 1991, the building had been converted into a nightclub which closed in 2002, but reopened as the Q Club in 2007. This club's last event at the premises was "Flashback" in 2011. During its time as a Night Club 3 deaths were reported. -A punter jumped off the tower in 1998 -A clubber OD'd in 2000 -A stabbing outside in 2008. The Club reopened in 2012, but closed in 2016. In 2018; Birmingham city council granted planning permission to convert it into a 147 room hotel costing £35 million. Works have begun and are expected to be complete by 2020. I just love the contrast between old and new here; with the older Methodists Hall and the big, modern buildings springing up around it. There is a live part of the building and as we were there, a Gospel Band were practicing literally behind the wall; a strong scent of Jerk Chicken was filling the rooms of the abandoned part. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Thanks for Looking, more of the Hall at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674880523028
  2. Visited during a trip to Wales in May with @The_Raw When we arrived, an elderly man was sitting in front of the former church, which is on a private property. I spoke to him and he referred to the owner, who lives in a house behind the chapel. She gladly allowed us to enter the building and take pictures inside. While she got the key, we played with her dog, who was enthusiastic about our occupation with him ... Siloam Methodist Chapel was built in 1833, rebuilt in 1866 and modified in 1878. The 1886 chapel was built in the Sub-Classical style of the gable-entry type. Siloam closed in 1993 and has since been converted for secular use. The current owner bought the church a few years ago and uses it today as a storage area. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  3. This church was the reason why I wanted to go to Wales during my last trip to the UK. Thanks @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope for visiting this place with me. History (taken from The_Raw) Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  4. Methodist hall Methodist central halls were grand buildings that used to attract thousands of people when the temperance movement was at its strongest. The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Participants in the movement typically criticize alcohol intoxication or promote complete abstinence (teetotalism), leaders emphasizing the sinfulness of drinking as well as the evil effects on personality, family life. Ironically over the years many have been sold off, with some now used as bars and nightclubs. The Methodist Central Hall, Located in Corporation Street, Birmingham, England, is a three storey red brick and terracotta Grade II* listed building with a distinctive tower at the northern end of Corporation Street, opposite the Victoria Law Courts. It is located within the Steelhouse Conservation Area. The terracotta was manufactured by the renowned firm of Gibbs and Canning Limited of Tamworth, which also produced decorative works for 179-203 Corporation Street and the interior of the Victoria Law Courts in Birmingham along with the Natural History Museum in London. The street level has twelve bays of shops (four with their original fronts). The building also runs along Ryder Street and has more original shop fronts. It was built 1903-4 by architects Ewan Harper & James A. Harper at a cost of £96,165. Its main hall seats 2,000 and it has over thirty other rooms including three school halls. In 1991, the Methodist Church was converted into a nightclub; however, this venture closed in 2002. The hall was re-opened on 14 September 2007 as the 'Que club.' The opening night was hosted by 'Drop Beats Not Bombs'. On re-opening the club has seen extensive repairs and improvements to its decor, and regularly hosted events such as Atomic Jam and Fantasia. The site has remained empty since 2016 and has fallen into a state of disrepair in recent years and has had vegetation growing out of the upper floors, prompting Historic England to add it to its 'Heritage at Risk’ register. The building has been the subject of proposals to be converted into an office building. The first of such was submitted in 2001, only to be withdrawn. Planning applications to convert the building into apartments have also been rejected by Birmingham City Council on the basis that original internal features would be destroyed. However, the council has since given planning consent to a proposal to convert the building into apartments. It is to be referred to the Local Government Office. In 2017 it was reported that the Methodists Central hall is set to be transformed into a new £35 million hotel and leisure quarter with a rooftop bar and restaurant. London-based property investor Ciel Capital has unveiled plans to transform the Grade II*-listed Methodist Central Hall into a leisure complex with a hotel, apart-hotel and a mix of retail and food units. DSC_3288 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3289 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3290 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3269 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3267 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3270 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3272 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3277 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3278 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3279 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3280 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3281 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3284 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3287 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3258 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3261 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3282 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  5. King’s Hall Southall Visited with @GK_WAX and @Lavino. This was a long arsed day but a good un non the less. The lads picked me up just gone midnight for the long drive down south. I’d been to a gig and I was smashed hoping to get some sleep in the car. Fat chance of that. After nailing some greasy takeaway on my way back from town and downing a crate of redbulls I was pretty awake, sobered up and ready for some derpingz. After gaining access, which was very straightforward we found ourselves a lovely skanky little room to chill out in for a couple of hours whilst we waited for sunrise. Bumped into two other explorers in there who gave @GK_WAX a heart attack LOL! It’s a pretty cool place this, a lot bigger than what photo’s you see online, but all of the rooms at the back are pretty much the same old derpy office/classroom type and not much character to photograph. It’s amazing that this place hasn’t been shut for as long as it looks because it’s super fooked. Absolutely hammered with pigeons and mountains of their shit. Plaster falling down from every possible point, the floors are all warped like some big shit parquet Mexican wave, but still it is a pretty unique building with some lovely tiling and worth popping over to if you’re around this way. After here we tried a few other places in the area and on the way back, sadly to no avail. You can’t win em all eh. So yeah long arse drive home just in time to watch the footy order a pizza and get back on the beers. History Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013. Pics
  6. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  7. History Built in 1902-3 by Northampton architect Thomas Dyer, the Hope Methodist Church is a striking landmark on Higham Ferrers' High Street. Marked out in East Northamptonshire Council's own Conservation Area Appraisal as a building of merit, the church, which is notable for its exuberantly Gothic west end, has a powerful presence in its historically significant surroundings. Yet the historic and architectural importance of Hope Methodist Church has not been enough to dissuade its owners from drawing up plans to demolish the building and erect a new church and community centre on the site. This, despite government planning policy guidance that the demolition of conservation area buildings should only be considered after all reasonable efforts have been made to keep the building in use, as well as the Council's draft Management Plan recommending that the building be locally listed. It was opened officially in 1905 costing £5,200 to build. The Rev. Charles H. Kelly conducted the Opening Dedication Service and in the afternoon the Rev. H. Howard May conducted a Young People's Service. The first boy to be Christened in the new Church was H.E Bates. In 1922 The Pipe organs were installed and unlocked. In 1960 the boilers were converted from coke to oil burning for a price of £374. In 1986 The 81 year old wooden spire was removed from the top of the tower because it was leaning and the timbers were rotting. On top of the 24ft spire had been a 6ft weathervane. The Rev. Alan Taplin preached 50 sponsored sermons from 9.00am to 1.40pm and raised £1,320 towards the cost of the new extension. In 1988 Lightning struck the Church Hall causing the chimney to crash through the roof of the Guild Room. In 1989 Church and Hall rewired and decorated. New lighting was installed. Raunds joined the Higham Ferrers Circuit. In 1991 Asbestos cladding was removed from the boilers at a cost of £1,495 and the kitchen was refurbished. In 1992 A major leak in the hot water heating system to the Church cost £4,800 to repair. In 1996 The Youth Club was restarted. A new amplifier and loop system was installed in the Church at a cost of £2,406. In 2003 The Rushden and Higham Ferrers Circuit amalgamated with Wellingborough and became the Nene Valley Circuit. Superintendent Minister: the Rev. Gordon Chisnall. The Administration Office for the new Circuit was located at Park Road. In 2004 Rushden and Higham Ferrers Churches joined together to form one Church. Unfortunatley this meant closure for New Hope Methodist Church. The Explore Explored with a non-explorer. This site has been on my tick list for a while now as it is not too far away from me. Entrance to the site was moderatley easy, but looks like locals have made attempts to enter far harder as of recent times. Never mind, explorer experience prevailed on this occasion. The building appears to be in relatively good structural condition from the outside, but inside the place is rotting fast, with floor boards like quick sand in certain areas, albeit it is not very dangerous here. We were greeted by a large flock of pigeons roosting all over the place as we entered the main church hall who were never satisfied sitting in one place for long and enjoying crapping everywhere. There are few things left over from when the church was open; the main organ is mostly still in one piece (but not operational), the pews don’t appear to have been moved from their original position and the odd prayer book lies strewn in a corner here and there. Enjoyable explore overall. Pictures The church in 1988 August 2014 Thank you all for reading my report, I hoped you liked. The Lone Shadow
  8. Built in 1902-3 by Northampton architect Thomas Dyer, the Hope Methodist Church is a striking landmark on Higham Ferrers' High Street. Marked out in East Northamptonshire Council's own Conservation Area Appraisal as a building of merit, the church, which is notable for its exuberantly Gothic west end, has a powerful presence in its historically significant surroundings. http://www.victoriansociety.org.uk/news/northamptonshire-church-plans-flout-government-guidance/ The church has been abandoned since 2004 and has had a Demolition Grant on it since 2008. I have tried to get in here on numerous occasions over the last year but finally found a suitable access point in a place I never of thought of looking! I am aware of the noise, seems to be an issue I am having at the moment with equipment. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157650231137409/
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