Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'milton'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 6 results

  1. History Even though the small town of Milton was connected with the goldrush years in the 1860s, it was actually founded as a milling town at the beginning of the 1850s. It is rumoured that this is how the town received its name – Milltown is said to have been shortened to Milton. The Bruce Woollen Mill, which was primarily a vertical woollen and worsted manufacturing mill that made blankets, rugs, carpet and apparel fabric, was one of the later additions to the industry as it was not established until 1897. A considerable amount of money was invested in the mill as much of the company’s machinery was specialist equipment imported from Britain. If anything, then, this indicates how prosperous the industry was at the time. Although there are no records of the prices of the machines, a government website reveals that the estimated cost to run the mill initially was £6,000 ($998,000 in today’s NZ currency). However, despite the huge investment, the doors at Bruce Mill did not stay open for long as a devastating fire destroyed the building four years later. Although no one was killed, only the brick walls were left standing after the incident. The mill was rebuilt in 1902, though, thanks to the high demand for woollen products at the time. Thereafter, no further disasters occurred, and by 1923 the company had, apparently, produced the first Swanndri shirts (hard-wearing wool bush shirts). In the same year renovations had to be made to increase the size of the building to meet increasing consumer demands for their growing range of products. The main classical styled office building was the last building to be constructed as part of the expansion plans. Yet, by 1962 Bruce Woollen Mill was taken over by Alliance Textiles. The mill was run smoothly thereafter, without further incident – up until 1992 at least, when forty-nine workers were locked out for refusing to sign new contract agreements. This would result in a group of thirteen protesters assembling outside the gates for the next six years. This was the longest industrial action in New Zealand trade union history. Unfortunately, the protests did not amount to much as Alliance Textiles closed the mill in 1999, with the loss of fifty-four jobs. It was reported that it was no longer economically viable to run the mill due to cheaper products being imported from China and India. Despite the closure at the end of the 1900s, Bruce Woollen Mill Ltd. was re-established for a few years by a consortium of Wool Equities Ltd. and a group of manufacturers and wholesalers in 2012. The mill reopened as a manufacturer of woollen, merino possum, worsted and hand knitting yarns Nevertheless, the Bruce Woollen Mill went into receivership in January 2016. As a result, it is said to have had a considerable impact on the local community in terms of the job losses incurred. Our Version of Events We’d spotted Bruce Woollen Mill while we were checking out the old bacon factory in Milton, but decided we’d come back the following day to have a crack at it during the day. It’s easier to get photos during the day after all. The only problem, though, was that we weren’t quite sure if the place was abandoned or not. Therefore, we spent a little while researching the location, and eventually came across a few articles that indicated it was indeed partially closed. Well, that was good enough for us. It was time to find a way inside! Getting in wasn’t particularly easy, especially since workers from the live section of the factory kept coming outside to satisfy their nicotine addictions. However, we persevered and crept around the site checking out all the nooks and crannies, hoping one of them would reveal a way inside. In the end, our searching turned up nothing, except access to an old workshop – a part of the site that looked a lot more fucked than the other buildings. At this stage, though, we were out of options, so we decided to have a poke around inside anyway. Industrial porn is industrial porn at the end of the day, and sometimes you just have to take what you can get. As it turned out, the workshop we’d managed to access wasn’t too bad at all. The entire place was alive with the rich smells of oil and used metal. The wooden benches and floor boards were littered with hundreds of screws and heavily stained with years of grease. The sheer amount of old-school equipment in there was great to see too, and it even had the classic stash of VHS porn tapes lying around. It’s likely that we would have spent longer in this room, testing out a few of the machines to see if they worked, but this didn’t happen because we happened to find a door hidden among the shadows at the very back of the room. It goes without saying, our curiosity got the better of us and we couldn’t help but take a peek to see what was on the other side. Sure enough, it led into another room. It was a good start. This one was much different, however. Suddenly we found ourselves inside a small warehouse that was filled with cardboard boxes and metal carts. At this point we started to get a little excited, wondering if we’d perhaps found a way into the actual woollen mill as this section appeared to be an old storage area for products ready to be transported. So, with this in mind we cracked on and made our way to the other side of the building, where we found a set of industrial rubber curtains. Little did we know at the time, but this was our last obstacle – the last thing between us and the juicy machinery on the other side. One by one we passed through the curtain and, on the other side, we found ourselves standing before rows upon rows of pure industrial goodness. We’d managed to wander into the closed part of the old woollen factory, and it was fucking amazing. There were cogs, switches, levers and buttons everywhere we looked. For the next ten minutes or so, then, we were all happy snappers. If anything, mind, there was too much to take photos of! However, in our excitement we inadvertently ended up wandering into the live part of the site, where the production line was still up and running. So, from this point on we turned from being excited schoolboys into epic ninjas with unrivalled stealth skills and, somehow, managed to work our way around the workers and active machinery. It was great, being among whining machines and the whirring of drilling that coming from somewhere on the far side of the factory floor. Somehow, though we’re not quite sure exactly how, we managed to remain undetected the entire time we were inside the old woollen mill. At one point all of the machines even stopped, meaning our footsteps and camera taking noises suddenly seemed unbelievably loud. But, the guys working inside seemed oblivious to our presence. Nonetheless, after a further half an hour or so we decided that we’d pushed our luck far enough and that it was probably time to call it a day. We still had a bit of daylight left and more explores lined up, so it made sense to leave while we were still ahead. The battle to resist the urge to take more photos was intense on our way out, but eventually we managed to get back to the bus without incident. It was time to get back on the road and get a few more explored under our belts. Explored with Nillskill and Bane. Equipment being assembled in 1897 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30: 31: 32: 33: 34: 35: 36: 37:
  2. History Believe it or not, bacon has been an important part of human history since at least the twelfth century, when it was offered as a reward to married men who could go a year and a day without arguing with their wives. The term originally derived from the Middle English word ‘bacoun’, which was used to refer to all forms of pork. Across the United Kingdom, any man that brought home the bacon became well respected in his community. It is no surprise, therefore, that bacon remained a popular food among colonialist settlers in New Zealand. They brought the tradition with them and this resulted in the establishment of the Kiwi Bacon Factory in Milton. Milton very quickly became an important farming and industrial town in New Zealand. It was originally a small settlement in the 1850s, but it grew rapidly due to its geographic location that placed it on the route to several thriving goldfields. However, following the First World War the town struggled to survive. First, the significant loss of manpower had a detrimental impact on the productivity capabilities of the townspeople, and, second, the goldrush years came to an abrupt end. Eventually, only a large woollen mill (Bruce Woollen Mills) and the bacon factory (Kiwi Bacon Co. Ltd.) kept the town going through the 1900s. Both factories were the town’s main employers. Throughout the 1900s Kiwi Bacon went on to become one of New Zealand’s most prominent industries, with factories based in Auckland, Palmerston North, Christchurch and Milton. On its website, Kiwi Bacon Co. Ltd. suggests that the brand has been serving New Zealanders since 1932 but that the Milton factory existed long before this. It was William Henry Hitchon (1872-1957) who started the bacon factory in Milton, which later became known as Hitchon Brothers Bacon Ltd. It is reported that at least two generations of their family worked there before it was purchased by Kiwi Bacon Ltd. However, although Kiwi Bacon is now a nationwide brand, the Milton site was closed in the early 1980s due to its isolated location and the diminishing scale of the town. Despite the closure of the factory, the bacon tradition in Milton was, in a way, temporarily revived in 2008 when a local collector named Rex Spence decided to open the Milton Butchery Museum. While it lasted, the museum was New Zealand’s largest collection of antique cleavers, chopping blocks, photos and many other meat-related things. Apparently, it also featured the country’s most famous sausage maker. For a while, the museum was a popular tourist destination, especially among elderly ladies who had been the ones who used to visit the local butcher, and it became a place of nostalgic reminiscence. Some of the women recalled many of the classic jokes the butchers would have for them, and one women in her 80s retold her story of one butcher asking her if she wanted to hop inside the chiller. She said, “I thought he wanted to have sex with me, but as soon as I got in there he shut me in and stayed in the shop!” Nonetheless, despite its initial success it seems that interest in Milton’s Butchery Museum dwindled, to the extent that it was no long viable to keep open. As things stand today, then, Milton’s famous bacon and butchery past has been cleaved. Our Version of Events With the turn of a new month, we decided it was time for a new exploring trip. This time, though, we wanted to hit New Zealand’s South Island and see what treats it had in store for us. So, after a very late departure from Dunedin, we set off in the direction of Milton. There’s nothing much in Milton these days, as the history above hinted, but two things on the internet did capture our attention: an old bacon factory. Having never been inside a dedicated bacon factory before, it seemed like a potentially interesting explore. Besides, aside from Vegans, Veggies, Pesco-vegetarians, Pollo-Vegetarians, Flexitarians, Cannibal-vegetarians, Lacto-ovo vegetarians, Fruitarians, Raw/Living Foodists, Muslims, some Hindus and Jewish folk, who doesn’t like a bit of bacon? We rolled into Milton in the dead of night, in a very large and conspicuous minibus. We had requested something smaller, like a pigup truck, but they didn’t have any left apparently. The bus was a bit excessive for the three of us, but the upside was that it was roomy and ours for free for a few days. Fortunately, given the size of the vehicle, Milton was exactly like a ghost town, with no cars on the roads or pedestrians on the footpaths, so our bus didn’t attract too much attention. The only life in the small town seemed to be two guys outside the wool mill having a smoke, and a barking dog somewhere in a garden behind us. We spent a good fifteen minutes or so sneaking around in the bushes around the back, trying to find a way inside the factory, but our efforts were in vain… Until, we eventually found an unlikely way of getting inside. Several minutes later, after a bit of breathing in and dodging an old bees nest filled with decaying bee corpses, we were in! Our first glances inside the building revealed that it clearly hadn’t been visited in quite a while. There was a lot of mould covering the floors and furniture, and water had managed to get in through the roof as there were many photogenic green stains on the walls. From the first damp room, we proceeded to tiptoe our way around the building, trying hard to not alert the smokers outside to our presence. This is where torches with high lumen outputs aren’t such an advantage anymore. Of course, as with anyone trying to be stealthy without an adequate light source (we chose not to turn the torches on for a while), we managed to walk over everything that made a significant amount of sound: glass, metal, plastic bags. How the guys outside didn’t hear us we’ll never know. Or maybe they did and just didn’t give a shit? In terms of the explore itself, then, we found that even though it was filled with a large amount of utter shite, it still resembled how we imagined a bacon factory would look. There were large storage areas, chillers and strange tiled rooms. In particular, one room that caught our interest had a large tiled L-shaped bath inside it. It reminded us of something you’d find in a horror film styled abattoir. Even now, since all of us are a bit rusty when it comes to knowledge about butchery equipment, we can’t tell you what it was used for. Aside from the bath, the other interesting things we stumbled across were the old records books, a sizable ‘bacon cauldron’ (our interpretation) and a chat up line: ‘Do you like bacon? Wanna strip?’… Classic. After the bacon banter, it was time to leave. We’d run out of things to look at. The largest room in the building was crammed full of old equipment and most of it wasn’t even butchery-related. Getting out was a lot easier than getting in, and by the time we were back on the street the guys who had been smoking and the sound of the barking dog were long gone. Milton was back to being a ghost town. With that in mind, we decided to take advantage of the silent night and have a quick wander over to the old wool mill nearby to do a bit of investigating and find out whether or not part of it was abandoned. The answer to that question, however, will have to wait. In the meantime, we leave you with some more bacon banter: What do aerobics instructors and people who process bacon have in common? They both tear hams into shreds. Explored with Nillskill and Bane. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19:
  3. Wolverton Works... A great location, explored with the usual great company of Session9, and a non-member. An early start again, and the usual monster breakfast washed down with some coco-pops, or vice versa, too damn early to remember. Without a doubt the funniest access and egress plan to date, I really wish I could mention it and share the photos but it would give away access information. Rosie and Jim were not impressed.... Some history, shamelessly stolen... Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 miles (180 km)-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line. The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. 1. 2. 3. Brew Time 4. 5. A few from the massive hanger-style workshops 6. This one involved a bit of dot-twitching climbing 7. 8. Lil old cart 9. Saw and Tool sharpening room 10. 11. 12. 13. Silver Eagle Disco with nice 5-digit phone number 14. 15. Mini Tractor area 16. Yeah whatever... 17. Rail News from 1988 18. 19. Udders and groovy drain pipe 20. The exit, and on to the second part of the comedy exfiltration... As always, thanks for looking and any feedback always appreciated ïÂÅ
  4. Well here it is; after the insane success of my not that remarkable report on Flamingos/Empire club (huge internet stats on Flickr) at the MK Leisure Plaza, and after I was unable to find a way in, I decided to give Planet Ice another go. I thought that after three weeks the whole lot would be gone, but a photo posted on the Facebook Group “Spotted: Milton Keynes” late last week; I was filled with some hope. From the A5 it was looking bleak. The side of the stripped out bowling club was there, well partly stripped, but it looked like not much remained behind that. When I arrived on the rainy morning to the Retail Park, I saw that pretty much all of Planet Ice remained; but unsure what. After a stroll in, I was certainly not disappointed! Everything was intact, though ancillaries were long gone. The place had an eerie feel to it, it was pretty dim inside and the half demolished building had all sorts of creaks and knocks in the wind. It felt incredible to be inside such a huge imposing sports centre, but also sad as it’s seemed such a waste to see all this equipment get destroyed. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Planet Ice opened along with the Plaza in 1990 as “The Bladerunner Arena”. The Plaza consisted of The Golden Flamingo Nightclub, Megabowl Tenpin and of course the ice rink itself and other various bars and shops such as Homebase and Argos as mentioned in The Empire report. The Bladerunner Arena had 3 licensed bars, one overlooking the ice and one down next to the rink, one within a one if its three function rooms and a restaurant. Other facilities included: an arcade, an ice sports shop, 8 changing rooms and of course; the ice pad itself. The arena regularly sold out during Kings Ice Hockey games which meant that custom was turned away. Several figure skating events and competitions also happened here through the years. The Owners, First Leisure, closed the arena in 1992 but were soon pushed into reopening it by public outcry. The Bladerunner went through another 2 closures, including a final one in 1996. The Ice rink was then mothballed, with local games taking place as far away as Peterborough and Oxford. Rumour has it that staff of the Plaza’s other businesses would go into the mothballed rink during breaks, using it as a large recreation area. The rink remained closed until 1998 when it came under new ownership, and was renamed “Planet Ice”. The Kings Hockey Team reformed in the third tier of English Ice Hockey under the ownership of a local businessmen. The arena was now being used by other hockey teams including: The London Knights Superleague Team. The changing rooms were converted into a luxury dressing room and also an office and gym. As the years went by, the 80s and 90s dream of having an all in one leisure complex dwindled, and Central Milton Keynes thrived. Everything became central so redevelopment of the Leisure Plaza was on the cards for many years. It was finally granted in March 2013. Planet Ice closed its doors on the 13th of July 2013 and is currently being demolished along with Megabowl, The Empire Club and the rest of the complex. A new rink will open in 2014. Many thanks to wiki for ALL of this information which I have used to write my own report. Planet Ice Milton Keynes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Onto the photos, which sadly, many have noise :-/ Finally, check this old tin out! dated 1996! Empire/Flamingo Thread here: http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/6123-The-Empire-Flamingos-MK-Leisure-Plaza-Milton-Keynes-Aug-2013 Thanks for reading, more at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157635543105465/
  5. I heard about this place on The Grapevine, namingly through Northern_Ninja. The Milton Keynes Leisure Plaza was built in 1990 and housed a Bowling Alley (Megabowl), an Ice Rink (Planet Ice, formally Bladerunner), an Argos and a Homebase store and a Nightclub (The Empire, formally Flamingos). The nightclub closed in 2004 and has set ever since. The Bowling Alley and Ice Rink closed this summer for re-development. It appears the ice rink is being left, but everything else here is being demolished. The Leisure Plaza has been through a lot of changes in the last 23 years but has slowly diminished and development is necessary. The Nightclub here appeared to have several themed bars and also a café. Expiry dates of 2004 on a box of crisps gave ideas of closure time. For a derpy place, its actually quite picturesque! I could not find a way into any of the other buildings sadly. I wish I could have done the ice rink, but you never know! I solo'd this one, and the building made some un-nerving noises in the torrential rain! More At: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157635431085507/
  6. 2013: Totally demolished. Still one of my favorite explores. Oh the memories!!! 2012: My report sparks controversy round MK, as the council appeared to lie about the condition of the pool. http://www.miltonkeynes.co.uk/news/local/did-this-need-to-be-demolished-1-4580421 2012: So finally I get to visit this place! Earlier this year I visited with Northern_Ninja off 28 days; But we noticed it was alarmed, so decided to move on, which was a shame. 10 months later, I heard on the grapevine demolition had started so I decided to go solo! This place brings back many memories for me as I used to swim here as a child. I remember the wave machine, the frog shaped foam floats, the siren and lights that used to sound when the wave machine was turned on, the smell of chips from the café and the two flumes, the green one I used to go on, and the red one "that only daddy could go on". Report Building started in November 1989 on the 3.78 Million Pound water centre in Milton Keynes, at the time the name was to be "Over The Rainbow". The first piece of earth was turned by Councillor Bristow, marking the start of construction. The pool was to be far more superior than it actually was, with water slides going in and out of the building, a bridge to the entrance where visitors would enter under a man made rainbow, a licensed bar and foyer area, were all promised at the time of construction, but never came about. However, the pool was still a great family day out nonetheless, and included a 25 metre lane section for the more serious swimmers. Here is a pamphlet from the Dolphin Splashdown Days, when it opened in 1991 Save Dolphin Splashdown Facebook Group Dolphin Splashdown, or by then it was known as Bourton Mills Health and Leisure Club closed due to a fire in 2009 and never reopened. Sainsburys have sealed the planning permission for a new store to built over the road from their brand new "Sainsburys Local" shop. A nice relaxed explore, by no means epic, but this is no derp. Shame its been partly demo'd, and a shame a lot of it is chavved, but its got some awesome photo opportunities! I probably haven't visited here since the mid to late 90s, it looks similar but feels much smaller. Sad to see such a "new" place be demolished. 23 years, or technically 20 is not much for a building like this. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157632167883435/
×