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Found 218 results

  1. A couple of days ago I went up into a local forest to search for a tiny old school. There are no location details online so it kind of was like looking for a needle in a haystack so finding something was better than nothing at all No, the music isn't from Psycho
  2. Since 1961, a one-room grocery store has been operating in the countryside. In the other part of the building lived the shop owners. Later, the store belonged to other people, until 1992, when it left the Russian government, it was closed because it no longer met the requirements of the store. People were still living in the building, when they died, he was abandoned My instagram- laiko_pamirsti
  3. need to add Japan in the flag section still
  4. Polyana, Djantukha and Akarmara - former mining settlements in Abkhazia, located in the Aldzga river valley, 10-12 km east of Tkuarchal. After collapse of the Soviet Union and Abkhaz–Georgian conflict it was almost abandoned.
  5. My name is Suiz, i just recently moved from the Pensacola area into Huntsville. Trying to look for any other explorers in the area that wanna link up.
  6. Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  7. This is inside of a factory that was once used for producing the somewhat famous Pandur-Tanks. This area of the factory closed sometime in 2015/16, with first signs showing as early as 2010. At first the company decided to restructure by stopping production and only using the plant at this location for tank maintenance, service and repair. When this decision was finalized about 60% of employees were dismissed. Reasoning - there wasn't enough demand for new vehicles. In late 2016 the police was called to a so called "illegal rave" that was held in one of the former production halls. Tens of thousands of euros in equipment were left behind. full story 50+ pics DSC_5646 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6939 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5665 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5724 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5739 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6707 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6743_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6812 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  8. Sooo I just got an IR converted D70 (590nm) and I went to test it in the well known Terres Rouges, trying to more or less emulate the Aerochrome look... I'm a it bummed as the lens I used has a hotspot in IR and I didn't notice it before going home... I guess this wont be for anyone's taste ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  9. I didn't go to Romania with the intention for exploring, I went for a good friends wedding and hadn't even looked at the possibility of skulking around a derp. It turns out on our drive up into the mountains of Prahova, there is an abundance of derelict buildings, closed factories and other sundries left over from the communist era - we passed a huge oil refinery that looked half smashed, yet is still in use apparently; Sinaia has a large fuel injection system manufacturing concern that looks disused, but still builds components for the German companies! There was lots if you were looking for it. But, we didn't come for this. We came for a wedding and a break in the mountains - it is a stunning country and I would highly recommend it. It was only after driving back down from the cable car (awesome 70s retro thing) in Sinaia did we notice a large reinforced concrete Berm. I don't think the car had pulled to a stop before I was running into the bushes, forgetting the warnings of black bears. [/span]From what I can make out (information is limited for obvious reasons), but the track was built between 1974 & 1976. Beyond this, I know nothing else other than it may have been still in use as late as 2009. The course had 11-14 turns. Visited with a whole bunch of non-forum members, for obvious reasons! Anyway, photos Start Area - totally trashed! Run up with start ramp (presumably for another sport) Rickety bridge over the mountain road Banked turn just after the bridge (I expect they were flying by this point) Some sort of stores building - there was a smaller start ramp onto the track here, presumably for beginners Final Bend Finish line and timing booth (now someones house)
  10. Disclaimer: Some of the images displayed in my album contain anti semitic graffiti. I'm not promoting anti semitism here but am only showcasing what's inside this bunker. Today's post is about the exploration of a World War II bunker, that has been abandoned since approximately 1955, when Austria signed the Declaration of Neutrality. Construction began during the war but because of the siege of the Red Army, the bunker was never finished. Nowadays, most of the former exits have been walled off with only one proper entry and exit remaining. Rescuing people trapped in certain areas of the facility would be close to impossible, due to some entrances being filled with stones and mud. You imagine bunkers like concrete mazes and even though it looked like one, it was hard to get lost. It was very easy to navigate around even though the tunnels measure about 700m (0.45 miles) in total. Initially, there were around 5 to 7 entrances throughout the whole structure which made it impossible to get lost. DSC_5054 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5080 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5085 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5090 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5124 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6339 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6351 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6353 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6357 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6369 by anthrax, auf Flickr If anyone is interested in more, the full album of photos can be found here and my post about the structure here.
  11. Hello folks! I recently visited an abandoned military barrack which was used by Pioneers for almost a hundred years. The area is abandoned for a few years now, 2015 the buildings were used for accommodation for refugees. Since somewhere around then, the place sits empty. There are already plans on how the area is going to be used once they tore down the remains of the barracks. A new district housing around 2500 people, a school campus and a kindergarten amongst other things will be built here. All that a car-free zone. Can't say I'm too bummed about that, sounds like it could be a sick project! DSC_6434 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6453 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6463 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6478 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6486 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6494 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6512 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6544 by anthrax, auf Flickr If I could excite you for more, check out the full album here or my post about it here.
  12. "Every pro was once an amateur. Every expert was once a beginner. So dream big and start now!" 01 02 03 04 05
  13. Founded in early 1800's the complex was initially used as a hand weaving mill. Following 30 years of manual work the means of production changed when the small mill was bought by a young interpreneur who changed the concept to include hydropower. A few years after that, the mill changed owners again when it was decided to enlargen the mill and convert it into a fully functional factory, instead of a small hydropower driven mill. Successively more and more looms and heavy machinery were added when a textile producer outsourced his production because of monetary advantages. During WW2 the production was stopped and the factory used for producing telecommunication materials for the military. Because of the decline of the texile industry in Europe and outdated machinery the factory had to close for good in the 2000's. Now it's slowly consumed by nature and open for urban explorers like me. Full Album: (70+ photographs) https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669234673708/with/42217673072/ Full Blog Post: http://inwordsandpictures.net/textilefactory DSC_7178 by anthrax, auf Flickr 1 DSC_7224 by anthrax, auf Flickr 2 DSC_7237 by anthrax, auf Flickr 3 DSC_7241_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr 4 DSC_7252 by anthrax, auf Flickr 5 DSC_7259 by anthrax, auf Flickr 6 DSC_7272 by anthrax, auf Flickr 7 DSC_7302 by anthrax, auf Flickr 8 DSC_7308 by anthrax, auf Flickr 9 DSC_7336 by anthrax, auf Flickr 10 DSC_7350 by anthrax, auf Flickr 11 DSC_7382 by anthrax, auf Flickr 12 DSC_7394 by anthrax, auf Flickr 13 DSC_7414 by anthrax, auf Flickr 14 DSC_7425 by anthrax, auf Flickr 15 DSC_7431 by anthrax, auf Flickr 16
  14. Today I visit some kind of factory buildings near a train station. I'm unsure if this was part of some other factory or if those were standalone buildings. One from the two had a cafeteria, so it appears plausible that this was a seperate firm. I'm saying that because the buildings are located on a industrial area where many companies, warehouses and such are located. Enjoy! Full: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmcr8Da
  15. I totally forgot to edit these photos of a recent exploration tour. A friend informed me of an abandoned sawmill by the lake so I had to check it out. On location are many different buildings, one where a family once lived in which is not accessible for the behaved urbexer like me, as no windows were broken into or any locks were picked (or rather, doors knocked down). The sawmill wasn't locked off, so I took my chance there. The main floor was used for wood-working while it looks like the other floor helped power the machines for the main floor by hydropower. I even found remains of a saturday night party of a few friends and a shoe on a table! Full: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmcrd3PL
  16. Not the greatest photos ever, but yeah... mine are the after shots (shown first) and the before shots (shown after) are 25 years old and not mine. I hope that all makes sense
  17. Urban exploration in Japan is called Haikyo which is also the word "ruin" as far as i know. I ve made a few videos and i d like to share them here. please have a look and tell me what u think. PS: why is there no flag tag thingy for japan xD
  18. As i promise i came back on the other day to this wonderfull house, this time someone was there and some of the windows where open. A take some photos with this incredible light. And finally explored the rest of the house, it has some really big rooms, each one more beautiful than the other. I also got a lot of new information on the property. You can read about the first visit here: Now let's go see the house. This is the dinning room, In here the family would dine with a wonderfull view of the river and the city on the other side, with their carved fireplace giving them warm. This room is really big, around 3 to 3 and a half meter tall. This is the most beautifull in my opinion. It would be the living room and also a place to entretain guests. It as a incredible fireplace with carved wood and as views to the front of the house and river, unfortunately the floor is full of pieces of chandelier. This derelict chapel once hosted private prayers, the priest would come from the church every sunday to give it to the count's family. This is the guest room, also very damaged. This is the entrance hall, it has a wonderfull dome covering it, through this doors already passed princes, dukes, counts, Presidents and industry tycoons. This stairs lead to the main bedroom, the iron work in beautifull. Over the stair a rotten skylight let light shine on the old stairs. This is the main bedroom, it as a balcony but is too exposed to the street, in here the last true count died 40 years after the monarchy was abolished. This is the extension that where added to the house in the 30's It's really a wonderfull house, a remainder of a far by gone era. Hope you enjoyed.
  19. This mansion was the home of a local noble family that built it in the end of the XVIII Century, the house was renovated around the time of the First World War and is now abandoned for around 20 years. There where some homeless people living in a section of the house some time ago but their gone now. I could not find more information on the property but i plan to come back for a more complete exploration and to take more Photos. This is the Front Facade, there is coat of Arms but i could'nt reach closer to this Facade. There was a beautiful chapell inside the House but both the cealing and the floor are collapsing. Some of the furniture is still on the house along with multiple photos and documents. In the back we can see the real size of the house. It as a wonderfull view of the city and it's river. It as wonderfull rooms with carved fireplaces but i didnt had the time to explore the entire house. Some photos and paintings and books in the Main Bedroom. I will come back to take better photos and will publish them in a new topic.
  20. History Butternut is a foulwater storage tank in the suburb of Saint Henri. It was built in the 1980's with the increasing population of the local area. Essentially this is two long box sections, divided by pillars every 7 feet and split into 3 sections by 2 trenches for the soup to flow back into the sewerage system. Explore By this point in the week, our numbers were dwindling. Still a fun evening which was finished with mimosas on a friends balcony, before sleeping on said balcony. Although being entirely made of concrete, this was very photogenic. There was plenty of evidence of it's purpose on the floor, but the worms didn't seem to mind. There were hundreds of them. Great end to an epic week. (1) (2) (3) (4) Cheers for Looking
  21. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  22. History It's been pretty hard to find history on this one, especially with all the information being in French Canadian. Located in the Villeray-Saint-Michael-Parc area of Montreal, Saint Bernadine de Sienne was a Catholic church built between 1955 and 1956. As well as providing religious services and confession, the church served as a hub for the local community. It provided room for nurseries, sunday school, youth activities among other community services. With the local community changing, less people regularly attending church and the rising cost of maintenance, Saint Bernadine de Sienne closed it's doors for the last time in April 2017. Explore This was one explore in a week of shenanigans. With 3 Brits, 2 Canadians, an Aussie and a Slovenian, this was very much an international affair. Access was laughable. While in there, photos happened, then we spent a couple of hours pissing around. This is probably the most relaxed I've ever felt in a derp. This is a beautiful building, it'll be a shame if it fell into disrepair or got torn down. I'm not a big fan of religion, but religious structures like churches, temples and mosques can be stunningly beautiful. For a twentieth century church, this was mesmerising and very photogenic. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  23. History The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The original clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them. There have been applications for it to be converted to accommodation, but all plans have been refused so far. Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building. Construction of the original silos in 1903 Explore After a little trouble getting through customs, I was here 3 hours after first stepping foot on Canadian soil. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying. Sadly my experience with customs was more costly than I initially thought. After guiding me to a search room, they tipped the contents of my rucksack out and my lens got damaged. £150 for the repair, and they had loads of questions regarding the contents of my luggage. *Note to self, don't take waders next time*. After an hour and a half, I was on the bus to my friend's apartment. This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners. The local explorers have done an admirable job making this their own. They've cleared areas for social events, clear walkways for people to get around safely and have added features, like a wood burner and a bar. Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) Cheers for Looking
  24. Made by a bunch of Melbourne Cave Clan members and used by even more Melbourne Cave Clan members. It was so much fun. Definitely worth doing on a waterway near you It's a bit epic, but maybe someone out there will enjoy a look.
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