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  1. Evening all, hope we are all having a lovely juan. right it's been a week since RAWs went up and its been a couple o' few weeks since my last report so thought i'd fire something up from weekend before last weekends 36 hour hop into france. pretty banging 36 hours really, got round a prison, a chateau and then went to an awesome party, more than most normal people get done in 36 hours anyway History. -right i just spent about 20mins digging through old reports trying to find some half decent history on the place which i could steal but cant see much about, all i found is that the place closed in 2011 and housed around 1500 inmates. As you will see the place is well buggered now, absolutely trashed and covered head to toe in graff, that said i cant speak for the womens side as we didn't get in there. The explore. Explored with Maniac, the_raw and elliot5200. Twas an early start on the morn of our departure and after good floor kipping session at the behest of mr manics hospitality we were well on our way to the tunnel. Landed in the general area of the prison around 11 and after picking up some lunch supplies and wandering around a car park looking for a bog for 20 mins we headed off towards the prison, as most will know there's a lovely little group of romany gypsys planted in the car park of the prison, heard stories of explorers getting corned in cells by them and shit so were a little bit on the ball, kept a a keen eye on the carpark as we scooted around to the access the place is pretty much wheelchair friendly now which made life easy but will have also lended to the reasons the place is so buggered. Once inside the main building we all kind of wandered off and got our shots, nothing particularly exciting went down, bumped into a few french explorers, had lunch at the centre of were the wings meet up, i got a boner when i found a puddle and that was about it. As trashed as it is i really enjoyed our few hour mooch in here, something a bit different, definitely would have been nice to get in the womens section but we were in a bit of a rush as we wanted to tick off a chateau before heading to our party destination. So yeah that was about it, no medieval style clashes with pikeys, no seccas chases, no horrific accidents-no ghosts, just a nice little mooch around an empty prison taking photos, smoking fags and eating chess n ham namwiches could have spent longer here i reckon, we saw a ladder for the roof but needed to get on the road to our next destination so skipped that, i'd defo go again if i was in the area. As for the infamous H15 carpark gypsies, i honestly think they are so used to people going in there the couldnt give a flying funk any more. Explorers and graffers have been going in for a few years now, we saw 2 possibly 3 other groups of french explorers in there as well as us- and that was just in the space of 2/3 hours. I hadn't seen a report for a while but this place obviously still major tour bus, just think the gypos are past caring who's snooping about, i blatantly got spotted up a watch tower by one of them and he didn't bat an eye. right then, on with a load of very similar pics of cell blocks with loads of infinity lines and wonky symmetry : P my sensor is pissed in my camera so horizontal parallel lines taper one side-AND ITS CLUCKIN WELL ANNOYING!! Graff on the way in Portrait with bogs in nets Cell internal w/ BOG Top floor landing Cell internal graff face Cage to wings from central hub Ground shot with naturally back lit netting wide hallway with holding cells Holding cell Stairway to landing Peeley paint radiator S**t house Ariel dick Cells from landing cell internal Cell door awesome landing Stairs one for the reflection selection Thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy
  2. My take on Prison 15H and from what I gather there is going to be a fair few from this place coming to a forum near you Soon! Thanks to Phantom Bish and Camera shy for the Intel. Cheers guys. Seems we where out the same weekend as Mr Bish but missed him by a day.. Early morning start and a Euro tunnel trip purely to do this place and then home intime for tea..This is an advantage of living 45 mins from the Euro tunnel, met many euro explorers while in the place and some well kitted up graffers on the way out.,Other than that no problems where had,even the Gypo colony in the car park wasn’t an issue.. Enough bollox from me and here’s 15 of the 230 odd I took 60% of them I was happy with but no one wants to see a apic heavy report of the place!! Explored with Sx-riffraff,Obscurity,Spaceinvader and Urban Ginger
  3. Glen Parva was constructed on the site of the former Glen Parva Barracks in the early 1970s as a borstal and has always held young offenders. Since its opening in 1974 the establishment has seen considerable expansion and change and now serves a catchment area of over 100 courts, holding a mixture of sentenced, unsentenced, and remand prisoners. In 1997, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons walked out of an inspection at Glen Parva because conditions were so bad. After a subsequent inspection a year later, the report stated that there was "hope for the future" for the prison but added that a lot of work still needed to be done, and recommended that some staff should be moved because of their attitude towards inmates. Our Explore: Late night mission to this place made the entry a slight more easy then in the daylight, secca made this explore a lot more challenging haha! but a shame it had to be in the dark and access to most of the rooms made me see only a slight percentage of this place. but i seen what i wanted to thankfully! And cheers to the lot that helped! Enjoy the pics the few of them the rest are for the archives
  4. Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy.... It was the site of a controversial decades-long dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical weapons research projects involving testing on inmates. The prison is also notable for several major riots in the early 1970s. The prison was home to several trials which raised several ethical and moral questions pertaining to the extent to which humans can be experimented on. In many cases, inmates chose to undergo several inhumane trials for the sake of small monetary reward. The prison was viewed as a human laboratory. “All I saw before me were acres of skin. It was like a farmer seeing a fertile field for the first time.” Dr. X One inmate described experiments involving exposure to microwave radiation, sulfuric and carbonic acid, solutions which corroded and reduced forearm epidermis to a leather-like substance, and acids which blistered skin in the testicular areas. In addition to exposure to harmful chemical agents, patients were asked to physically exert themselves and were immediately put under the knife to remove sweat glands for examination. In more gruesome accounts, fragments of cadavers were stitched into the backs of inmates to determine if the fragments could grow back into functional organs. So common was the experimentation that in the 1,200-person prison facility, around 80% to 90% of inmates could be seen experimented on. The rise of testing harmful substances on human subjects first became popularized in the United States when President Woodrow Wilson allowed the Chemical Warfare Service (CAWS) during World War I. All inmates who were tested upon in the trials had consented to the experimentation, however, they mostly agreed for incentives like monetary compensation. Experiments in the prison often paid around $30 to $50 and even as much as $800. “I was in prison with a low bail. I couldn’t afford the monies to pay for bail. I knew that I wasn’t guilty of what I was being held for. I was being coerced to plea bargain. So, I thought, if I can get out of this, get me enough money to get a lawyer, I can beat this. That was my first thought.” I expected to find an epic medical ward only to be filled with disappointment. The practice was so common I can only assume it was conducted everywhere. Many advocates of the prison trials, such as Solomon McBride, who was an administrator of the prisons, remained convinced that there was nothing wrong with the experimentation at the Holmesburg prison. McBride argued that the experiments were nothing more than strapping patches of cloth with lotion or cosmetics onto the backs of patients and argued this was a means for prisoners to earn an easy income. The negative public opinion was particularly heightened by the 1973 Congressional Hearing on Human Experimentation. The hearing was supposed to discuss the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and clarify the ethical and legal implications of human experimental research. This climate called for a conscious public which rallied against the use of vulnerable populations such as prisoners as guinea pigs. Companies and organizations who associated themselves with human testing faced severe backlash. Amidst the numerous senate hearings, public relation nightmares, and opponents to penal experimentation, county prison boards realized human experimentation was no longer acceptable to the American public. Swiftly, human testing on prisoners was phased out of the United States. Only a renovated gymnasium is considered suitable for holding inmates. That building is frequently used for overflow from other city jails. The district attorney launched an extensive two year investigation documenting hundreds of cases of the rape of inmates. The United States had ironically been strong enforcers of the Nuremberg Code and yet had not followed the convention until the 1990s. The Nuremberg code states: “[T]he person involved should have legal capacity to give consent; should be so situated as to be able to exercise free power of choice, without the intervention of any element of force, fraud, deceit, duress, overreaching, or other ulterior form of constraint or coercion; and should have sufficient knowledge and comprehension of the elements of the subject matter involved as to enable him to make an understanding and enlightened decision.” The prison trials violated this definition of informed consent because inmates did not know the nature of materials they were experimented with and only consented due to the monetary reward. America’s shutting down of prison experimentation such as those in the prison signified the compliance of the Nuremberg Code of 1947. You look so precious.
  5. Headed over to Hull for a solo visit when I got wind of an 'abandoned prison'. I didn't expect too much and the place isn't anything special but has a few ok bits. Brief History Sutton Place was a reformatory prison for young offenders in the criminal justice system deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others. The facility was opened in 1992 and achieved "Outstanding" status by government inspectors. The secure unit had 10 beds and provided services for boys and girls up to 17 years old. The facility closed in 2009 after the Youth Justice Board decided not to renew the units £1.8million contract. 1. External in the courtyard 2. Ball in courtyard 3. External 4. Boy's wing 5. Cell corridor 6. Inside a cell 7. Inside a cell 8. Communal area 9. Communal area 10. Sports hall 11. Famous people on sports hall wall 12. External
  6. Hi guys and girls off course , My set of this prison. It was in quite good state, not much decay. I like my prisons in heavy decay, but some photos turned out to be nice. Pictures were shot in april 2015 These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr These walls are closing in on me by Matthias Mertens, on Flickr
  7. The first time I saw pictures of this place it made such an impression that I had to try go there. I heard the stories about the notorious gypsy camp outside and the random police training with dogs and guns... However, on a bright morning there we were in Northern France - the first location on what was my first Eurotour. I felt a mixture of things - slight apprehension, massive anticipation and spaced out due to lack of sleep! We managed to get in without too much drama and soon bumped into 4 other UK explorers. Here are the pics from the main section of the prison which is the most-photographed 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Its well-documented that there are 2 separate sections which make up this prison and in-between runs this piece of 'no-mans-land' 10. Sometimes lady luck shines down and so it was - we had timed it perfectly so that access was also possible into the lesser-known section which is either lower risk or female inmates depending on who/what you believe. There was a lot more to see in this bit than just rows of cells covered in graffiti.... 11. 12. 13. 14. 15 &16 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. As I took this pic I thought how ironic it was that we were determined to get into a place that housed so many that would do anything to get out of! And so it was time to leave, and as we did we noticed a couple of dodgy characters from the camp seemed to be following us. Again we were lucky (and relieved) as we bumped into the other 4 explorers and with strength in numbers we got back to the car in very good spirits!
  8. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  9. Had to visit this, as it’s on the proverbial doorstep, and I can’t believe I didn’t know about this one. I’d missed out on the group’s previous day’s exploits, but at least I got something in, even if I was a bit unprepared. Enjoyed this atmospheric place. Don’t be fooled by the photos – it was quite dark in there. All taken with no torch, but around 30 second exposures. Explore with Auntieknickers, The Stig & KM Punk Saw the mortuary, but unfortunately didn’t get any photos… the police turned up, so we made a retreat. St. Mary’s was originally a work house and later turned into a hospital, this place, unlike most others, retained some of it's original features from it's Workhouse origins. The whole Vagrant's block had been retained. Why they did this was unclear, but a small section of this small block was converted into a small Mortuary that would service both St Mary's and Melton Mowbray cottage hospitals. thanks for looking
  10. An abandoned prison in Northern France, constructed in 1906 and used until 2005. Despite stories of this place becoming more and trashed by the day I've still always wanted to see it for myself. Arrived late morning with maniac, merry prankster and elliot5200. We avoided the gypsy camp on the way in which was a slight worry beforehand but needn't have been, they seem to be past caring now that there's nothing left to salvage. We only made it into the men's side of the complex as the less trashed women's section was sealed on this occasion. The main wing has suffered from the worst damage, tagged from top to bottom and anything that can be ripped off has been trashed. Aside from that the rest of the joint makes for a good wander. Yes there is still tagging but also some decent graff dotted around, peely paint galore, and ultimately loads of prison cells in various states of decay. It's certainly a fun place to photograph and a novel place to have a picnic. Anyway we spent 2 or 3 hours in there until we felt we'd done our time..... Onto the pics....of which there are quite a few 1. 2. Main wing 3. 4. At one point we thought Indiana Jones had joined us but sadly it was just boring old Maniac.... 5. 6. Heading for the smaller wings 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Pics of cars on the wall, perhaps looking at page 3 cut outs gets a bit much when you're facing years of celibacy.... 12. 13. The impressive dome roof at the centre of the complex 14. Each wing had different coloured walls 15. 16. 17. Over grown prison yard with basketball court 18. 19. The most intact cells we came across 20. Above one of the small wings 21. Some cool bits of graff about the place amongst the other garbage 22. 23. 24. 25. Watch Tower 26. The women's side, sadly it was sealed on this trip but there's always a next time. Elliot's already signed up for pole vaulting tuition. Thanks for looking
  11. A rainy Sunday afternoon, out for a drive and decided a chance my luck on visiting a prison I had known about for a good while, but knew it had on site security. Fuck it I thought, chance my luck and drive up to the gate, called the number and Mr Secca Man was happy to give me the keys and wander around this lovely little prison for a couple hours. Signing myself into the log book, I asked him if anyone had been in before me, naw he said, your the first! I think he was happy for the company and chat, must be quite a boring job! Not much decay for my tastes, but since it is due for demolition soon, it could be my last chance. The Officers / Admin House The Prison Thanks for looking!
  12. A small, decaying prison. Meoww! WHAT IS! 1 2 3 4
  13. a look inside former HMP Kingston in Portsmouth. built in 1877 as a Victorian radial design prison. Kingston has had a varied history. At one point the building was used for a boys' borstal, and then became a police station during World War II. In 1965 capital punishment for murder was abolished in Britain and Kingston began exclusively to hold inmates serving life sentences. Kingston was the only prison in England and Wales to have a unit exclusively for elderly male prisoners serving life sentences. The prison then later closed in 2013 These photos were taken during an open day for the residents of Portsmouth to give their input of what to do with the site, it was an interesting walk around with lots of history inside. Enjoy Thanks For Looking
  14. History Palmerston North Police Station, originally one of four stations in the city, was completed in 1938 at a cost of £30,000, and operated up until 2005. The existing building was built on the site of the former wooden Victorian era police station and, in keeping up with modernist ideas and technologies sweeping across the county at the time, its design included seismic resistant concrete. Respectable structural engineers from California, Japan and New Zealand worked in partnership to implement and advance the use of reinforced concrete throughout its construction. The building is also based on a stripped classical style, which restricts the use of classical design elements (i.e. columns, decorations and pediments), and much of the exterior is plastered over to exhibit imitation stone joints. At the time, Palmerston North was considered to be an exemplary example of a modern police station in the southern hemisphere, and it attracted much attention from the Australian State Police who requested the site’s plans to assist in the construction of their own stations across the Tasman. It was reported that the police station stood to represent efficiency and subsequently a large number of cells, most equip with a toilet and some with a shower, were incorporated into the building’s design, alongside living quarters and other areas for staff. Interestingly, after the closure of the former Palmerston Police Station crime, between 2006-2010, rose significantly and the overall rate for the city was equal to the rest of New Zealand as a whole; although crime rates have dropped in more recent years. What began as nothing more than a small clearing in a forest, formerly occupied by indigenous Maori communities, the city of Palmerston North has risen to become one of the fastest growing cities in New Zealand. Since the arrival of British and Scandinavian Europeans, the area has been entirely transformed and as the forests disappeared farmlands and cityscape began to appear. Our Version of Events Well folks, it happened, we finally found ourselves holed up in a police station, and an especially grim one at that. Three people or more to most cells, traditional plastic coated foam mattresses, one shared stainless steel toilet (with an incorporated sink on top), a shower if you’re lucky, graffiti from former inmates, and a peep hole for the guards to watch you taking a shit. As we arrived in the city police presence was tremendously high, and as we discovered the new police station is only a few hundred metres down the road. Nevertheless, we managed to amble on inside and the explore was excellent. Although it’s mostly stripped, many of the original features survive and you get a good feel for what it would be like being a ‘bad-guy’ in one of the old Robocop films. The graffiti inside the cells is incredible; a mixture of former gang members’, general ‘bad-guys’’ and Maori captives’ thoughts and feelings. There’s a certain sense of satisfaction to be had being able to see police officers walking outside the windows and watching them move about the street when you pop your head over the edge of the rooftop. Explored with Nillskill and Zort. 1: Palmerston North Police Station 2: Coat of arms 3: Old paperwork 4: Small cell 5: Large cell 6: Peep hole for the guards (opposite the toilet inside the cell) 7: Willy Mitford (research him, there's a good story) 8: Viva La Revolution 9: The other end of a larger cell 10: Stainless steel toilet and sink 11: Corridor to cells 12: Toilet roll and bar of soap (one for each cell, after that you're using your hand) 13: Fume cupboard 14: Examination/evidence sink 15: Steve Irwin 16: Booking room (looking down into the cell blocks) 17: Temporary holding cell 18: Booking room 19: Print room 20: Front of the station (the public side) 21: Map of Palmerston North (inside the chief's office) 22: Main reception (for the innocent folk) 23: Main reception and front door 24: Upstairs (staff area) 25: Staff bar 26: Palmerston North Main Street 27: The new police station 28: Behind the reception booth 29: A very large camera 30: Prisoner drop-off area
  15. "Steal a little and they throw you in jail, Steal a lot and they make you a king." 01 02 03 04 05 06 07
  16. What a great explore, 5 am, alarmclock, wake up! 6 am, fck i felt asleep again, hurry! Great way to start your day, next problem. We got the location, but is it the right one? Driving through germany we found a prison, why are there so many cars and why does it looks different? Park the car and check it out, till a nice German women, who was working at that prison, asked us through the speakers to nicely get the fuck out of there. Wrong prison... after a couple of minutes we found the right one, park the car and easy acces. Wow, nice building Wrong camera settings in the first 10 pics, who gives a ####, we finally made it. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 Sorry for the 29 pics, i love prisons as long as i can get out whenever i want to.
  17. after almost 4 months of inactivity it was time again to hit the road and finally here that click click click again Started at this location #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 You can see more of this at https://flic.kr/s/aHsk8VJwKo
  18. :D Coole Geschichte zu diesem Ort Die Bearbeitung finde ich ein wenig zu hart aber sonst echt schön 4sights die Wärterin, tzähhhh korrupt, bestechlich und Türen öffnend 1. Prison 19H 01 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 2. Prison 19H 02 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 3. Prison 19H 03 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 4. Prison 19H 04 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 5. Prison 19H 05 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 6. Prison 19H 06 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 7. Prison 19H 07 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 8. Prison 19H 08 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 9. Prison 19H 09 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 10. Prison 19H 10 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 11. Prison 19H 11 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 12. Prison 19H 12 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 13. Prison 19H 13 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 14. Prison 19H 14 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 15. Prison 19H 15 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 16. Prison 19H 16 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 17. Prison 19H 17 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 18. Prison 19H 18 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 19. Prison 19H 19 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 20. Prison 19H 20 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr
  19. A large prison in France that closed in 2011. It had space for 1500 inmantes and supposedly its split into male and female sections however I am not fully sure if this is a fact. There was quite a bit of graffitti here and I think some of it added to the location. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Thanks for looking, i tried to show a different side to the prison here. If you want to see the more obvious shots check out H15 on my website.
  20. Already built in the late 19th century. Also political prisoners were incarcerated here. Mid-20th century it was closed and used as a museum. Abandoned and in decay since the Romanian Revolution of 1989. Normally the prison is guarded and not easily unseen accessible, because the guardian lives directly on the site. But fortunately the guard was not at home and a hole in the wall gave access into the building... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 (Not a fake, the rays are real.) 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  21. Abandoned since 1986 this derelict prison camp located in a remote area of the North Island in New Zealand barely resembles a prison. The prison is heavily decayed with surprisingly little vandalism, the prisons strange colour schemes were meant to help calm prisoners. Our road trip taking us to this prison began with a sunny 18 degrees, five hours later we were in snow, this place had a very somber feeling to it. Cheers for looking at our explores in New Zealand, sorry if it was a little picture heavy! More here: http://urbexcentral.com/2014/05/20/waikune/
  22. Visited with Donna as the last stop on the Lock Stock and 2 Smokin Outfits Tour! We had heard that the Women’s Wing of the prison that had been sealed on my 2 previous visits here was once again open… We took a chance and thankfully the information was correct and we spent the morning looking around that side before making our way over to the men’s side to grab a few shots and see how bad things had got there… Really glad I managed to see the rest of this place, the Women’s side was at the point of this visit in much better condition than the men’s side, the evidence of the Police firearms training by way of spent shotgun shells, flash bang grenades and targets riddled with bullets made for an interesting twist . One of the highlights had to be the silver cell featured below, someone had sprayed the entire room silver top to bottom including all fixtures and fittings! there was a note saying take photos but do not damage on the outside of the door . 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Just before I left I was detained by the french police ... 17. Larger, higher res versions of these and more photos from this location on my blog post: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2014/05/06/urbex-prison-h15-france-march-2014-revisit-2/ Thanks for looking
  23. Afternoon all, Last stop on our first full day in a bit of a downpour was this location which is getting a lot of traffic now. Not much here besides some nice stairs and a few other details but was worth the last hour or so before heading to our hotel for the evening. This is one of a few buildings in the same complex that remains abandoned, the rest of the site was refurbished and some people were living in some of them and some were empty. Thanks for looking in.
  24. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
  25. This has been closed for some time. 75% of the site has already been converted into flats. I think these will be next. The place is completely stripped with literally nothing left inside apart from a few good corridor shots. The cells are in a little out building and are really dated. A really easy explore and was busy with other explorers and model photo shoots. Thank You!
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