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Found 11 results

  1. History Butternut is a foulwater storage tank in the suburb of Saint Henri. It was built in the 1980's with the increasing population of the local area. Essentially this is two long box sections, divided by pillars every 7 feet and split into 3 sections by 2 trenches for the soup to flow back into the sewerage system. Explore By this point in the week, our numbers were dwindling. Still a fun evening which was finished with mimosas on a friends balcony, before sleeping on said balcony. Although being entirely made of concrete, this was very photogenic. There was plenty of evidence of it's purpose on the floor, but the worms didn't seem to mind. There were hundreds of them. Great end to an epic week. (1) (2) (3) (4) Cheers for Looking
  2. History It's been pretty hard to find history on this one, especially with all the information being in French Canadian. Located in the Villeray-Saint-Michael-Parc area of Montreal, Saint Bernadine de Sienne was a Catholic church built between 1955 and 1956. As well as providing religious services and confession, the church served as a hub for the local community. It provided room for nurseries, sunday school, youth activities among other community services. With the local community changing, less people regularly attending church and the rising cost of maintenance, Saint Bernadine de Sienne closed it's doors for the last time in April 2017. Explore This was one explore in a week of shenanigans. With 3 Brits, 2 Canadians, an Aussie and a Slovenian, this was very much an international affair. Access was laughable. While in there, photos happened, then we spent a couple of hours pissing around. This is probably the most relaxed I've ever felt in a derp. This is a beautiful building, it'll be a shame if it fell into disrepair or got torn down. I'm not a big fan of religion, but religious structures like churches, temples and mosques can be stunningly beautiful. For a twentieth century church, this was mesmerising and very photogenic. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  3. History The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The original clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them. There have been applications for it to be converted to accommodation, but all plans have been refused so far. Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building. Construction of the original silos in 1903 Explore After a little trouble getting through customs, I was here 3 hours after first stepping foot on Canadian soil. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying. Sadly my experience with customs was more costly than I initially thought. After guiding me to a search room, they tipped the contents of my rucksack out and my lens got damaged. £150 for the repair, and they had loads of questions regarding the contents of my luggage. *Note to self, don't take waders next time*. After an hour and a half, I was on the bus to my friend's apartment. This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners. The local explorers have done an admirable job making this their own. They've cleared areas for social events, clear walkways for people to get around safely and have added features, like a wood burner and a bar. Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) Cheers for Looking
  4. The colliery Saint Fontaine was opened in 1908. For the extraction of hard coal, they dug to a depth of 1037 meters. In the 1960s, up to two million tons of hard coal were mined. In 1972 the colliery was closed for the first time, but in 1976 the operation was resumed. In 1986, the final closure, whereupon a large part of the buildings were demolished. Today, apart from the listed tower, only the administrative building including the locker room / pithead baths exists. In recent years, unfortunately, there was a lot of vandalism; last the ceiling lamps were destroyed by some idiots. In Saint Fontaine, there were repeated fatal accidents. On 3 January 1933, 36 miners were killed in a gas explosion. On May 29, 1959, another 26 workers were killed in another explosion. On September 23, 1968, three miners smothered. Visited with @The_Raw. 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  5. Hello again! Possibly the most documented urbex building in the UK so theres no need for history, just check out the hundreds of other reports. I've legit done this place to death, seen every part other than a few rooms which are always locked. St Josephs hosted a recent meet up myself and -Raz- attended and that was a quality day with Mars Lander, Hank Moody and others. A personal Favourite photo, can anyone spot Raz? Photos from various explores; If you got this far, thanks for reading
  6. Brief History of St Joseph's Seminary St Joseph's College, Upholland is a Former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building was laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated. St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. The first Junior Seminary of the Diocese was founded at St Edward's College in 1842 as a Catholic 'classical and commercial school' under the direction of the secular clergy and was established in Domingo House, a mansion in Everton. Its President for the next forty years was to be Monsignor Provost John Henry Fisher. When the Junior Seminarians moved to St Joseph's the school was taken over by the Christian Brothers (who also ran St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell) and continues to this day and now serves as the Liverpool Cathedral Choir School. In recognition of the heritage owed to St Edward's College one of the two chapels at Upholland was consecrated as the St Edward the Confessor Chapel. Along with the other main seminary in the north of England, Ushaw candidates for the priesthood studied and were ordained at the college. Up until the second Vatican Council boys as young as 11 years of age entered the Junior Seminary before progressing to the senior Seminary at 18. In 1972 following the changes of Vatican 2 the two junior seminaries of St Joseph's and Ushaw merged at Upholland, and in 1975, with declining numbers of men from Ireland offering themselves for the (now) Archdiocese of Liverpool the Senior seminary moved to Ushaw. St Joseph's continued to offer boarding school education for boys considering a vocation until 1987. Following the end of the seminary training and boarding education St Joseph's became home to the Northern Institute and was used as a retreat and conference centre for the Archdiocese under the leadership of Msgr John Devine. The election of Archbishop Patrick Kelly saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether and the property was sold to Anglo International who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed RC Seminary to 92 apartments, with 220 new build enabling units. The major controversies of the decision were the ongoing financial viability of St Joseph's (it had just started to make a small surplus under Devine's management) and the sale and disposal of the art and artefacts in the college, much of which had been donated by various parishes and people of the Archdiocese who were not offered their donations back. My visit to St Joseph’s Seminary - Visited with Venustas After an unsuccessful visit a few weeks before myself and Venustas just could not resist the pull of St Joes and we just had to try again. So, an early start was arranged and before we knew it we was back! Now this place is notorious for the ‘on the ball’ security and even more for the high pitched killer alarm. Trust me when I say that when that thing goes off all you want to do is curl up in a ball with your hands over your ears whimpering for your mummy. It sure is an assault on your eardrums. This place has been classed as a suicide explore due to the fact that going here you know you have a high chance of being caught at some point. So that said, the main goal of this trip other than getting the photos we needed was to not set off the alarm or get caught by security. We was in just as the light was starting to flood in through the windows which was great timing as St Joes really needs light to help show it’s real beauty. So after a 5 minute break to catch our breath we headed off into the maze of hallways and rooms checking for sensors as we went and started snapping photos of this amazing location. Here are a few photos of some of the hallways. This place is full of hallways of all shapes and sizes. Now, one of the first rooms we stumbled across that we had seen in other reports was the ‘Red Room’ After taking a few snaps in the Red Room we moved on walking down even more hallways and checking out dozens of small rooms that looked like dorm rooms. Each room looked identical with a small fire and some type of storage for clothing and belongings. Then we found the ‘Squirrel Room’ aptly named as there is a dried out squirrel on the window sill. By the looks of it i would say that it was a male! Now, just after the last photo above was taken we realised that we was locked in the room! We had heard the door shut behind us but thought nothing of it as doors have handles on right? Wrong! this one did not. Instantly we both thought … Oh Shit! As we was on the 2nd floor and the window not being one that can open the door was our only exit so we quickly realised unless we can get this door open we will either have to damage the door panel to get out or do the unthinkable and call security! Neither of which we wanted to do. We looked where the handle should have been and could see the small square metal bar that goes into the handle. It had been pushed through and almost of out the other side. We started to look for something that we could grip it with but crumbly plaster and peeling paint was of no help! Then, Venustas pulled out two £1 coins and with his what i call a Gorilla grip used them on the bar like a pair of tweezers. As he twisted the bar I pulled on the hanger attached to the door and to our joy we was free! Thank goodness the latch was not rusted! Oh and Venustas’s gorilla grip. So after a few moments of laughter and joking about what had just happened we move on through this monster of a location. We knew the main areas that we wanted to see but trying to find them soon became apparent that luck would play a huge part in if we was successful. Today lady luck seemed to be on our side when we stumbled across the library which has the spiral staircase. So after a few snaps of the stairs up we went. This room was my favourite from the day, it was quite, out of the way and it held a nice calm feeling to it which was the perfect place to take a break and plan out our next route to explore. It was obviously part of the library below as you will see there are shelves on both sides of the room that would have been full of books. Also, there is a ladder to help you get the books you need and a study table. This table I named the ‘guestbook’ as previous explorers have added their name to it. I am now proud to say that ours are also part of the guestbook. So after walking down a few more corridors and checking even more rooms lady luck struck again. Out of nowhere the dorm room appeared. I have always loved the look of this room from the day I looked at it on someone's report. It is nowhere near as in good condition as it use to be from older reports but this place still has a beauty to it. The names of the people who used this dorm are still on the cubicle fronts. So after grabbing a few shots we decided it was time to move on if we wanted to cover as much as possible before we had to go. After walking around for a while we came across this staircase that connected on to a room with a crazy checkerboard ceiling. Just to the right of the stairs was the study hall. Next up we found what we thought must be classed as a small chapel but we might be wrong. This room was small but really nice in decor. Now with us finding the small chapel we knew we had to be close to the holy grail that is the main Chapel. The main chapel was our end goal as we knew that when we enter that area there is a high chance that we would set of one of the remote sensors and all hell would break loose on our eardrums. We decided that we was happy with the amount we had seen and said lets go. So after about 10 minutes of looking for the chapel entry we found it, held our breath and stepped in ……. wait for the attack of sound ….. any minute now …. NOTHING! Not a peep. Well that was a surprise, so we started snapping away before security arrived. We said to each other get the shots we need before we get escorted off. So off to work we went, snapping shots from all angles and we even found the bell tower. Now to our utter surprise of no alarm also came the surprise of no security presence arriving we was in total amazement. With all shots taken that we wanted from this area we left and headed off to a less obvious area to way up our next move. We knew we was happy with what we had seen so far but decided to walk a few more corridors before leaving this amazing place. We even walked the cellars that was used for storage and from the evidence we found brewing their own wine and spirits! After that we decided it was time to go. The day had gone better than we could have hoped for, we had not set off the alarm and no security had collared us. We made it to our exit point packed up our gear and headed out. A few moments later Venustas wanted to get some external shots and we knew that security is right at the point where we wanted to take the photo. We both agreed and said sod it, we walked right out into plain sight of security and the CCTV and got the shots we needed then turned round and walked down the path. 30 seconds later security arrived in his car. We got the usual speech and then went merrily on our way after an amazing 5 hours inside exploring. Crazy getting ourselves caught right? Probably, but the external definitely finished the day off. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of St Joseph’s Seminary on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157646885632357/ Final thoughts St Josephs is by far the best explore I have been on and I feel it will take some beating without leaving the UK for places such as France & Belgium. Don’t get me wrong there are some great locations within the UK but St Joseph’s had so much to offer and the sheer size of this place can keep you coming back time and again and each time you would definitely see something new. So I don’t think I should say farewell to St Joes but see you soon! Thanks for reading, Dugie
  7. Val Saint Lambert is a Belgian crystal glassware manufacturer, founded in 1826. Val St Lambert is the official glassware supplier to H.M. King Albert II of Belgium. We were a bit sick of the sight of razor wire on this trip and nearly turned back when we found it protecting this old factory. Thankfully it didn't take us long to figure out a way past it and it was worth the effort. Once inside it was a nice chilled wander and good to see something a bit different. Before we left we found a way into the live bit of the site which had far more stuff lying around in the dark, I didn't get many photos in there as we had didn't have time for light painting but easily could've spent another couple of hours in there. Plants taking over Crystal glasses Tongs and tools hanging up Couple of random cool bits of graffiti dotted around Inside the more active side, rooms full of machine parts.... With no tunnels in sight Wevsky was a bit bored until we found him a dead frog to play with : Thanks for looking
  8. When I came walking in this chapel and was stunned by the beauty. This was also my first experience with a tripod, and other camera function as "supiriour automatic" on my Sony DSC HX200. After an hour we walked in some people who were working in the basement, and they "gently" told us to leave Now the monastry has been renovated into students homes, and the chapel is used for weddings and party's. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7:
  9. This is my first post but I have been on several explorations. The first few I didn't take pictures just went with born2misbehave. Took a like to the exploring and wanted to capture the experiences for myself. So with new camera in hand me and born2misbehave had a ride to coleshill to have a look around the Farther Hudson Society. The first building was Saint Edwards home for boys. So we popped in and had a good couple of hours exploring. We never made it into any of the other buildings due to the presence of the local priest. Maybe next time. History Father Hudson’s Society was founded by Father George Vincent Hudson. Father Hudson was born in 1873 at Kinsham in the parish of Bredon, Worcestershire. He studied for the priesthood at St. Mary’s College Oscott and was ordained in 1898. A week after his ordination he was sent to Coleshill as parish priest. Development of the Father Hudson’s Society Complex to the south of the centre of Coleshill began in 1905 when work began on St. Edward’s, a large boy’s home for Catholic children. The site expanded and developed until the 1940’s and eventually included its own hospital, nurses’ home, cottage homes, offices, a church and several chapels and three convents for the nuns who worked on the site. Changes in patterns of social care meant that most of the residential buildings had become redundant by the 1980’s and the hospital and school closed at the end of the 20th century. Many buildings are now empty and there are proposals to redevelop part of the site, which is in a Conservation Area. Apart from the Grade II listed church to the south and the former offices to the north, none of the buildings are considered to be of architectural significance. The present proposals include more demolition than a Development Brief adopted by the local authority in 2005 but the basic principles remain. For a variety of reasons it is not felt that the proposals will have a detrimental impact on the character of this slightly unusual Conservation Area.
  10. On with the European Trespass Tour....A fantastic location with yet another religious site with accusations of child abuse never the less sweeping its corrupt history under the chapel carpet on with the pics ,visited with the usual suspects ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 13. Next stop The Christallerie a little gem kind of reminds me of George Barnsleys in the U.K. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Cheers for looking Oldskool.................
  11. As promised, here's my report on "the bright saint"... It must have been one of my coolest explores from last year. At the time of the visit, this enormous monastery had been abandoned for a few years and even though there were many ideas what to do with it, till then they didn't really make a clear decision yet. We had the location on the list for a while, but were unable to find an entrance. Till one day we noticed some pictures starting to appear online. We quickly gathered our stuff and went back... One of the side-builings had a broken window, so obviously that was the starting point. However, since this place is huge, it took us a while to find the correct route... From building to building, over the roofs, thru very small windows and gaps till we eventually ended up on the second floor of the right building. Then, when we opened the door to the church, we were simply shocked by it's beauty... We stood there for a while, admiring the quietness and the awesomeness of this location. After a few minutes we grabbed our gear and started shooting... A little bit of history: This place was built in the beginning of the 19th century and was used till 2001. It expanded a couple of times till eventually the place became to small and they decided to move in 2001. At the moment they are rebuilding it, to make student rooms and some small apartments in the monastery. The church/chapel itself still didn't get a new purpose yet, but they are now investigating the possibilities to use it as a presentation and wedding venue.... Shortly after our visited this location became very popular and a few weeks they must have noticed something, as they properly closed all possible entries and added a shitload of camera's to protect the place, so unfortunately for us, its not possible anymore to do a revisit... Ok, enough said about this one, let's go on with the shots I managed to take here: 1# 2# 3# 4# 5# 6# 7# 8# 9# 10# 11# 12# 13# 14# 15# 16# 17# 18# Thanx for watching!! A couple more pic's can be found here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/urbexosaur ... 762807826/
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