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  1. The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though! Thanks for looking
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