Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'september'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 84 results

  1. probably a well known site. It was more then 4 years ago that i visited this one so a revisit was planned. On a sunny Sunday I went alone to this site;following the same path as 4 yeas ago,but wanted to see some other parts of this giant plant. Walked there for more than 4 hours and still not seen everything. Unfortunately the metal thieves were also active that day,removing metal ,so sometimes little parts and bolts fell down near the blast furnace. They even used a grinder. Security had a day of I think. (heard that 2 weeks before,some explores were caught here by security). It makes U think. Again a nice view from the top,and nice place to take a break.When I was up there ,I heard a lot of sirens and fire trucks coming towards the site,but (un)fortunately) there was a small fire in a home near the site. 1. IMG_2238-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_2252-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_2357-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2312-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_2282-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_2362-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_2395-Pano-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 IMG_2381-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 IMG_2421-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 IMG_2429 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 IMG_2432 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 IMG_2447-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 13 IMG_2442 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 14 IMG_2375 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 15 IMG_2305-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  2. Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  3. The former children´s sanatorium ("colonia") is located somewhere in the Italian mountains and was once built for the treatment of ill children. The building itself was a mere time capsule, full of numerous sick beds, school inventory as well as old medical bottles, ointments and tinctures - all of those had exceeded their expiry date by decades. Moreover, we found old documents - old vaccination confirmations of the late 1960s as well as old patient´s lists of the 1950s.
  4. Ida Darwin Hospital, Cambridge, September 2017/Jan 2018 Another year, another one of Landies big backlogs! I first did this site back in September with a non-explorer friend. It was pretty boring overall and the one building which looked any good, turned out to be inaccessible. I later heard the warped door round the back needed a bit of extra tug; but was open! Doh! I kept hold of the photos until I returned in January of this year with another non explorer and went for the more intact building! Sadly upon arrival; we found the nice part of the hospital to be completely trashed! Double Doh! Still, it was a day out and good to be in somewhere. The hospital is partly live, but seems to be closing at a fair rate of knots. Way back in the late 19th century; people with brain injuries and single mothers were referred to as "feeble minded" and local authorities were to provide public asylums to house those deemed to be "pauper lunatics". Fulbourn Asylum was opened in 1858 for the feeble minded people of Cambridge to be kept in as it was considered that those people should be segregated from the rest of society. By the 1960s, the need for provision of dedicated care and support of the mentally handicapped people in the area was noted. The below site was chosen by The East Anglia regional Hospital Board; next to the Fulbourn mental hospital. The then new hospital site catered for 250 residents and the aim was that the facilities would enable each resident to maximise their greatest potential. The hospital was named Ida Darwin and has been slowly closing down over the last couple of years. There was also a weird poo room where someone had turned a table on its side and had been going behind the table turned over. Perhaps someone living rough here. #1 #2 #3 #4 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 As Always, thanks guys! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693924924014
  5. Hey everyone! It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images. As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (: 1st day:Usine Barbele The entrance was quite easy. The place where the hole in the fence should be seemed to have been closed a few times already; but everytime a new hole was opened just a few steps further. Arriving at the heart of the plant, we quickly made our way up to the rows of coking furnaces. It was a rather dark day, clouds hanging heavily in the sky, and we stopped many times when some loose parts made loud crashing noises, moved by the wind. We did not feel comfortable here, it seemed like we were not welcome. After taking some portraits at the big fans, my girlfriend told me she was hearing engine sounds, and we decided to rush into a small cabin at the side of the road and hide. And really, she was right: A black Dacia made its way slowly around the plant, passing the shed where we were hiding. We heard it stopping somewhere, opening and closing it's doors again, and we were in complete agreement we should leave this place as fast as posible. Hiding behind everything we found, we fled along the side of the way, stopping and quietly peeking back every now and then. 2nd day: HFB We decided to be quick with this one when thinking back to the day before. We made our way to the blast furnace, took some photos and left again. We'll have a look at the rest of the site on our tour in march. ET Phone Home I found this one online just the day before, and after a short research, I had the coordinates. After having a stop at a small park to have a look at a sculpture we wanted to see, we quickly headed over the fields toward this one. We arrived at sunset, and after strolling through high grass and climbing the small fence, we stood in the middle of those antennas. I really liked the view, but I'm not at all pleased with the pictures I made. Maybe we'll repeat that one someday. 3rd day: Diesel Power Plant Not much to say. The door that was said to be open was closed again, so we moved on to the sea and did not any exploration that day. 4th day: Salle des Compresseurs We made our way in from the west. According to the parts we found in this wasteland, it used to be some kind of power station. There are also some basement structures where you can still find some electrical gear. The compressor house was a nice little place - nice machines looking like ducks, rust, peeling paint, plants. Beautiful. 5th day: Power Plant X The access to this one was said to be "a bit dirty", but i really enjoyed it. We took some shots in the boiler room and moved on to the pumping room in the next building. Sadly we didn't get to see the big hall with the gas motors as renovation work was going on - the space was lit up like a soccer field and plastic sheets were covering windows and machines. Let's hope it gets well preserved for the posterity so they can enjoy that view too! Terres Rouges This one was easy. We heard stories of police driving around and were careful, but luckily nothing happened. The place isn't as impressive as HFB or Usine Barbele and in a quite bad shape, but there were some nice perspectives. It was raining cats and dogs, so we didn't have much time to shoot the nice reflections. That's it for now. There aren't so much images as we also did a bit of sightseeing and I sorted out a bunch that I didn't like or weren't able to process to the point where I could post them with a good feeling Hope you still like them! If you like to see some (but that's not THAT much) more images, you can hit up my flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums We'll do another tour in March (Be, Lux, Fr, Es, It, Ch) and hopefully we'll come back with more pictures. Maybe I'll also add some of my older images. And of course, thanks a lot to the people that helped me with the locations and confirmed my researched coordinates - it's really nice to know how to get in and somebody has been there recently. I won't publish the names here so that you don't get flooded with requests, I hope that's ok. You rock! best wishes from Germany, Nico
  6. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  7. History The works was built in 1913 and extended in 1954, to purify water from the Strines, Dale Dike and Agden reservoirs. In 1930 it had the first telephone installed in Bradfield and served well with the Yorkshire Water Authority taking over in in 1974. The UK’s water industry became privatised in 1989, the premises closed in 1994 following the completion of the new Water Treatment Works in the Loxley Valley. More recently Proposals to convert the derelict water filter works into housing have being held up by bats. A protected species survey has to be carried out in the summer (2014) before a decision can be taken on an application to turn the derelict building into 15 studio apartments. The scheme, which also involves adding five cottages in the grounds and using old ponds as a trout farm, off Mill Lee Road, has been withdrawn for the time being. It is due to be resubmitted to the Peak Park planning authority once the survey results are known. Read more at: https://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/news/environment/bats-delay-village-housing-scheme-in-low-bradfield-1-6525905 Explore Bit off the beaten track this one... that said the works is set in a picturesque village situated just outside Sheffield. The building is built from yorkshire stone and sits well in its surroundings albeit in its derelict state. The building is sat on large plot of land although the works itself is a little on the small side considering its past as a water works. The works consist of three rooms, one of those smaller to the rear of the building. Theres also a raised office area off one of the larger rooms and toilets at the opposite side. The building is in good condition to say it's been left for over twenty years with easy entry to the building. Theres lots of graffiti some of which are shown in the post... this said not all are represented here. Its definitely worth a visit and offers entry level explorers a great insight into urban exploring + theres a great pub just across the road offering a great local ale. Some pics Little lad absolutely loving it from above It's been a while since we explored speaking with others it has a full time security guard and some high end CCTV have also been installed
  8. History Horbury had a chapel of ease to the Church of All Saints in Wakefield, from before the time of the Domesday Book. The chapel was replaced by a Norman chapel with a nave and tower that stood until it was replaced by the present church in 1790. St Peter and St Leonard’s Church, the parish church, was designed by John Carr, the Horbury born architect who built the Georgian neo-classical style between 1790 and 1794 at a cost to himself of £8,000. He is buried in a vault beneath the north aisle. The foundation of St John’s Church at Horbury Bridge was in a mission meeting in a room in what is now the hairdressers in 1864. Funds were raised and the church was built with stone from Horbury Quarry in 1884. The curate, Sabine Baring-Gould wrote the hymn “Onward Christian Soldiers” in 1865 for the Whitsun procession to Horbury Church. Another mission was set up at Horbury Junction in 1887 and St Mary’s Church was built in 1893. The Methodist Church on High Street was demolished. The Salvation Army corps has headquarters on Peel Street and the Tithe Barn Christian Centre is on Westfield Road. Tithe Barn Street in Horbury was so named after the old tithe barn, which was used to store produce of the tithe. A tithe means a tenth and one tenth of every Horbury parishioner's income from produce of the land had to be donated to the church. The right to receive tithes was granted to the English churches by King Ethelwulf in 855. These tithes were taxes, which each inhabitant was compelled to pay. Horbury was a Chapel of Ease to Wakefield Parish Church, and the Vicar of Horbury was a Curate in Charge. The tithes which were collected from Horbury residents belonged to the Vicar of Wakefield and not to the Vicar of St. Peter's, Horbury. Explore By chance we discovered this one on route to Wakefield... The exterior is in good condition and from what we understand the building became abandoned in 2011 after various businesses one including a day nursery had re-located. The interior is pretty heavily vandalised and lots of precious metals & items have been taken... this said theres no real structural damage and was able to negotiate round without any real danger. The main hall of the church still as some original features including coving found typically in a church, unfortunately no pews or alter remain although there was a cool seating area above the main hall. There was also an area round to the rear probably an extension at some point to deal with the volume of people... which had kept some of its original features... quite a nice easter egg this one! Pics Today the Christian Centre lays more vandalised than ever... still worth a wonder in my opinion
  9. History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  10. History The "Record" trademark was registered by the firm of C & J Hampton in the Trade Mark Journal in 1909. Charles and Joseph Hampton were Sheffield toolmakers and ironfounders located at Eagle Foundry in Livingston Road, Sheffield, who had originally started their business in 1898 manufacturing marlin spikes and specialist castings. By 1908 C & J Hampton became a limited company. It wasn't until January 1931 that the company introduced a range of woodworking planes, based on the popular patterns of the Stanley Tool brand, in their No. 10 catalogue. By this time the factory had relocated to Ouse Road in Attercliffe, Sheffield, and the new planes were being marketed as "an entirely new British product", benefitting from new Government import tariffs which penalised imports and assisted British manufacturers in combatting the influx of imported planes from America and other countries. Woodworking planes made by Stanley Tools in particular dominated the British market and so a "Buy British" campaign was instigated to help combat the depression in Britain at that time. In October 1934, C & J Hampton bought the manufacturing rights from John Rabone And Sons Ltd. for the entire range of iron planes and spoke shaves formally manufactured by Edward Preston And Sons Ltd. of Birmingham. By the early 1930's it had become apparent that Preston's had fallen into financial difficulties and they were subsequently bought out by Rabone's in October 1932. Prior to this, Preston's had been Rabone's main competitor in the manufacture of rules and levels so the takeover made perfect business sense however, after the acquisition, Rabone struggled with the concept of becoming planemakers as well, and saw it as a deviation from their traditional product lines. They did, however, spend almost two years re-organising the iron plane making department at Preston's Whittall Works before deciding that "certain products were found not to conform readily with the company's other interests.", so the rights were then sold to C & J Hampton. Record continued to add various planes and spokeshaves to its product line over the coming years, but were forced to drop some of their range because of wartime restrictions. It is unfortunate to note that many of these planes and spoke shaves never made it back into production once the restrictions had been lifted. During the 1950's and into the early 1960's, Catalogue No. 16 was frequently reissued in pocket form to keep customers informed of new tools, as well as the availability of certain pre-war planes, spokeshaves and other tools. Price lists were also updated wherever necessary. It wasn't until the firm had moved into new premises at Parkway Works in 1963 that Catalogue No. 17 was issued and that the product line had "stabilised" from its post-war restrictions. In 1972, C & J Hampton Ltd. merged with William Ridgway Ltd. to form Record-Ridgway Tools Ltd. By doing so, Record had taken on the manufacturing of wood boring tools, which was Ridgway's core business. AB Bahco, a Swedish chisel & woodworking tool company, bought Record-Ridgway Tools in March 1981, and renamed it Record Holdings in 1985, before renaming it again three years later to Record Marples (Woodworking Tools) Ltd. Around the same time the names of both "Record" and "Marples" appeared on the body castings of some planes -- predominantly the bench and block planes -- around the front knob. It was obviously a period of great upheaval for the firm as the company was renamed a further three times in the 1990's -- Record Tools Ltd. in 1991, Record Holdings plc in 1993 and then Record Tools Ltd. (a division of American Tool Companies Inc) in 1998. However, the company struggled financially and went into administration in 1998. It was then acquired by US-based Irwin Tools in 1998 but was closed down soon after as the American owners moved production to China. Explore Firstly we scaled the building to accomplish if any security were present & possible entry points... No probs with either so decided to take a look. The building is in poor condition and requires a little climbing and clambering through trees to reach. Theres asbestos present on site so was prepared with masks, the building is a fair size and took a little over an hour to explore. Lots of Sheffield graffiti art which is of a high standard and plenty of original features exist (unbelievably).. The building as come under attack from a lot of vandalism including fire damage, deliberate destruction and pigeons (lots of these present in the building), Theres also high levels of natural damage caused to the building via the weather (some areas the roofs not intact). Theres access to the upper floors via a central staircase (also leads to the roof) and a staircase at the west side of the building... lots of rooms leading off the staircases some safer than others. We were joined by SteelCityUrbex during the explore so shout outs to them... Great explore with lots of graffiti and nostalgia to keep you busy on the explore highly recommended (just watch out for the pigeons). PICS And to end off... a roof shot! Nothing much has changed in it current day form, just some more graffiti.
  11. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  12. An abandoned villa, named SS after the town it resides in. Not much to say really, a waste of a perfectly good house! Not my usual kind of explore if I'm honest but it made a change and kept @Miss.Anthropehappy! Same room but with the balcony doors opened to allow the sunlight in Thanks for looking
  13. So this was more of a cheeky little explore than anything planned in advance. A few of us were in the South of France for the Urban Explorer Wedding of the Year, an event that was most definitely epic and involved many many drunken selfies of at least half a dozen drunken explorers (including the Bride and Groom) but hey that's another story and not one for here The day after we left the Bride and Groom to do Honeymoony type things and took ourselves off on a trip to the local cokeworks/coal miney type place. It isn't epic or awesome but it was a pretty damn fine mooch to end the trip with. It is a derpy derp and appears to be a popular place to burn out cars but worth a trip anyway History is limited and in French so here is my best shot at something that vaguely resembles information but however doesn't mean a great deal to me and is probably worth skipping lol!.... The Sainte Marie open pit was a coal mine of the Mining Unit of Tam, H.B.C.M. (Houilleres du Bassin Centre Midi), in the south-western part of France, near Albi. In this area, a large amount of coal has been exploited by Underground mining. This pit was designed in order to exploit the coal remaining around the shaft (Saint Marie shaft) of an old Underground mine situated in the basin of Carmaux.The diameter at the top of the pit was 1200 metres and its final depth was expected to be 300 metres. The first 100 metres were composed of tertiary deposits (clay and sand) which covered the carboniferous formation. The average slope angle of the Tertiary is 37° (without benches) and in the Coal Measures, it was foreseen from 37° to 50° (with benches of 6 metres high) depending on the slope situaüon. At present üme, the depth of the mine is about 160 metres. Nine coal seams have been mined by Underground working between 1900 and 1984. Different methods have been used depending on the thickness, the dip of the layer and the dimension of the panel. In fact, panels were backfilled, caved or undermined long-wall. The basin of Carmaux is a large synclinal split by a dense network of faults which directions are approximately N 140 E. The dips and the dip directions which was left around the shaft, but, close to the slopes, begin the old exploited long walls. These long walls are at different topographic levels due to the particular structure and have been exploited in panels lined by the faults odented approximately N140. The first design of the open pit was done by a Standard geotechnical survey; this one has taken into account the geomechanical, hydrogeological, structural Parameters äs well äs the "decohesion", induced by the revival of subsidence due to old Underground mining. However, some mining slopes can locally present risks of slipping induced by old Underground mining. Anyway here are a few pics Thanks for looking
  14. Moreton in the Marsh District Hospital - September 2017 Visited a few weeks ago with Mookster and two other non-members for one of their bithdays. It was a very relaxed explore as you'd expect; pretty trashed and stripped of most things, but still retained some photographic merit. We were caught on the way out by a friendly and incredibly confused security guard who didn't really have an awful lot to say and just smiled a lot! Moreton-in-Marsh Cottage Hospital was a small Victorian hospital built in the Cotswolds. It's closure in 2012 came about after a new much larger facility opened just outside the village. Moreton Cottage Hospital was built in 1873 by private subscription. Lord Redesdale gave the land at the north end of the town in Back Ends. The first small stone building had seven beds, but this was extended in 1879 following a £3,000 request by Dr. William Sands Cox, the founder of Queen's College, Birmingham. In 1886 The Joseph Phipps Charity donated a further £1,000 stock to the hospital in and an operating theatre was built in 1900. By 1919 the hospital was extended further, when £2,000 was given to the hospital, and again in 1935. Moreton in the Marsh Cottage Hospital; which had been managed by trustees, eventually came under the authority of the Banbury and District Hospital Management Committee after 1946. There are a several buildings within the site, the main hospital and a much more modernised outpatients clinic. After the hospitals closure, bits of the hospital have been used by a prop hire company as storage but now the whole site remains disused. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686204703971
  15. I don´t have much information about the small brewery which is located in the south of Germany. The current owner is a guy from England, who disappeared some years ago. Since then, the building has been left to decay. The story hit some headlines in the local newspapers. Small, but I loved it anyway!
  16. Sadly now demolished � Ysgol y bont was a special education centre which was replaced by a 10million pound education cente further up the road which contains sensory rooms, a hydrotherapy pool and corridors witha built in gradient so that stairs are unecessary. Ysgol y bont was replaced in 2014. � � � � � � �
  17. Wanted to see this place for a awhile now and was over the moon to finally get into this awesome site.Spent a good few hours wandering the hospital and got to see some excellent features including the admin building and it's lovely staircase. Got to spend another couple of hours in the morning on a solo mooch which I will put up as a separate report. Visited with four local non members. History Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex, United Kingdom was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 to the design of architect Frank Whitmore. It opened in May 1913. The 300-acre (120 ha) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 1/2 3/4 5 6/7 8 9 10 11 12/13 14/15 16/17 18 19/20 21 22 23 Thanks For Looking
  18. Visited both these place after travelling down to London the night before the kent meetup I had always wanted to see London from the rooftops with my own eyes and it did not disappoint! much better than the rubbish views I had seen in Leeds and Sheffield! Thanks to The Raw and Extreme Ironing for showing us these 2 and thanks again to The Raw for letting us crash at his house! Cheers for looking
  19. After seeing Urbexbandoned's recent report on this place and knowing of the other two attractions on the same site I would have been a fool not to have gone for a look while I was in the area. Nice little mooch is one with large parts still quite clean and decay starting in others. Pretty much stripped of any stuff but an interesting building with a workhouse history. Thanks for the heads up on this one guys and a massive thanks to Tagger for the help Melton Mowbray Poor Law Union officially came into existence on 26th March 1836. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, 56 in number, representing its 54 constituent parishes. A Union workhouse was built in 1836 at the east side of Thorpe Road in Melton Mowbray. It was designed by Charles Dyer and adopted an elongated H-plan layout, rather than one of radial layouts more popular at the time. An infirmary designed by RW Johnson was erected at the east of the workhouse in 1869-70. At the centre were a surgery. kitchen, and nurse's quarters. Male and female patients had separate entrance to each side. A vagrants' block was located at the south of the workhouse. It contained work cells for stone-breaking at the southern side. The cells walls contained outlet grids through which were placed the small pieces of broken stone. The former workhouse later became St Mary's Hospital which seems to have shut in 2010. 1 2 3 4 5 6/7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15/16 17/18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Thanks For Looking
  20. THE HISTORY Croda was originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The factory opened in 1855 and the company went from having 84 staff in 1840 to a remarkable 2300. Borrowed from Lavino hope you dont mind m8ty. The explore Visited here with Acid- Reflux. Really liked the look of this wanted to climb those towers lol. Anyway was one hell of a fun explore. Has we got there acid suddenly stopped and said someone is riding a bike round the outside of building looking in like secca etc. Very clever has a lot quieter than a quad. Anyways once he had done one in we went but that wasn't the end of close calls and surprises lol. After a nice walk round we split up temporally taking some shots. When from out of no where this dude walked right past a door where i was stood big bald dude looked like someone you wouldn't wanna meet lol. He didn't see me so i slowly made my way back to acid told him and waited a little. Anyway decided to make our way to another building the clock tower was our next port of call. Just has we went round the corner this lad came the other way How the fook he didn't see us i have no idea. Anyway me and acid then hid like a couple of prats in a fairly cramp shower after stepping across some minions heads that made more fooking noise than pigeons lol. After 15 mins or so acid then decided to say WTF are we doing lol. And out we went straight into clock tower building. Now this was pretty cool. While we where in there one floor above us there was a shit ton of noise. Talking banging etc. When we got to stairs we stood for a bit then decided fook it up we went. Now no ghost shit but FFS it was empty no fooker there 15 mins of noise and now empty no way down past us NOTHING. So if that was you doing one hell of a magic trick fair play. We couldn't get to the clock but from what Ive heard its modern now so not really much to see. Anyway did the rest towers etc. And then right near the end i heard acid say hello and in walked this big bald dude Shit busted. So you would think but oh no all this time playing hide and seek and he was there doing something metal who knows cause he says " Are you meant to be in here " In which Acid replies in his charming manner " No Are You" The guy then says " No " Acid then says " Good " LMFAO. All this fooking time hide and fooking seek and they where not even secca DUH. Anyways was a bloody fun explore now on with thee pics. PICS WooHoo Kitchens lol love me a kitchen. Snakes and ladders or that snake game from nokia days lol Very very funny considering the company lol. Photo opp lol My made phot opp lol I am a Dalek From the towers Waiting on tour bus home lol Thanks for looking. Sorry on pic heavy but with such a larger place and several buildings hard to cut down pics. Hope you like it.
  21. Scrappy and I visited this place with some new friends - Mars Lander, Shush, Lowri to name but a few! Big thanks to them for inviting us to join them on what was a very fun explore This place was MASSIVE, you could get lost in it. We had some close calls with people on the grounds, visitors to this site are not welcome and that's putting it mildly! Luck was on our side that day and we got to see the majority of the site before a leisurely walk back to the car. In my opinion, this place is worth seeing for the rooftop views alone, they were spectacular A little bit of history on the place: The Grade 2 listed house is set in walled Venetian gardens of around 18 acres. the mansion, constructed in Wales in the 1870s. The stables are Grade 1 listed. There are 122 rooms with 52 main bedrooms and quarters for 60 live-in servants. The prodigious estate passed through various generations and still bares its coat of arms on the huge wrought iron gates. During World War II it was used as a military hospital and it later became private Clarendon Girls' School. In 1975 the hall was extensively damaged in a fire, forcing the school to close. It was then restored and used as a conference centre. It was sold at auction in 2001 but a proposed redevelopment failed to materialise. The steps up to the stables Exterior shot of the mansion Rooftop shot. You may spy a few familiar faces up there Thanks for looking
  22. Come and spend the tail end of the summer exploring, relaxing and having a good time in Kent. OK it is the arse end of England, but we've never had a proper big meet down here . . . . until now! I've been promising people for a long time that I would organise a meet in Kent, so here it is. Date is set as I can't really do many other weekends so apologies to those who can't make it. This will be an exploring meet staying in a nice location in the Kent countryside, we're not going to be stuck in a pub. Bring your own beer, food and something to sleep in. The venue will be announced via PM nearer the time as I have two in mind, both are in areas where there are other things to explore nearby so you can make a day of it and meet up in the evening. You won't necessarily need a tent as both venues have sheltered areas you can sleep in and places you can hang hammocks (you may need pitons thou) One venue has a lake next to it you can kayak in, both have areas we can rig a short pitch for rope techniques. So if you're interested say below and keep the 5th 6th September free! :-) There's no limit on numbers here and members old and new are equally welcome so if you've never attended a meet before, now's your chance to come and meet us all. This is a cross-forum explorers meet so they'll be members from other UE forums and Facebook. There's no limits to numbers really, but keep it to people you trust only. Maniac :-)
  23. The former London headquarters of Midland Bank, a Grade I-listed property designed by Edwin Lutyens and John Alfred Gotch and built in 1925, is soon to be turned into a boutique hotel. The imposing building, in the heart of the Square Mile, was vacated six years ago by HSBC, which bought Midland in 1992. It has since operated as a branch of NatWest and as a filming location for Channel 4's game show The Bank Job. It's vaults also appeared in the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger. The sequence in which it appeared sees the Bond villain Oddjob meet his demise. The main hall was at one time the largest bank hall in Europe. The new hotel will be part of the Soho House group, which owns a string of private members' clubs (some with accommodation), restaurants and stand-alone boutique hotels. The large building will feature 255 rooms, as well as restaurants, bars, spa and gym facilities and a swimming pool. Work is now well under way so I was really lucky to see this when I did, I saw an opportunity and I seized it. I hope you enjoy the pics, they were all taken handheld in the space of about 5 minutes. Thanks for looking
  24. This is one of those locations where you walk around in sheer amazement at the fact somewhere so grand has been abandoned. I don't know any more history other than it was once a luxurious health spa. The entrance hall is the main attraction with ornate carved ceilings that wouldn't look out of place in a palace. That's not to say the rest of the place isn't stunning as well however, and I was surprised at the sheer size of the building. Someone (mentioning no names Rolf) accidentally overlooked our access point which led to me trying an alternative route and in turn piercing my foot on a spike akin to Alan Partridge, take a look at this video if you don't know what I'm talking about With a few texts sent to the UK for assistance we were back on track though (thanks for that you know who you are) and made the most of what daylight we had left. This was a really memorable explore partly due to a brass band playing a bizarre soundtrack throughout the trip. They were part of a beer festival outside and I will never forget them playing the Rocky theme tune as we entered the building! I want them to come on future explores just for that! SO much WIN!! My pics aren't the best but they'll do, what an awesome place! That ceiling, looks like a painting but it's actually wallpaper...notice part of it peeling away.... Best explore band in the world! Upon leaving after the others I was a bit concerned to see flashing blue lights everywhere, thankfully there had been a mass brawl in the street so we weren't even on their radar Thanks for looking
  25. It was a bit of a race against time getting to this location. Towards the end of the day, a successful day - this being the 4th location. We wanted to make sure that we had enough time to do the place properly, not rushed. Sometimes when the light fades, one has no choice but to rush though. as it happened, we got there around mid afternoon, so rushing was not going to be necessary. That was just as well, as I had no idea what to expect at this location, however the size of the place was a massive surprise. What was even more of a surprise was the different feel of the various rooms. It was pretty dark inside for the most part, but the decay and nature reclaiming was brilliant - if that is the right way to describe it... In one of the main rooms was a fireplace - which had a very interesting feature - a cupboard above the fire, but below the mantelpiece. Odd, as whatever was stored there would surely get pretty warm Although it was still pretty sunny outside, the shutters made it a bit of a nightmare to get any decent shots - although in some ways it also added to the atmosphere of the place In the basement was the remnants of brewing - quite whether this was just for the consumption of the house - probably - I don't know. Would be nice to have that sort of cellar though. Wine on tap - quite literally. Yep, I could do with that for sure The kitchen was a mess, they could have tidied up really On the way back to the car, I noticed this wheel. Not sure what the purpose was though, outside the house and yet with some sort of connection to the floor below. Whether it was a case of turning the wheel from the ground level or below is anyone's guess. There was not much movement in it now though... Thanks for looking in
×