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  1. Since 1961, a one-room grocery store has been operating in the countryside. In the other part of the building lived the shop owners. Later, the store belonged to other people, until 1992, when it left the Russian government, it was closed because it no longer met the requirements of the store. People were still living in the building, when they died, he was abandoned My instagram- laiko_pamirsti
  2. Explored...laughed...spiked...and battered with my besty Perjury Saint.. beep beeep beep!! its 4am time to splore!! a text comes through "" OI T**T get up! Time to coffin Dodge!" x ......... We have both looked at this one for a year or more and ummed and arrged at it...a 50 ft wall surrounds it...rotating razor wire on every access point..spikes topping all the walls...major drops..plus on the doorstop of an extremly busy area..but neither of us were going to settle until be gave her a really good bash.. after negotiating the wall we slowly tiptoed across a very snowy slippery ledge with a " dont look down " drop and hay prestow...its coffin time! you either look at it and do it... or just walk away,,,today the was no walking away.. Inside needless to say it was incredible completly fasinating...it was pitch black when we got in and to be confronted with two coffins was rather spooky to say the least... the history is just amazing with coffins being made here for Lady Diana and sir winston Churchill.... This explore was just brilliant with fab company as always..cheers Tink! On with the Pics... And after all that sploring my keeper watches over me while i sleep.......
  3. Have just become aware of some bloody horrible news via Glenn Bruce on FaceBook and linked to his thread on 28 regarding the Iconic Dick Willows cider shop closing. Will the Wiltshire weekends in the mine party's ever be the same Announcment After careful consideration, we have taken the decision to leave the premises on Box Road from the end of March. It seems an appropriate moment to restructure and focus on our core business - making cider! We would like to thank all our wonderful customers who have supported us through the past four years. The barn will still be open to the public and some of the existing businesses will continue to operate from the building, including Kellyann Bespoke Picture Framing, Blooms Florist and the Walk of Curiosity (antiques and collectables, bygones and curios). For the time being you will be able to find Dick Willows at the weekly Bath Farmers Market, Green Park Station, Saturdays from 9.30am. You can continue to keep in touch with us via Facebook...or if you drop us a quick email to [email protected] we can add you to our mailing list and keep you up to date with all our cider news. All other contact information at http://www.dickwillows.com. You can rest assured, we will continue to make great cider, we hope to be in the running again this year for the Bristol Good Food Awards best cider, we will be at the Bath Farmer's Market every Saturday, the Dick Willows Cider Bar will be popping up at private and community events throughout the year, and we may well put on some events in the future. So we're not going away! x Shit am gutted
  4. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  5. After an early start with work I was looking for somewhere to go for a nap so I headed to the local supermarket to hide in the carpark and get 40 winks. The first thing I noticed as I pulled into tesco was a fence with "DANGEROUS BUILDING DO NOT ENTER" well this was like a red rag to a bull so I was straight in. Above ground was just a shell but around the side I had spotted a bricked up arch a hole big enough to scramble in, inside was a nice selection of tunnels and arches
  6. I have decided to place this report into others as it it a mix mash of a days trekking around East anglia. Separated I think they are a bit crap, but altogether it seems ok Went on one of those random drives that you do.. Just out and about looking for what cool stuff you can find. We had 2 things we wanted to see, one we could get in, but we would have got busted very quickly and then it would have been sealed up and nobody would be getting in for a while, so we gave it a miss, the 2nd we got seen by security while walking about. So it was now a case of lets just drive and see what we find.. It was mostly old houses that we found, and also some random fibre glass place, that looked smart from the outside, but megar trashed inside and not even worth getting the camera out. I came across this old house that was obviously part of a smallholding in the area, it was located just outside Ramsey Forty Foot, and we did notice that there was a good few of them along the road. 1 2 3 4 5 6 So next stop was RAF Upwood. One of those places that get done to death, and as I was in the area and had never been I thought I would go and have a little look around. This was one of those sites that just look the same as most others and after 30 mins of walking around you have shot most things, well until you come across the tanks. History Royal Air Force Upwood or more simply RAF Upwood is a former Royal Air Force station adjacent to the village of Upwood, Cambridgeshire, England in the United Kingdom. In the early 1930s, Britain realised its air defence capabilities were in urgent need of expansion. The major expansion of the Royal Air Force announced in 1934 resulted in many new airfields opening over the remainder of the decade. One of these was RAF Upwood. The old First World War airfield site was selected to be reactivated and expanded. The new station was designed to accommodate two medium bomber squadrons with room for a third. By 1936, construction had begun in earnest with two of five C-type hangars started. On 27 February 1937 the first flying unit arrived at Upwood in the form of No. 52 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Hinds. This unit was joined on 1 March 1937 by No. 63 Squadron and its Hawker Audaxes. During their time at Upwood, No 52 and 63 Squadrons became training units and took on both Fairey Battle and Avro Anson aircraft. In August and September 1939, the two squadrons were reassigned opening the field up to its new tenant, No. 90 Squadron flying Bristol Blenheims. With the end of the Second World War came a change in missions for the two squadrons at Upwood. No 156 Squadron was tasked with bringing food to Holland in support of Operation Manna then help repatriate former Prisoners of War as part of Operation Exodus. On 27 June 1945 the squadron was moved from Upwood. In place of the departing No 156 Squadron came No 105 Squadron, also flying Mosquitos. Both 105 and 139 Squadrons continued flying from RAF Upwood until February 1946. On 1 February 1946 No 139 Squadron moved to RAF Hemswell. On 4 February 1946 No. 105 Squadron was disbanded. Flying operations didn't cease for long. On 15 February 1946 Upwood became home to No. 102 Squadron flying Consolidated B-24 Liberator bombers. They spent the next several months bring British troops home from India. On 1 March 1946 the squadron was redesignated No 53. Squadron. The squadron was disbanded on 25 June 1946 soon after its last ferry flight. Two new squadrons of Lancasters called Upwood home starting on 29 July 1946 with arrival of No. 7 Squadron and No. 49 Squadron. On 4 November 1946 No. 148 Squadron and No. 214 Squadron were both reformed at Upwood. These new additions were part of a transition of Upwood from a training to attack mission. Both of the new squadrons also flew Lancasters. The four squadrons continued to fly their Lancasters until 1949 when they were transitioned to Avro Lincolns. Lincolns from 148 Squadron deployed to RAF Shallufa in January 1952 to reinforce British units in the Suez Canal Zone. This was in response to riots in Cairo and a generally unstable political situation in Egypt. During 1954 each of the four squadrons deployed to either RAF Tengah in Singapore in support of anti-communist operations in Malaysia or to Kenya in support of operations against the Mau Mau. Additionally, Lincolns from No 214 Squadron and No 7 Squadron took part in a secret mission in connection with nuclear trials conducted near Woomera, Australia. During this time a film production company produced a war time film play called Appointment in London. The company used three Lancasters in making the film but the background shots are of the four Squadrons of Lincolns and the film uses much of the airfield and buildings in its production showing a good view of Upwood at that time On 31 December 1954 Upwood lost one of its four flying units when No. 214 Squadron disbanded. This unit was replaced on 22 May 1955 when No. 18 Squadron moved to Upwood from RAF Scampton. This squadron brought something completely new to the base in the form of their English Electric Canberra jet bombers. This was followed by more Canberras when No. 61 Squadron moved in from RAF Wittering on 3 July 1955. Two more Lincoln squadrons disbanded on 1 August, 49 and 148. This was followed by the disbanding of the last Lincoln squadron, No. 7, on 1 January 1956. These were replaced throughout 1956 by more Canberra units; No. 50 Squadron on 9 January, No. 35 Squadron on 16 July and No. 40 Squadron on 1 November. However, this last squadron was disbanded on 15 December 1956. Eight Canberras B2 each from Nos. 7, 18,35,50 and 61 Squadron flew to Cyprus on 19 October in support of Operation Alacrity. Over four days in early November, these aircraft took part in raids on various targets in Egypt. This was the first combat operations by Upwood aircraft since the Second World War. The 32 planes returned to Upwood just in time for Christmas, arriving home on 24 December 1956. The next two years saw a series of unit disbandments and arrivals culminating in a slow winding down of flying operations at Upwood. On 1 February 1957, No. 18 Squadron was disbanded. On 31 March 1958 No. 61 Squadron disbanded. No. 542 Squadron arrived on 17 July along with No. 76 Squadron. No 542 Squadron was renamed to No. 21 Squadron on 1 October. The year 1959 saw the disbanding of No. 21 Squadron (15 January) and No. 50 Squadron (1 October). On 31 December 1960 No. 76 Squadron disbanded. The final flying unit No. 35 Squadron was disbanded on 11 September 1961. With the disbanding of No. 35 Squadron Upwood was transferred to RAF Strike Command who quickly set about transforming the airfield into a hub of various support activities. Over the next several months the station became home to No 4 Ground Radio Servicing Section, Radio Technical Publications Squadron, the Aeromedical Training Centre, the Joint School of Photographic Interpretation and three squadrons of HQ No 33 Field Wing, RAF Regiment. The different units had barely settled in when change came again. In early 1963 the RAF Regiment units departed. In 1964 the other units left as well, leaving Upwood with only a token care-taker staff. In March 1964, 22 Group of Technical Training Command arrived and set up their School of Management and Work Study. July saw the arrival of the School of Education and the RAF Central Library, followed in September by the School of Administration. Upwood was again becoming focused on training. Later training units included the Equipment Officers Training Centre and the Air Cadet Training Centre. These various training activities lasted, in one form or another, until the late 1970s. By 1981, the station was again almost dormant. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Then it was time to start making the drive home, but we decided to stop of at a old green grocers on the Norfolk suffolk borders to have a look. It was trashed, Signs of a fire, dodgy roofs and full of junk, so after salvaging a few images we decided to call it a day and head home. 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  7. The Sweat Shop...A Stitch In Time This abandoned factory was used to make religious garments for export to Europe. Established in the 1940s this well known company went into liquidation due to lack of demand for religious garments there main uk seller was http://www.clergycollar.co.uk/ who now source the products from Botswana .....sign of the times . Attached to the factory is a small chapel so buyers could actually try out the garments before purchase and im led to believe they did offer a made to measure service as some clergy tend to be on the portly size on with the photos 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Thanks for reading my waffle and looking at my photographs
  8. I have seen this building so many times when passing through Leicester but it wasnt until yesterday and several other fails that we gave it a go. A total fail on my behalf for not getting any externals-my bad. It seems it was once a manufacturer of textile items for C&A, Boots and other larger retailers, Im assuming closing due to overseas factories taking the contracts with cheaper labour. A total mess but still has some character inside, along with massive spiders. Visited with Skankypants, Shush, Borintomisbehave and Jammin'. Thanks
  9. I have a good explore mate (who's name I won't mention) who once gave me some stick for exploring derelict houses, so with this post I can actually stick two fingers up at him, because if I hadn't bothered to go up and push the door of this normal looking derelict 3 story house then I never would have found the gold mine that lay behind the boarded up windows. I can only think it was a TV repair shop at one time, the newest stuff I could find inside dated from about the mid to late 80's. Sorry it's a bit pic heavy and please please don't PM me asking where it is, because after poor Mooksters Hoarders House fiasco I will not be spilling the beans
  10. A day out smootchin and what's this place i pass many times and never seen until today !!!!!, a repair shop for steam trains....... nice place but I can not give any history on this place or about trains (not my subject sorry), never the less they were very helpful so on with the pics... hope you liked, ill try and go again some time and get some worthy history about each chooo chooooooo all i know is some are from poland (rescued) and one in re build stage from america also some were used in ww2.....
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