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  1. After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  2. One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  3. Explored with Lost Explorer, The Wombat and a non-member History The Falcon Works Hanley, was owned by J. H. Weatherby & Sons Ltd who established a works on site in 1891. The works originally specialized in earthenware but later went on to produce fine porcelain. The former extant hovel kiln may date from the 1890s. The inner kiln has probably been renewed a few times since, and is likely to be dated mid 20th Century. Originally the works had 5 kilns, but 3 were relocated to the southern end of the site in 1906, when the firm expanded. Included within this expansion, the front of the site was added providing a new façade to the main street. Before the construction of Potteries Way, the street(now called Old Town Road) was the main road north out of Hanely and was lined with many small potteries. The firm continued to grow slowly between and after the wars, first branching into hotelwares, then later collectables. By the 1970s the firm’s expansion was hindered by planning control and by 2000 the works finally closed. At its height the works employed 200, by 2000 it employed 10. Explore This was the second explore of the day, and turned out to be our final success as well. Really enjoyed this, nice to see somewhere which hasn't been destroyed by kids, offering nature the oppotunity to take hold. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) Cheer for Looking
  4. The Visit Having tried this one a few months back with Funlester and being completely baffled by how to get in the place I returned with a non member armed with a little more intel and determination paid off this time This is one of those explores that you really can feel the history of the place I thought.. can just imagine what a hive of activity it must have been in its day. The History George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world's leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley's survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed.
  5. Random quick visit to this place, didn't get in much of it but a nice little visit. History - Corah & Sons was a former hosiery and textiles business, founded by Nathaniel Corah in 1824. St Margaret's works opened in 1865 - 66 and closed in the 1990s. Today parts of the factory are still used by hosiery and textile companys, but much of the factory is unused. The chimney has gone and there was a fire in April 2012, it is not a listed building. The sculpture of St Margaret which formerly stood above the main entrance, was removed too St Margaret's chapel in 1995.
  6. History “Basically, we’ve decided to close down before someone else forced us to – while we are solvent rather than insolvent. It’s really upsetting. One of the main reasons is for the employees who work here. We have had two or three generations of people working here and one of the things I’ve found warming is their reaction to this. They have been very sympathetic and understanding. Everyone who works here has been very happy here†(Christopher Weatherby, 2000). J. H. Weatherby & Sons was founded in 1891, in Tunstall. Mr. Weatherby later established the Falcon Works, a larger pottery workshop, in 1892, when they moved the company to Hanley. The site at Hanley was comprised of extensive workshops built around a large central yard. The entire structure was built using brick and a plain tiled roof. Inside the courtyard there was, and still is, a bottle kiln with a circular hovel over a downdraught oven. A number of muffle kilns were also located at this site, and at one time they were rumoured to have been the only ones of their kind left in the city of Stoke. The company specialised in ornamental goods (tableware and giftware) to everyday domestic ware (basins and ewers), and as they expanded their main lines turned to hotel and crested ware. Unfortunately, entering into the hotel market turned out to be J.H. Weatherby & Sons downfall. After over 109 years of trading, the Falcon Works subsequently became one of the last remaining family-owned pottery firms to close in 2000. The chairman, Christopher Weatherby, the great grandson of the company’s founder (John Henry Weatherby) attributed its closure to ‘cut-throat’ competition against larger commercial businesses, especially those overseas. They simply could not keep up with the mass demand for pottery and the rate of production of big pottery factories. At its height, the company employed over 200 full time staff, however, months before closure this number had fallen to a mere 10 employees. After the closure of the pottery works, Jonathan Weatherby, working alongside a small staff from the original works, took over producing for JONROTH. For a time they operated under the name of Jonathan Weatherby At Falcon Pottery. Our Version of Events After our little expedition through Butterley Tunnel, and a quick sleep in a random football field somewhere, we left the countryside and made for Stoke on Trent. We have no real idea why we went that way, we just followed the road and went where it took us. Once we got there, we decided to take a quick pit-stop, to give the drivers a break, and it just so happened the Falcon Works were nearby. Like many others have said in various different reports, this place looks like it was once spectacular, with plenty of leftovers to see. Now, however, the place is best described as ‘fucked’. A lot of the leftover pottery and machinery has been smashed, the bottle kiln has collapsed in on itself and most of the roof has disintegrated. There is still a bit to see though, and we found a few nooks and crannies with interesting decaying remains of the Falcon Works pottery past. Despite the fact that there is virtually no roof and some of the walls have crumbled away, most of the floors are surprisingly intact, so navigating our way around the building wasn’t too difficult. After an hour or so inside we decided to wrap things up because we were burning daylight. On that note, we left Stoke and continued on our epic journey to nowhere in particular. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, Rizla Rider and Husky. 1: J. H. Weatherby & Sons External Shot 2: The General Condition of the Building 3: Upstairs in an Old Workshop 4: Another Workshop 5: A Pottery Rack 6: Plaster Storage 7: A Little Sample of the Pottery 8: Pottery Storage Room 9: The Large Machine/Oven Room 10: The Inner Courtyard 11: Inside the Bottle Kiln 12: The Rest of the Courtyard 13: Down in the Basement: Sacks of Bisilicate 14: Upstairs in the Pottery Rooms 15: Plates and Dishes 16: Ruined Storage Room 17: More Pottery 18: Chaos 19: Empty and Quiet 20: Metal Basin 21: Pot Ovens 22: Machines Upstairs 23: Allen West & Co. 24: Old Workshop 25: The Usual Shoe You Find in These Places 26: Broken Lift 27: The Roofless Workshop 28: A Summery of J. H. Weatherby & Sons 29: The 'Hand Warmer' on the Oven
  7. History: founded in 1836 and specializing in manufacture files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry, they grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley & Sons survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Explore: This site was 2nd on the agenda for my day in Sheffield with Miz Firestorm, Duggie & Alex. Short walk from the courts and we were there, somewhat interesting entry (although i can't go into details ) and we were in! Had a nice, undisturbed wonder round here - stunning place I must add, really enjoyed it here. I'll upload the rest of the pictures from the day once I get round to editing, but until then, have these.. As always, thanks for looking!
  8. This is my George Barnsley visit, there are many like it, but this one is mine My first visit, the gate's always been shut before, I'm sure I'll be back. You all know the history, on with the pics... Wouldn't be a GB report without that pic
  9. Hello again So over the bank holidays we took a trip to see an old friend (George Barnsley) havnt been for a while and was in the area so thought why the heck not George Barnsley & Sons Ltd specialised in tools for shoe makers and leather workers. The building closed around 2004. Enjoy... Thanks for looking
  10. George Barnsley and sons, a key toolmakers in Sheffield's history, well at least for us lot.. Heres a small set for you i took a few months back now enjoy:p THanks ........
  11. A nice little relaxed explore. Not that amazing but a few good things left to photograph. History: George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Thanks For Looking!
  12. Bit of History. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works Cornesh street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He Died Aged 83. Splored with Zero81 & met up with Mexico75,Esposa,S8,The Riddlers & Tiddlers there..... Thanks...
  13. Northern Trip Part 2 – George Barnsley and Sons Cornish Works (Sheffield) So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. Day two and onto Sheffield for two explores, The Tool Maker: George Barnsley and Sons and of course the Crown Courts. I really liked this place, it had that real “Northern Industrial Decline†about it, it’s a true time-warp to Industrial Britain. It’s a shame places like this don’t really exist anymore. It’s the kind of place where you could go in and ask for a handful of bolts and they would give them to you for free. Its not in a great state by the look of it so I’m glad I captured it when I did. In 1823; George Barnsley was apprenticed into the file-makers trade by his mother, Anne. Anne was a widow. George was signed in to the apprenticeship – to a Thomas Wing of Sheffield – for seven years and two hundred and seventy one days. Later; George went in to partnership with his brother and they established themselves as one of the worlds leading manufacturers of shoe manufacturing tools and leather trades. Throughout the 19th century, the company grew and the Barnsley family were highly regarded in the thriving city of Sheffield. Eventually the vintage factory and production methods forced production to cease and give in to the increasingly competitive import market and the growing costs of production, finally closing in 2003. Northern Trip Part 3 – Sheffield Crown Courts Northern Trip Part 1 – The Burnley Empire More At: George Barnsley and Sons - a set on Flickr
  14. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883.: George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works Cornesh street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He Died Aged 83
  15. John Summers & Sons Ltd was a major United Kingdom iron and steel producer, latterly based at Shotton, Flintshire. The company was absorbed into British Steel in 1967; British Steel became Corus in 1999 and this company was taken over by Tata Steel in 2007. The founder, John Summers, was born in Bolton, Lancashire in 1822. While working as a clogger, he visited the Great Exhibition in 1851, where he bought a nail making machine, and commenced making nails with which to fasten the iron strips on to the soles of clogs. In 1852, Summers moved into Sandy Bank Iron Forge at Stalybridge, where he successfully concentrated on the production of clog irons and nails. He then purchased land near the forge, and built a new ironworks, known as the Globe Works. John Summers died on 10 April 1876, at the age of 54. Three of his sons, James, John and Alfred, carried on the business, and they were joined by another brother, Henry Hall Summers in 1869. Space for expansion at the Globe Works having been exhausted, the firm opened the Hawarden Bridge Steelworks at Shotton in 1896. In 1898 the firm became a Private Limited Company and in 1908, on completion of new offices, the headquarters were transferred to Shotton. By 1909 the company was the largest manufacturer of galvanized steel in the country, and probably the largest manufacturer of steel nail strips and sheets. Love this little fella
  16. Be gentle, this is my first report ! lol Visited with urban witness, urban sentry & urban tempest After seeing a lot of reports for this place i had wanted to visit it for a while, all i can say it was worth the wait. The only downside is one of us ( me ) forgot spare camera batteries . All that means is a re visit is on the cards asap to get the shots i missed . History stolen from Lowry Jen's report :confused History: George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. The building finally closed in 2004 and has been left abandoned ever since.
  17. 2013: This was a good day out, and in the old Landie it was a trek! I'm not sure how this looks now, but in empty building terms, 4 years is an absolute ETERNITY and its probably knackered now. This was a lovely piece of abandonment and had a wonderful malty smell. 2009: Visited with Fraser (Layz) Mcmullen and sons opened up their brewery in Hertford in 1891. The site was expanded in 1984, with a modern “Brewhouse†built next to the current site. Mcmullens brew cask ales, and pasturised beer in bottles. McMullens produce three regular cask ales and several occasional ales. The regular range consists of Original AK, 3.7% abv 'McMullen's Cask ale' a new, hoppy ale launched 2006 Country, 4.3% The beers are advertised with the tagline 'from the whole hop brewery'. The New site over the road from the old site opened in 2006, making the old site obsolete. More at http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157622814355542/
  18. On the way back from 'Shotgun' I thought it would be nice to nip in and say hello to GBs to grab some wide angle shots... Was ACE!! Love this place!! Only downer was the addition of grafitti up the office stairs!! I'm all for a bit of well placed graf, but here... No! ME NO LIKEY!! Still a crackin' way to spend a few hours... HERES ME PIX... Thanks awfully for looking...
  19. Visited with PROJ3CTM4YH3M and Darbians on a very cold and snowy day. I had no idea what to expect of this place as I had never seen any pictures of it before I went, it was so much better than I could have imagined, absolutely loved it. History: George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. The building finally closed in 2004 and has been left abandoned ever since.
  20. "Weatherby moved to the Falcon works from a smaller works in Tunstall in 1892. The factory was in the Weatherby family until closure in 2000. The works made everything from fancy goods to domestic ware, but their main lines were in Hotel and crested ware. One of the last remaining family-owned pottery firms is to close after more than a century. J H Weatherby and Sons in Hanley is currently being run down and is will soon cease trading after 109 years. Its chairman, Christopher Weatherby, the great-great grandson of company founder John Henry Weatherby, today blamed cut-throat competition in the hotelware business for the firm's decline. At its height the company employed 200, but the figure was down to 50 at the turn of the year and now stands at 10. Mr Weatherby said: ‘‘We have decided to cease trading and are in the process of finishing off stock and things like that. ‘‘Basically we've decided to close down before someone else forced us to – while we are solvent rather than insolvent. ‘‘It's really upsetting. One of the main reasons is for the employees who work here. ‘‘We have had two or three generations of people working here and one of the things I've found warming is their reaction to this. ‘‘They have been very sympathetic and understanding. Everyone who works here has been very happy here.'' The company was founded in Tunstall in 1891 and moved to Hanley the following year. It first made domestic ware such as basins and ewers, later moving into tableware and giftware. The firm also entered the market for hotelware – leading ultimately to its downfall. Mr Weatherby pointed to tough competition from home and abroad for the company's current problems. These included pressure on prices owing to ‘‘block production'' and the concentration of the business in relatively few hands. The 59-year-old added: ‘‘The hotel part of it was more fragmented. That has been changing and it's relying on more standard patterns.'' Mr Weatherby admitted the firm had even considered importing cheaper products from abroad, but was deterred because of the high volumes needed to make the operation profitable. This route was controversially followed by another failed family firm, James Sadler and Sons. Although the Burslem-based family firm went under earlier this year with the loss of 140 jobs, James Sadler Imports Limited continues to trade. Mr Weatherby also partly blamed a planning issue dating back to the early 1970s, which ‘‘blighted'' the family firm and restricted investment in it." Surprisingly good this one and explored with some top humans. My pictures: Thanks
  21. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and then in 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street. They had by this time also increased their product range to include steel files and shoe & butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd.
  22. GEORGE BARNSLEY & SONS LTD, SHEFFIELD. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Me and NK took a mooch round this crackin' old place on a Bobbys fueled whistle stop tour of 'Steel Town'. Brilliant splore! Highly recommend this one, if youve not been then get crackin'!! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ On with some pix... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ THANKS FOR LOOKIN'...
  23. George Barnsley & Sons. Founded in 1836,the original factory was situated on Kelham Island, Sheffield, one of the oldest industrial areas in Sheffield and they specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. In 1837 they were listed in the Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street. In 1852 they were to relocate to Cornish works and by this time they had increased there product range to include butchers knives and steel files. In 1883 George Barnsley was made a Master Cutler. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing, the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd. The company finally ceased trading around 2004. After an extremely adrenaline rush entrance up and down a few rotten ladders we found our way into the building, Quite a dusty place but still pretty awesome First report Thanks for looking! UrbanNoodle!
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