Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'the'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 146 results

  1. Had ours eyes on the closure details of this place for a while and after months of waiting the place was winding down. So rather than wait for full closure we couldn't resist the urge to do a midnight explore, i'd never seen the workings of a brewery, normally just the end product. Had such a laugh doing these in a poo inducing kind of way and wanted to share with you the fruits of the labour.
  2. I couldn't find out very much about this castle. It was built in 1821, I don't know when it has been abandoned. In 1841, the proprietress financed various improvements in the village, like the extension of roads. Exploring the castle was partially quite tricky. Large parts of the floors, ceilings and roofs had already collapsed. A lot of the few remaining floors had holes, most of the stairs were soaked and unstable due to rainwater and moisture. For this reason, only a few areas of the buildung were still reasonably safe accessible. In the end, in this advanced state of decay, the castle is beyond saving, I think. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  3. Bit of very old derp for you
  4. It is alas more DEPy now Lavino Solar Fires and Fireplaces Ltd Flintshire
  5. A nice local one today; had many a great night in here it closed in 2012 with the building of the new by pass killing trade Only accessed the pub the adjoining function suite locked tight shut alas Friday night in the adjoining converted barn was rock night in the 70s as a teenager
  6. A nice way to spend my Bank Holiday Monday. May 2019 Full Video....
  7. I been retired pretty much from the explore scene now for about 18 months and had the opportunity to spend the day with my Daughter in Hampshire so took the kids for a traipse in the woods..was told there was an old cottage that was boarded up near one the many trails..we found it and saw it was wide open so had a look around..nothing much left except a few fire places but the kids loved it so mission accomplished. After a bit of a walk,we spotted said house Closer now Kitchen cum Dining room range Just a few holes,nothing to worry about.. Living room Bedroom Front door with entrance down to the basement. Basement And finally,the fire place in the basement. So that was the foresters house..I was told it was haunted but I have yet to substantiate this claim.
  8. Sometimes I love my satnav today it took me a new route to the local cider farm rubber necking as i go along i spy a rather dilpidated chimney stack through the trees have a mooch? well it would be rude not to Built in 1812 thats all I know some nice stuff AND it is untouched by kids or taggers maybe I took its urbex virginity? lol
  9. I visited this little cemetery a few times in the last years cause it's not far from my home town. It is nothing unique but in the early daylight or the late evening light the atmosphere is fine. The pictures I made there before were not that bad but also not that special. This time it changed. We created a very special atmosphere with some artificial fog. This was only possible cause this day there was absolutely no wind. I really like the result, what do you think? 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
  10. A trip through an abandoned pig slaughterhouse. Here you can follow the last path of a pig. 1 round them up IMG_1974-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 dead pig walking IMG_1990-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 shocking IMG_1994-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 beginning of processing IMG_1929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 cleaning IMG_1922-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 hair trim IMG_1927-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 hair removing IMG_1973 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 waist disposal IMG_1967-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 chop them up IMG_1915-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 piece by piece IMG_1920-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 meat chain IMG_1961-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 to the freezer IMG_1938-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  11. So this place has nothing now but memories and juvenile grafitti The Witch Ball Inn was popular with the army guys in the 1940s, due to its proximity to Prees Heath airfield. In particular the Americans stationed there took a special liking to it. And yet after that there's very little on the place. It boasted an impressive function room and a now filled-in swimming pool, At some point in the 1980s the building came under new ownership and the name changed to The Cherry Tree Hotel. The swimming pool was actually converted into a fish pond, and a fountain was installed in the bar area. The pub was visited by Michael Cain whenever he was in the area visiting his daughter. it closed down, around 2005 was boarded up and then was consequentially plundered and trashed.
  12. In the middle of the woods, they appear all of a sudden: giant walls and ruins as well as holes hidden beneath branchwood and covered by foliage - the remnants of an old shooting range of the German Wehrmacht (the armed forces of Nazi-Germany). Even the soil itself is still cotaminated by bullets and casings. The remains can be identified as ammunition from the Wehrmacht as well as from the Bundeswehr and the US-Army, which prove that all of these three armies used the area for their shooting exercises. Unfortunately, I haven´t come across confirmed historical sources concerning the former shooting range, but it seems to be obvious that the area was a shooting range built by the Wehrmacht. Not confirmed sources indicate that the US-Americans blasted the buildings after World War II. After the destruction the area was apparently still used for military exercises on occasion. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  13. A night in the Paris Metro My first report for a while and I felt that my photos from each location wouldn't create a substantial enough report. Because of this I decided to compile them into a more lengthy post documenting the night in which we explored various sections of the Paris Metro. I hope you enjoy reading my story and seeing the images I managed to capture. After arriving in Paris with @Letchbo for a short weekend break, we decided to begin our night of exploring by hitting a classic metro spot. Once we'd safely entered the area we wanted to photograph, we hid in an alcove for a short period of time. Patiently waiting for the end of service with front row seats to watch the last remaining trains hurl past us. As soon the service concluded for the night, we eagerly got our cameras out and started shooting. Fortunately we managed to grab a couple of decent photos before we heard what we presumed were track workers approaching nearby. We quickly concluded it was best to abort mission and keep moving ahead. Photographing sections of track as we progressed down the line, until we reached the next station and swiftly departed unnoticed. By the time we were back out above ground the night was still young and we headed onto our next location. View of a train passing on Line 10 The double raccord We'd visited this spot earlier in the year along with @Conrad and @DirtyJigsaw after visiting another of Paris' famous ghost stations. But when we arrived at this one, we noticed a large number workers across the tracks and decided to give it a miss. Fast forward to October, we thought try our luck again. My partner made his way over the fence but as I was about to climb in and join him, someone abruptly stopped me in my tracks. "Bonsoir!" "Bonsoir?" The rather authoritative looking chap approached me and continued speaking to me in French (to which I didn't fully understand.) I politely explained we were English. He then proceeded to pull a badge out and clearly stated to me the word every urban explorer wants to hear on a night out exploring the metro. "Police." Oh fuck. That's when we thought the night had sadly come to a prompt conclusion. Fortunately for us after a brief discussion with us claiming to be photographing the canal, he decided to allow us to resume our business and once he was well out of sight we made our way straight in. Onto a bit of history, Arsenal station was officially opened in 1906 and is located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. In addition to this, it is also situated on line 5 between the Bastille and Quai de la Rapée stations. After 33 years of operation, it was closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. This was due to French resistance members allocating the area as an ammunition depot. Once Paris had been liberated from German forces August of 1944, a battle more commonly known as Battle for Paris and Belgium. It was decided reopening Arsenal would be inefficient. This was on account of its close proximity to neighbouring stations which limited the flow of passengers. For 75 years the station has been largely abandoned aside from graffers, urban explorers, photographers and avid thrill seekers, such as ourselves. Once we'd grabbed a few shots of the abandoned Arsenal Station, we continued photographing another small section of track further down the line. It was quite photogenic and was a welcomed bonus to what had already been a predominately successful night for the both of us. Before long the morning was fast approaching, coinciding with the threat of the service resuming. We reluctantly called it a night, making our way out and back to our accommodation, covered in metro dust and feeling pretty relieved we managed to pull it all off after a few close encounters. As always if you got this far, thanks for reading
  14. Hi everyone. I am Craig, I am English but live in the Netherlands (right up the top right part). I have been interested in old places for a while. Just did not realise it was a "Thing" I travel tracks and trails around Europe and love stumbling across old places off the beaten track.
  15. A explore of an old slate mine. The mining started a few hundred years ago but is abandoned for several decades. This mine is not the safest and some parts are already collapsed. All the train rails are gone but you can see where they were. Only some bats live in these parts now. The white dots on the walls are all dead spiders with a layer of calcium. Not sure why there were so much dead spiders there. The person with whom I exploring with had done the research of this mine. You had to walk some distance through the woods to get to the entrance. . There was yet another level but we couldn't make a safe connection point for a rope so we skipped that. It was a steep incline 10 meters down. 1 all the white dots are dead spiders. IMG_3796 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 left or right IMG_3824 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_3820 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 going down IMG_3813 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 triangle corridor IMG_3801 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 accidents are bound to happen.... IMG_3810 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 a steep incline IMG_3803 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 more inclines IMG_3792-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  16. have passed this often and today thought lets have a look; it is a former station masters house on the hawarden Loop; a once thriving goods and passenger depot Well that was a waste of 15 mins I must say!!! still here is my wonderous adventure
  17. March 2019 Situated in picturesque Gog Countryt his former care home for the elderly recently sold at auction for £600k is huge inside with a few bits and bobs; and some alas goontuber tagging a lot has changed since other explorers have been onsite last year
  18. Just a small plane in a forest
  19. A rather apt explore after exploring an Iron Works earlier in the morning! After Stanton, Mookster and I headed for this little industrial Gem and met Mattdonut and James Smith inside. It was a bit of a trek through some undergrowth and tumbledown sheds full of all the old moulds and casts; but it was well worth it. The original company at this premises began manufacturing cast iron pipes back in the 1940s. By the 1980s; there was a management buy out and the company was renamed. It then closed again around two decades later and again; changed hands and was renamed; remaining in operation until it closed for the final time a few years ago. The whole site is split in two by a lovely iron railway bridge with the casting storage sheds and workshops on one side and the main foundry building on the other side of the bridge. It was a lovely treasure trove of an explore with plenty to see inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 Thanks For Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706470238285
  20. it looks like this place is being cleaned up or there are squatters; a mate went 3 hours after me and there was a guy on site working; alas someone has nicked all the dildos; vainglorious dickheads have also been on site "tagging" still some cracking vintage porn to be seen as well as some great items the guy was sure a hoarder
  21. During the Cold War, this bunker was built as an auxiliary hospital. The overlying school was opened in the 60s while the hospital was officially inaugurated in the 80s. It offered 2,370 places and never went into operation. At the turn of the millennium, it was relieved of its responsibilities, the inventory transferred to other states, and the hospital will be soon demolished.
  22. The above ground part of an old slate mine. This one was quite deep but unfortunately totally flooded now. This one is in the centre of a small village so care needed to be taken not to bee seen. There is also the administrative building but that one seems to get renovated,hence the new coat of paint. Also the camera on the side was a good indication. The slate and the miners went down on the same structure. Not sure what the future will bring for this one. Most likely demolishing. 1 IMG_3749-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_3784-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_3777-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_3770-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_3759-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_3736-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_3721-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 IMG_3724 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9IMG_3743 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 IMG_3742-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  23. According to a report in August 2018 there were 18 pubs closing in the UK every week with 476 closures in the first 6 months of that year. It's a sobering (sorry) thought for someone like me who appreciates an ale or six in a nice hostelry. There are records showing The Bridge Inn here going back to around 1875 although how far back it dates is unclear. It closed permanently in 2013 and planning permission was given for change of use. I had the feeling that work was starting on redeveloping it when I was there. The Welsh name is Tafarn Y Bont - I wouldn't say there's anything that makes it distinctly Welsh - but its a good example of a traditional British pub which still has a few old features. It was nice that it seemed pretty untouched in the years since it closed.
  24. New member here, but far from new to urbex. I have always had an interest in exploring and adventuring within abandoned locations. When I explore I take images and video and I upload to my YouTube channel. I notice that there appears to be a fairly sizable rift between Stills photographers and videographers (mainly YouTubers). As I said before I am a YouTuber but I don't beg for likes and subscriptions. I research locations, explore it and document it. None of this "smash the like button" or "nearly died" fakery that a lot of video people do simply to generate exposure. I think genuine urban explorers whether they are stills people or video people actually have more in common than they think and Perhaps we should be more worried about outright fakery that occurs on both sides of the spectrum. Within the YouTube urbex community, there is a genuine distaste for people who are creating fake content. The term that is widely used is "urbex theatre". It's a work of fiction, dressed up to be an explore. The same occurs within the photography sector where people are manipulating images to the extent they do not even resemble the original location. There are also situations where people rearrange locations to set up their shots (photo or video) and this really just takes away from the whole abandoned theme. Genuine explorers are genuine explorers regardless of the medium you choose to record your explores on, or the platform you choose to display your work. Would love to hear your thoughts on this...
  25. Hello everybody. Today I want to share an especially untouched location with you guys. This resort has been closed since the early 2000's and has since then been sitting around in Austria. Due to its remote location, there was no vandalism beside two broken down windows. Originally, this was used as a rehabilitation center for the elderly, as far as I know. Also located on site are a medical facility for routine check-ups and dietary advice. I'd say this was the best location I ever visited in terms of how well it was preserved. Full Album (Flickr): https://flic.kr/s/aHskMyQEbT Instagram: @ofcdnb Raw Exploration (YouTube) !no ads and not selling shit, if anyone is concerned with that, just sharing explorations!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odJKQwaVas0 DSC_3688.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3690.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3692.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3697.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3710.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3712.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3716.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3718.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3732.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3744.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3751.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3763.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3765.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3775.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3776.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3777.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3780.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3783.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3784.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3798.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3816.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3825.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3833.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3845.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3846.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3855.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3858.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3859.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3861.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3862.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3864.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3872.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3886.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3888.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3889.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3890.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3899.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3901.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
×