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  1. A night in the Paris Metro My first report for a while and I felt that my photos from each location wouldn't create a substantial enough report. Because of this I decided to compile them into a more lengthy post documenting the night in which we explored various sections of the Paris Metro. I hope you enjoy reading my story and seeing the images I managed to capture. After arriving in Paris with @Letchbo for a short weekend break, we decided to begin our night of exploring by hitting a classic metro spot. Once we'd safely entered the area we wanted to photograph, we hid in an alcove for a short period of time. Patiently waiting for the end of service with front row seats to watch the last remaining trains hurl past us. As soon the service concluded for the night, we eagerly got our cameras out and started shooting. Fortunately we managed to grab a couple of decent photos before we heard what we presumed were track workers approaching nearby. We quickly concluded it was best to abort mission and keep moving ahead. Photographing sections of track as we progressed down the line, until we reached the next station and swiftly departed unnoticed. By the time we were back out above ground the night was still young and we headed onto our next location. View of a train passing on Line 10 The double raccord We'd visited this spot earlier in the year along with @Conrad and @DirtyJigsaw after visiting another of Paris' famous ghost stations. But when we arrived at this one, we noticed a large number workers across the tracks and decided to give it a miss. Fast forward to October, we thought try our luck again. My partner made his way over the fence but as I was about to climb in and join him, someone abruptly stopped me in my tracks. "Bonsoir!" "Bonsoir?" The rather authoritative looking chap approached me and continued speaking to me in French (to which I didn't fully understand.) I politely explained we were English. He then proceeded to pull a badge out and clearly stated to me the word every urban explorer wants to hear on a night out exploring the metro. "Police." Oh fuck. That's when we thought the night had sadly come to a prompt conclusion. Fortunately for us after a brief discussion with us claiming to be photographing the canal, he decided to allow us to resume our business and once he was well out of sight we made our way straight in. Onto a bit of history, Arsenal station was officially opened in 1906 and is located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. In addition to this, it is also situated on line 5 between the Bastille and Quai de la Rapée stations. After 33 years of operation, it was closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. This was due to French resistance members allocating the area as an ammunition depot. Once Paris had been liberated from German forces August of 1944, a battle more commonly known as Battle for Paris and Belgium. It was decided reopening Arsenal would be inefficient. This was on account of its close proximity to neighbouring stations which limited the flow of passengers. For 75 years the station has been largely abandoned aside from graffers, urban explorers, photographers and avid thrill seekers, such as ourselves. Once we'd grabbed a few shots of the abandoned Arsenal Station, we continued photographing another small section of track further down the line. It was quite photogenic and was a welcomed bonus to what had already been a predominately successful night for the both of us. Before long the morning was fast approaching, coinciding with the threat of the service resuming. We reluctantly called it a night, making our way out and back to our accommodation, covered in metro dust and feeling pretty relieved we managed to pull it all off after a few close encounters. As always if you got this far, thanks for reading
  2. I didn't go to Romania with the intention for exploring, I went for a good friends wedding and hadn't even looked at the possibility of skulking around a derp. It turns out on our drive up into the mountains of Prahova, there is an abundance of derelict buildings, closed factories and other sundries left over from the communist era - we passed a huge oil refinery that looked half smashed, yet is still in use apparently; Sinaia has a large fuel injection system manufacturing concern that looks disused, but still builds components for the German companies! There was lots if you were looking for it. But, we didn't come for this. We came for a wedding and a break in the mountains - it is a stunning country and I would highly recommend it. It was only after driving back down from the cable car (awesome 70s retro thing) in Sinaia did we notice a large reinforced concrete Berm. I don't think the car had pulled to a stop before I was running into the bushes, forgetting the warnings of black bears. [/span]From what I can make out (information is limited for obvious reasons), but the track was built between 1974 & 1976. Beyond this, I know nothing else other than it may have been still in use as late as 2009. The course had 11-14 turns. Visited with a whole bunch of non-forum members, for obvious reasons! Anyway, photos Start Area - totally trashed! Run up with start ramp (presumably for another sport) Rickety bridge over the mountain road Banked turn just after the bridge (I expect they were flying by this point) Some sort of stores building - there was a smaller start ramp onto the track here, presumably for beginners Final Bend Finish line and timing booth (now someones house)
  3. Various bits of cobbled together footage from exploring metro systems in London and overseas. (The end bit at Aldwych is an in-joke). https://vimeo.com/31108510 There's stuff from New York and skyscrapers and stuff on the account, as well as a trip to North Korea. I rarely film, so not much on there.
  4. I took a look around this place back in March and posted it on another UE site but since joining up on here I thought I'd share it on here as well After reading in the local rag (Leyland Guardian) that planning permission has been submitted and is very likely to be passed on building 750 homes and employment units, I decided to get a look at the old girl again before she disappears for good just like the rest of Leyland's industrial heritage. Not much history is written about this place but from what I can gather, it was built in the mid to late 70s as a replacement for the 1st Test Track that was situated off Hall Lane in Leyland. As Leyland was considered one of Britain's biggest industrial towns with the Motors site taking up most of the town, it is pretty sad to see that hardly any traces of it remain. We are bombarded with reminders of Leyland's illustrious past and rich industrial heritage yet it's being mothballed to an extent that hardly any of the workers from Leyland Motors barely recognise. Upto now, this unique site has survived the bulldozers but not so much the Pikeys. A lot of the drain covers have been stolen, leaving dangerous 7-10ft drops at the side of the track and the workshop has suffered considerable damage since I visited here in March. Anyways, on with the pictures... Just as you get through the access point, look to the left and you're greeted by this which I thought was quite amusing. Seeing as the Leyland Cross cobbles were covered over in the last two years, I'd say these are the last set of cobbles in Leyland. I wonder if this is the original sign... Where once there was industry I think this safety barrier might've been pikeyed a bit. Those sweeping corners and high cambers would make for a huge amount of fun around here. This is the bridge that was used to gain access from the roads to test the trucks and buses. A look out from the bridge. The Eyes That No Longer See. Finally, the Track begins to Give Way to nature. Thanks for looking...
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