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Found 3 results

  1. In classic Harry style; this forms part of another explore backlog! I visited here in November 2018 with Mookster. It formed part of a little Midland Roadtrip we did that day. We all know what to expect with this place; its pretty pillaged now, access was a doddle and it was full of other explorers; something which seems to be a much more frequent occurrence these days! We met some really nice people here and had a relaxed half hour or so before moving to the next site. The Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903 and was known a local landmark in Birmingham. Tea production began here in the 30's; and survived bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. in 1968; Typhoo merged with Schweppes and with Cadbury the following year, forming Cadbury-Schweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978 as a tea making facility; but remained open as a clothes warehouse until around 2008. The grounds, which are currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park (very handy for exploring!), have been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to turn the site into a brand new university campus for the Birmingham City University. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704773968425
  2. The History Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903, was known as one of Birmingham's most prominent landmarks. The factory was used for tea production from the 1930's, surviving bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. Typhoo merged with Schweppes in 1968 and the following year merged with Cadbury to form Cadbury Scweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978. The site, which is currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park, has been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to be turned into a university campus for Birmingham City University. The Explore So after months and months of constantly checking this place, access finally popped up during a Birmingham trip with @plod and some other users from 28. We started the day off with the usual quote of "lets check typhoo again even though we won't get in", followed by our customary perimeter check for access and another visit to the boiler room, and surprisingly we managed to find an access point which had evidently come up fairly recently so our timing was spot on there. We spent a good 3 or 4 hours exploring the tea factory as well as S Rose & Co; there was a lot to look around (and we did get lost a few times, we had more trouble finding our way out than trying to find a way in!) although sadly nothing much was left there which was a bit disappointing as nobody would have guessed what it was by looking at the place, but it was still definitely worth the trip. Despite the failures it was a pretty successful day.
  3. Not much to say about this place really, we came across this while trying to find a way into the main factory (which is still impossible to get into), there isn't much to it but I haven't seen anyone else mention it before. The building has 3 boilers and some electrical equipment, as well as some documents including workers' reports and manuals explaining how to use the equipment. It seems the druggies have recently found this place which is a shame since it was mostly untouched the first time i visited.
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