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Found 16 results

  1. Swan Meadow Mill was built by James Eckersley in 1827 and became Old Mill when a new, larger mill was built in 1838. It was demolished in 1960 followed in 1963 by the larger mill. James Eckersley and Sons had three four-storey mills by 1880.Musgraves of Bolton supplied a tandem compound steam engine in 1884.Eckersleys ran six spinning mills and two weaving sheds in the town, Swan Meadow Old, Swan Meadow large, Water Heyes, and Western Mills No.1, No.2 and No.3. The mills housed a total of 236,572 ring spindles, 14,554 mule spindles and 1687 loom. It's a massive complex and there just seems to be mills everywhere here. Deffo loads more to see and more look disused. We just ran out of time to check the rest out. Visited with @Ferret The damp derpier mills most recent use looks to have been a motorbike\scooter garage. The larger mill was used as a multi level go kart track and then more recently airsoft and paintball. Not a bad mill to be fair. Had a good laugh messing about on a kids go kart. The engine house is a B E A UT.
  2. Hope the photo file sizes are good as I had to reduce them due to the cap. Brockmill first began operations around the mid-1700s and further expanded when the Earl of Balcarres bought the mill and built a furnace at Haigh foundry half a mile downstream. The two sights prospered building large steam cylinders and fire engines also building the first locomotive for Lancashire, and plenty more to follow. Later the mill expanded into brick and textile making, however, the works closed in 1885 more recently the mill was used for the production of herbal medicine Unfortunately, i found no date as to when production stopped I'm sure you'll agree though guy's it's a wonderful explore in a serene location.
  3. The beautiful post-apocalyptic page field mill - Video Report
  4. Rylands Mill - Pagefield College campus - Video Report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Hope this video report meets the standards for the sight, any feedback greatly appreciated as I just want to share my experiences with you guys not start selling caps and tee shirts and begging you to subscribe thanks.
  5. Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.
  6. Brock Mill video and photographic reports - 5/2/2018 A quality explore that we really enjoyed. Not the most architecturally stunning but still there's a certain beauty about decay.
  7. Ok time to get some stuff up outta my large back log lol. History seems a little weak on this but im sure you know it by now. Explore : Ok took 2 atempts due to gardeners round back being nosey lol. And also the original planned way was sealed. Overall was a decent mooch @stranton joined me on this adventure lol. And moaned all the way. To be honest the classrooms where best bit ohhhhh and strantons now famous train lol. Anyway thanks to @Vulex for first heads up on this. Sorry i aint been posting much i deffo been getting lazy :-(.. Not sue exact date it was in 2015. Anyways on with pics. Found this heartwarming a single drawing left behind.. I tried to catch the sunset has i did the street lamps came on. It created this lol Has always thanks to everyone for looking its very apreciated .. See you soon all.
  8. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  9. The Visit Considered this one in the past but lots of activity next door at the tile shop so difficult to access unnoticed at times. Passing on an early morning we thought we'd have a quick look about. Lasting memory of this place is the pigeon sh*t! Never seen it so deep anywhere The History Built in 1861, St Joseph's Catholic Church is a grade II listed building on the fringe of Wigan town centre and was the Sunday school of a certain George Formby. It's been closed since 1995 and is a burden around the church's neck. They (and Wigan Council) are hoping someone comes along and takes it under their wing in this quarter's redevelopment of the mills and waterfront area. An example of quite how deep the bird poo is in here
  10. We came across this looking for some underground stuff and was a nice little find. Since we went I have seen in the news that parts of it have been set on fire and unsafe. History.. In 1819, Rylands & Sons were established with their seat of operations being in Wigan. John, the youngest partner, occupied himself with travelling over several counties for orders until 1823, when he opened a warehouse for the firm in Manchester. Business increased rapidly, and in the course of a few years extensive properties at Wigan, along with dye works and bleach works, were purchased. Valuable seams of coal were afterwards discovered under these properties, and proved a great source of wealth to the purchasers. From 1847, John Rylands became sole proprietor of the company owing to the death of his father and retirement of his brothers around 1839. Designed by George Woodhouse in 1866, Rylands Mill was built and had served the local population for work until the overall demise of the textile industry had taken it's toll across the country. In 1985 it became an annexe to Wigan Technical College and became better known as the Pagefield Building until closure in 2007. The facade along the front was repointed and boasts some wonderful brick pattern work, this mill being the most expensive around at the time it was built. Owners Tower Gate recieved planning consent from the Planning committee for residential and office use but have yet to start any work onsite. There is a three year expiry date in which works must start or another plannning application must be lodged.
  11. I visited here with Lavino and a non member Tom, This was our second visit to the mansion ( as the first time I didn't have my own camera ) and unlike our first visit we managed to get to the upper floors. And people have been saying a lot that this place is un safe and I totally agree with them . On the upper floors it is a lot more decayed than the ground floors as Lavino learned when trying to open a door. We also managed to get onto the roof which has an amazing view and is just a great place to sit down for a few minutes. On the way out we decided we would look for the grave of the owners horse which we thought we saw in the middle of the crops, but when we got to it it was just a lion statue after we took some pictures of it the farmer came with his quad and gun, and he didn't look very happy ( guess it didn't help we were in the middle of his crops ). Anyway here is a bit of history and some pictures hope you enjoy . The mansion was built around 1580 for the Winstanley family. It is a Grade II listed building and also listed as a Ancient Scheduled Monument. The Winstanleys owned this Elizabethan Hall until 1596, when the estate was sold to James Bankes, a London goldsmith and banker. Extra blocks were added in the 17th and 18th centuries. Further and extensive alterations were made in 1811-19 by Lewis Wyatt in a Jacobean style.. To the south, on lands belonging to the hall, is a small stone building which was used to house bears that provided entertainment for the hall's guests The stable court and other buildings to the side of the main house are a prize example of English eccentricity, designed with a heady mix of Norman, Tudor and Baroque motifs. They were built by Meyrick Bankes II a colourful character who travelled extensively in Europe and America and adorned his grounds with statues of animals and monsters The Bankes family retained ownership of the hall until the 21st century when it was sold for private development. The hall had been kept in good condition until the 1960s when habitation stopped. As the building decayed and the cost of maintaining the mansion was too much for the family it was sold on and any intended plans for redevelopment have failed leaving the building to decay rapidly.
  12. I have been doing stuff around the north west of England quite a lot recently,and so I am also looking forward to getting new places done and sharing some of my older visits with everyone . Im also looking forward to seeing some of you guys around .
  13. After a few short visits here it was great to finally spend a full day here, really lets you see its hidden beauty. Cant even begin to describe the fun I had here today was a great visit and im not gonna bore you all with a bit of crappy history off Wikipedia because you all know it... Thanks for looking feedback would be helpfull
  14. hi all frank here new to the site and hope youll go easy on me and hopefully get my first report up once i find my way round and work out a few things
  15. I had seen a couple of pics from the tunnels under the Mesnes park in Wigan and a newspaper article that they were due to be capped off, I was passing by so decided for a dinner time explore to see if I could locate them. http://www.wigantoday.net/news/jordan-has-tunnel-vision-1-765754 With nothing more than the name of the park and a smart phone I pulled up to see what I could find 10 minutes and I was climbing down the ladder and into the darkness, isn't technology brilliant Sadly I snapped my tripod a few days ago so these are handheld . .
  16. this was my first time back here in over 3 years and the place has got a hell of a lot worse, most of the stairs have gone and a lot of the ceilings have collapsed or ready to. The hall was built in the 1560s for the Winstanley family of Wigan; the Winstanley family were lords of the manor since at least 1252 and may have been responsible for building the moat on the site. The Winstanleys owned the hall until 1596, when the estate was sold to James Bankes, a London goldsmith and banker. Winstanley Hall has three storeys and has a date stone with a date of 1584, but this is not in situ so may not provide an accurate date for the construction of the house. Extra blocks were added in the 17th and 18th centuries. Further and extensive alterations were made in 1811-19 by Lewis Wyatt in a Jacobean style. He moved the entrance to the left flank of the hall and replacing the original entrance with a window. The Bankes family retained ownership of the hall until the 21st century when it was sold for private development. The hall had been kept in good condition until the 1960s when habitation stopped. As the building decayed and the cost of maintaining Winstanley Hall was too much for the family it was sold on i found a bunker in the grounds also had time for a bath
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