Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'wiltshire'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 12 results

  1. Monkton Farleigh Down, Ammunition Tunnel, Wiltshire – December 2017 Moving on through my backlog of explores; to one myself and Mookster visited back in December. It was to be a nice, slow paced Pre-Christmas day of explores; but sadly this was to be the only site we explored that day. Unfortunately my car had developed an exhaust leak that morning and the rest of the day was rather noisy until the vehicle was repaired. The Monkton Farleigh ammunition depot made use of an old stone quarry below a plateau; around 450 feet above the valley floor in which ran the main line railway. This railway was its principal source of supply. Before the depot could be commissioned, an efficient means was required to bring in ammunition from the railway at Farleigh Down Sidings. These sidings were just over a mile from the depot as the crow flies but over four miles by road along pretty heavy going, tortuous country lanes. The tunnel at Monkton Farleigh was designed to handle around 1000 tons of ammunition each day. Completion was not scheduled until 1941. The tunnel to the railway sidings at Shockerwick was a big player in the Monkton Farleigh mine; offering a secure route which in turn, was invisible to aerial reconnaissance. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 As Always everyone, Thanks! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157665020437557
  2. With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  3. Tottenham House is the centrepiece of the historic Tottenham estate in Wiltshire, England. The grade I listed house has 103 rooms and mostly dates from the 1820s when it was remodelled by Charles Brudenell-Bruce of Ailesbury. Set in forestry land that originally stretched for over 100 square miles, the extensive estate was partly used as a deer park and the deer still roam the lands to this day. The estate was the home of Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII, who died giving birth to the future king Edward VI. Henry VIII, a keen deer-hunter, regularly stayed there as a guest of Sir John Seymour, Jane’s father. The Ailesbury family lived in Tottenham House and shared it with the US Army during the Second World War. They moved out in 1946, at which point Hawtreys Preparatory School used the house until 1994. In 1966 the house was designated as Grade I listed, and the 50-horse stable block and octagonal folly in the deer park were designated Grade II listed. Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. All the walls in this room were lined with marble... The circular music room with ornate dome ceiling is stunning And finally a few externals
  4. just a quick one, not going to write an esssay on this one as it's been done a hundered times and i really need to go do some christmas shopping! visited with 3 non memmbers before heading to certain social event around the corner. was a banging day, wanted to see box for ages and from what i gather took in the majority of the cool bits and bobs down there, the robots, some cranes, the door and of course cathedral. Was nice going down with someone experiences as he knew a lot about the workings of the mine and would point out cool things that might have gone unnoticed, crane anchor points and erosion in certain places caused by the ropes hauling the stone around corners. History courtesy of http://www.subterraneanhistory.co.uk/ This mine has been worked over centuries (probably back to Roman times) and extends many miles. It is located in the village of Box, near Bath. It was used to extract limestone which was used to build many of the buildings in the local area and had military uses during WW2. Box is now a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest, on account of the number of bat species which reside in the mine. There are many famous sites to see within Box Mine including the Cathedral (an open shaft to the surface) and the robots (a large number of bricks which people have taken to making into robots and other things). have a great christmas kids
  5. This was my 2nd mine/quarry of the day that i visited, again a lovely place, a bit more touristy but pretty safe and easy access, plenty too see with the old graffiti and horse shoe markings etc, and also a really well preserved crane. another one that i will be going back to visit as a few bits i didnt see inside and to the east and west outside of the mine. little bit of borrowed history: "Kingsdown Quarry also commonly known as Swan Mine is a small bath stone quarry lying under the hillside along the road from Bathford to Kingsdown. The Main entrance to the quarry is opposite the Swan Inn which was once the Quarry managers house, the inn its self is held to the hill side by great iron chains anchored ito the buried workings of the quarry itself. Kingsdown Quarry was producing stone as far back as 1833." enjoy the pics alan.
  6. This was our first port of call for the evening and it didnt disappoint,not only did i manage not to get lost but i didnt get stuck in that awkward crevice which is the known as the letter box(i think). Visited with Obscurity and non member John. History Blatantly stolen Kingsdown Quarry also commonly known as Swan Mine is a small bath stone quarry lying under the hillside along the road from Bathford to Kingsdown. The Main entrance to the quarry is opposite the Swan Inn which was once the Quarry managers house, the inn its self is held to the hill side by great iron chains anchored ito the buried workings of the quarry itself. Kingsdown Quarry was producing stone as far back as 1833. ] Thanks for looking!
  7. What ho chaps,just a quickie to say hi.I was directed here by his Nellyship and was known as oldscrote in another place.
  8. Visted With Phill, Les, Ben, and myself, we arrived a little late to the proposed meet-up, because we got breakfast - omnomnom we managed to gain access via the wrong grill. but never-the-less, armed with a map and a compass we made our way around, Starting at cathedral we followed our noses to the smell of a fresh bbq, to see a pre-lit foil tray with no food but never mind! we plodded on, after speaking to two people who stayed over night.we attempted to get to the northern section (as we thought this was where everyone was headed), so following the map we soon lost track of where on the map we were, so vaguely following north, we somehow ended up going around 4 times and thought lets try and get back to catherdral and start again, so we plotted and pondered and eventually we turned up, about 1-2pm just as everyone finish a group shot as was on their way out, so after a few minutes to get our breath back and say our goodbyes, we decided to head back to the entrance and head to the northern section once more. So after a few twists and turns, over a few falls, we still got lost, but suddenly we saw a sign! a big square tank, after looking at the map, it sure was a eureka moment! So yeah after that we didnt get lost again, but on the way out we ended up getting trapped in the dead routes once more and could find the way home! but needless to say, we're alive! Also thanks to Phill, Les, Ben for lighting up the tunnels, and inviting me along! Anywho, sorry to drag on a bit, but here's some photos =) Thanks! Please check Out my other photos! http://www.flickr.com/photos/mperryphotography/
  9. Another one for the archives really,but still important as most if not all of what I filmed is still there.First visited in 2005 for a post sunday dinner walk,then became one of my obsessions.Be gentle with the quality of pics due to me using a simple Kodak Digi point n shoot..never got into DSLR`s till late in my Urbex career. Some History: Yatesbury is a village adjacent to Cherhill on the A4 road between Calne and Marlborough in Wiltshire, England. RAF Yatesbury is a former Royal Air Force airfield well known to many airmen who served in the second world war. The airfield was first established in the first world war and was developed into a permanent camp in the interwar years especially from 1936 onwards before finally closing in the 1960s. Before closure the camp was home to the Radar and Wireless training school which transferred to Locking .The aircraft hangars and air strip, although now farmland, can still be seen from the A4. Yatesbury today has a population of approximately 150 people. And that was Yatesbury early 2005..more to come sadly!!!
  10. This was day 2 of our Wiltshire trip and was really nice to explore,must admit i personally didnt wander as far as frosty and tb's did as the farmhouse cider had well and truely kicked in so myself maniac and obscurity had a shorter wander on our own.Raptor jesusturned up in the middle of the night which was a nice touch to the evening More info can be found here..http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown's_Folly Could have covered more ground but id had cider and feet where killing me and all the tea lights looked pretty !
×