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Found 94 results

  1. This area was a powerplant of a coalmine.
  2. This time I was actually in vacation with two friends of mine (they aren't explorers), but while we were organising all of our trip we decided to explore this abandoned and untouched printing works (hope that this is a proper name) that I had discovered a few weeks before. Those 2 guys were a couple of graphic designers so they enjoyed the visit even more. This plant used to create mostly the "Action Transfers", which are called "Trasferelli" in Italy: today they are produced mostly on commission and not for business. If you want the complete album, here it is: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmr2nWrm
  3. A Visit to a Abandoned Locomotive Works, was in Germany. This site was given to us from a friend and so off we went to check it out.
  4. History This Octel site in Amlwch was chosen in 1949 to collect bromine from the sea, it was picked by H Fossett and R O Gibson because of the strong tidal flow, the depth of the sea in the area and gulf stream sea temperatures. The plant was built and finished construction in 1952, ready to start collecting the bromine out of the sea. The site was officially owned by Octel until 1989 when the production of bromine chemicals became more important which resulted in Great Lakes purchasing the site due to them specialising in bromine chemistry. In 1995, one of the BOT2’s that was used for collecting bromine chemicals was badly damaged by a fire that occurred on the site. Two of the 30-metre towers were destroyed and around 5 people were injured. Octel bromine works started their operations in 1952 and closed in 2004. Canatxx purchased the site and announced plans to turn the site into a liquid natural gas storage site. Our Visit This is one site that we have kept our eye on for a while, but never got around to visiting. Finally, we decided to pay the site a little visit and we were not disappointed with what it had to offer. We made sure to visit on a sunny, bright day so we could spend as much time as we needed to explore the whole site. It took us a good few hours to explore the whole site but was definitely worth the time and drive there.
  5. I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
  6. Another season; another backlog, this shiftwork sure makes you a bit slower! I visited this site back at the end of March with Mookster and a non forum member. I have posted several reports after this one, but for some reason this one slipped the net. It was operated by Pilkington Glass up until the 1960's where sand was washed prior to the production of glass. The site is in St Helens, Merseyside and is an absolute mission to get into through mud, undergrowth and then in through a rust water filled basement. Its a wonder non f us fell into the water. I Accidentally shot these in JPEG so the editing is a bit ropey. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157698933151464
  7. An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  8. I was passing here today on way home from work so called in to have a look ...Quite a nice little explore ☺️
  9. This made up part of an epic road trip back in September 2011. Haven't been on a UK one like this in a while! Who's up for one?! It was called the Dirty Stinkin Northern Road Trip I think this place may be demolished now, but it was quite an interesting explore, even if we did get thrown out before we explored the top floor. Least the security fella was a top bloke! Gave me his badge! haha
  10. Not much online about this one, it used to be a smelting yard which also carried out other work such as Automotive and presumably welding of sorts. A nice little mooch for 45 mins or so. Its had a recent fire, unfortunately destroying quite a rare model of Datsun stored inside. Visited with Mookster and our American Explorer friend on a February Northern Road Trip. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157668230304678
  11. History After the beginning of the 1860s gas was widely used as a means of lighting So the first gas works of Eisenach were put into operation on 1 October 1862. However, the line capacity was no longer sufficient soon, because the gas consumption had quadrupled from 1888 to 1912. Therefore, the construction of the new gas works began in 1898, and the old gas works were shut down in 1899. The new gas works had its own rail connection for coal transport. In 1901, already more than 1.5 million m³ of city gas were produced. In 1912 there were a total of 938 public gas lanterns in Eisenach. The street lighting cost 46600 marks per year, equivalent to 1.20 marks per inhabitant. In 1912, 150 gas lanterns were remotely ignited and extinguished from the factory. This saved considerable costs for lantern guards. 300 street lamps were still under construction. In 1982, the gas plant's technical facilities were worn out and barely usable efficiently. For this reason, the gas plant was shut down. Until 1990, the area was still used as a transfer station for coal trains. After that, the buildings were abandoned, since then, they disintegrate. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  12. History The works was built in 1913 and extended in 1954, to purify water from the Strines, Dale Dike and Agden reservoirs. In 1930 it had the first telephone installed in Bradfield and served well with the Yorkshire Water Authority taking over in in 1974. The UK’s water industry became privatised in 1989, the premises closed in 1994 following the completion of the new Water Treatment Works in the Loxley Valley. More recently Proposals to convert the derelict water filter works into housing have being held up by bats. A protected species survey has to be carried out in the summer (2014) before a decision can be taken on an application to turn the derelict building into 15 studio apartments. The scheme, which also involves adding five cottages in the grounds and using old ponds as a trout farm, off Mill Lee Road, has been withdrawn for the time being. It is due to be resubmitted to the Peak Park planning authority once the survey results are known. Read more at: https://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/news/environment/bats-delay-village-housing-scheme-in-low-bradfield-1-6525905 Explore Bit off the beaten track this one... that said the works is set in a picturesque village situated just outside Sheffield. The building is built from yorkshire stone and sits well in its surroundings albeit in its derelict state. The building is sat on large plot of land although the works itself is a little on the small side considering its past as a water works. The works consist of three rooms, one of those smaller to the rear of the building. Theres also a raised office area off one of the larger rooms and toilets at the opposite side. The building is in good condition to say it's been left for over twenty years with easy entry to the building. Theres lots of graffiti some of which are shown in the post... this said not all are represented here. Its definitely worth a visit and offers entry level explorers a great insight into urban exploring + theres a great pub just across the road offering a great local ale. Some pics Little lad absolutely loving it from above It's been a while since we explored speaking with others it has a full time security guard and some high end CCTV have also been installed
  13. This is a spectacular location for sure, surrounded by wonderful dramatic coastline. If you've got time I'd recommend bringing a packed lunch!! You could be watching the waves crash against the rugged cliffs, maybe if you're lucky you might spot a seal or a puffin passing by. Here in 1951 plans were set up to build a plant which would extract bromine from sea water and by adding sulphuric acid would then create liquid bromine. The bromine was then reacted with ethylene to produce Dibromoethane which was a key component of leaded petrol. With the phasing out of leaded petrol in the 1990's the plant diversified into other bromine chemicals. Production finally stopped altogether in March 2004. Many of the buildings have been demolished but there was enough standing to make this high on my wish list - plenty of natural decay and lots of interesting stuff left on site. Its been fairly undisturbed due to a combination of its remote location, CCTV and onsite security. Sadly though a recent fire has badly damaged one of the buildings (not quite sure which one). The photos in this report are a compilation. I had to make a return visit because the first time I somehow missed the conference room and the main attraction for me - the medical area. I really like how much variety there is, hence why there's quite a few pics
  14. Tower brick and tile company is a lovely little explore tucked away in the small village of Selborne. It's very isolated, with interruptions only from the occasional passing car and the swarming birds in the field opposite. The History The Brick and Tiles company have been producing hand made bricks at this site since 1872, with production finally ceasing on the 6th of November 2009 when the company went into administration. Since then there have been attempts to breathe life back into the brickworks, however all unsuccessfully. There were plans to turn the factory into a clean eco-friendly factory by using a anaerobic digester in order to generate the gas required to power the site. Unfortunately plans for this were refused in August of 2009. (Waste-to-energy plans at Selborne brickworks refused - BBC News) The Explore After attending a wedding, nothing was better to break up the niceties of suits, dresses and canapes then getting mucky and dusty on an good explore half way into the long drive home (It was pretty much on route anyway!). The weather was cloudy and slightly foggy, but it wasn't raining and it wasn't freezing so we had no complaints. Overall a pretty chilled explore with a surprising amount of equipment and machinery left and intact. As described by Mookster, this is very much a mini Clockhouse Brickworks, although getting in was far far easier. It's a shame we rushed round here a bit, as it's one of those places you could happy spend a few hours exploring. A small factory brimming with character and interesting relics of its former years. Pictures I did laugh at this The Kiln In here is the most impressive porn room I've seen so far. A big poster of how it used to look in its former days I assume? One of a few Drying ovens. Looks like a big chemical drum leaked onto the ground. Not sure exactly what it was, but I didn't really want to find out. I'm not really sure, but this looks like it could be a press used for forming the bricks/tiles.
  15. WOLVERTON WORKS - SEPTEMBER 2015 I cannot keep away from Wolverton and recently i clocked up my tenth visit since May 2014. To celebrate the occasion i got rather wet, but nothing could ever dampen my love of this classic train derp. Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 miles (180 km)-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line. The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. With the inevitable bouts of uncontrollable laughter brought about by the latest voyage subsiding, it was time to steady my machine for a few snaps. The tune 'Welcome to the jungle, it gets worse here everyday...' springs to mind: 1. 2. 3. 4. At this point i would like to say i have attempted to omit in my report the scrawls of pathetic graffiti tags, smashed windows, destroyed signs and train doors. All this damage has occurred in the last two months. A wanky 'tag' has even appeared on the long training school sign. This place stood untouched for decades slowly finding its way back to mother nature and now it is at the mercy of the local low life. 5. 6. 7. 8. This machine was still located on floor one back in May. Perhaps some of the local low life are underneath it . 9. Passage to the Foremans Office is getting to be a bit of a challenge . 10. 11. 12. A life time of ridicule. Spelling your name slightly differently will not help . 13. A first aid box would be useful here. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. That's all folks, hope you enjoyed
  16. Wolverton Works... A great location, explored with the usual great company of Session9, and a non-member. An early start again, and the usual monster breakfast washed down with some coco-pops, or vice versa, too damn early to remember. Without a doubt the funniest access and egress plan to date, I really wish I could mention it and share the photos but it would give away access information. Rosie and Jim were not impressed.... Some history, shamelessly stolen... Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 miles (180 km)-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line. The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. 1. 2. 3. Brew Time 4. 5. A few from the massive hanger-style workshops 6. This one involved a bit of dot-twitching climbing 7. 8. Lil old cart 9. Saw and Tool sharpening room 10. 11. 12. 13. Silver Eagle Disco with nice 5-digit phone number 14. 15. Mini Tractor area 16. Yeah whatever... 17. Rail News from 1988 18. 19. Udders and groovy drain pipe 20. The exit, and on to the second part of the comedy exfiltration... As always, thanks for looking and any feedback always appreciated ïÂÅ
  17. The Visit I was told about this place by some pensioner explorers who loved the street art around Sheffield, set off the week after to have a look for ourselves. Set in a lovely little village, not much left inside now but some amazing street art in there! The History The water works was built in 1913 to filter and treat water taken from the Dale Dike (the cause of the 1864 great flood of Sheffield),and Agden reservoirs in the nearby Loxley Valley. The water works was cutting edge technology in it's time and it even had the first telephone to be installed in Bradfield back in 1930 apparently. In 1974 the Yorkshire Water Authority took over and then during the Thatcher government some years later, the entire UK water industry was privatised with the Water Act of 1989. The pumping house at Lower Bradfield was abandoned in 1994 when a new pump house and processing plant was built Further down the Loxley valley. According to the locals the building attracts unwanted visitors and is a constant eyesore and a morbid reminder of Lower Bradfields grim past. The only small remaining hints of the buildings past Now some stripped out rooms.. And finally, some of the best street art I've ever seen... Oh.. and a fun looking pigeon
  18. This was the second stop of out Sunday trip. I have to say I do love a good bit of industrial filth. History - Originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The site employed around 115 people and was part of the Uniqema acquisition in 2006. In 2008, the business had a turnover of £45.3m and made a £2.1m operating profit. This was flattered by favourable glycerine pricing and the site made a loss in the final quarter of 2008 which has worsened into 2009, this poor performance eventually lead to the closure of the site.
  19. The Explore After visiting Lostock power station this was actually a really relaxed explore with lots of different types of building to look around, theres warehouses, offices, workshops and a huge industrial area at the back. The History Originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The site employed around 115 people and was part of the Uniqema acquisition in 2006. In 2008, the business had a turnover of £45.3m and made a £2.1m operating profit. This was flattered by favourable glycerine pricing and the site made a loss in the final quarter of 2008 which has worsened into 2009, this poor performance eventually lead to the closure of the site.
  20. Part 1. The opportunity arose to visit a friend of mine living in Beijing and it didn't take long for this place to crop up in conversation. He'd heard rumours of people being allowed to walk freely through the site before but this wasn't the case when he'd tried. Security had apparently been stepped up massively so we opted for a more sneaky approach. We made our entrance at the north end of the site where the 4 huge blast furnaces were situated. Once inside we found much more activity on site than we had expected; people on bicycles, people with dogs, cars driving around, parked cars, construction vehicles, it certainly hadn't been deserted by any stretch of the imagination and it was difficult for three of us to remain unseen for long. Many of the buildings were well sealed but we found our way inside a few of them. It's an amazing site, to think that we barely scratched the surface is just crazy. I would guess that we only covered about 5% of the whole site, if that. I've made a long report for this one as it's not somewhere you see every day, I hope you've got a spare 10 minutes to kill! History Shougang Company Ltd steelworks (also known as Capital Steel) began operations in 1919 as a small pig iron plant which eventually expanded to cover a 700 hectare area. It became the largest producer of steel in Northern China. At its peak there were 200,000 workers and an annual output of 10 million tons. The plant had its own apartment complexes, dining halls, schools, hospitals, public bathhouses, cinemas, temples, even a newspaper – Shougang Daily, which regaled readers with stories of steel output in its triumphalist headlines. For many years Shougang’s steel fed the capital’s economy, and virtually the entire district that surrounded the factory. In 2001, when Beijing was awarded the hosting rights for the 2008 Olympic Games, public concerns emerged about the level of Shougang's pollution, it's water usage (the mill required 50 million cubic meters of water annually to run), and their effect on quality of life in the area. A reputation as an industrial centre was no longer something to be proud of and by 2008 much of the plant had shut down. The city was undergoing refurbishment and industry was being moved out. On December 21st 2010, all production ceased and the state-owned company was officially relocated to Caofeidian, Hebei Province. Today works are being carried out to transform Shougang into the “Central Recreational District”. According to the plan, Shougang's old site will blend in with Beijing's urban development retaining many of the plant's original features to honour the legacy of Shougang's long lasting impact on the steel industry. A similar project was carried out in Beijing’s 798 art district with much success. Onto the pictures. 1. These were the first structures we came to, at the top of this road we could see diggers moving around so were already wary of being seen 2. 3. We got up to the silos but felt quite exposed so didn't hang around long 4. 5. We had a hunch there was somebody inside this building, not long later we bumped into a worker next to it who told us we shouldn't be here because there was a danger something might fall on our heads. He didn't seem that bothered though so we said goodbye and moved on. 6. 7. As we reached this empty pool we heard voices just a few metres away and had to hide. Luckily nobody came. 8. This building was situated right next to the pool. It didn't look like much from the outside but there were some nice control panels inside it. 9. 10. The blackboard in the corner had ‘Goodbye Shougang’ written on it 11. 12. 13. Back outside we headed across the undergrowth under a maze of conveyors, the blue one must be the longest I've ever seen. 14. Unfortunately we couldn't find a way inside the conveyors which was a shame as the blue one led straight up to the top of one of the blast furnaces. 15. This long red structure was some kind of train shed 16. As we were passing through it we spotted a man with two dogs outside so had to hide again 17. We started heading towards the larger structures, as we got close to this one we spotted two shiny vehicles parked underneath it so we turned back. 18. At this point all we could hear were lots of big dogs barking and it seemed to get louder the closer we got towards the blast furnaces. 19. It was becoming apparent how huge these furnaces were. 20. As we poked our heads around a corner we were able to take in the sheer size of these bad boys for the first time. Unfortunately there were two workers with dogs tied up in-between us and the furnace. We decided to approach them in case they might let us wander past without a care. They were very friendly but told us to head around the other side and not to try passing the dogs. Again they didn't seem all too bothered about us being there though so we felt a little more relaxed at this point. 21. The dogs weren't quite as friendly as their owners I should add. Look at that beast of a furnace though! By the way this was the smallest one out of the four. 22. 23. Around the other side the furnace was protected by barbed wire topped fences, we should have gone for it there and then but we continued further to look for an easier way in. 24. This way in looked pretty good 25. 26. However there were several vehicles milling about around here and within a few seconds we'd been busted by security. They weren't best happy with us to begin with but after offering them some cigarettes and my friend playing dumb to the fact we weren't allowed to be in there they chilled out a bit. 27. I took a couple of snaps of our surroundings before another vehicle arrived to escort us off site. 28. 29. We were driven the whole length of the site on our way out, it was absolutely huge, as big as a small town. 30. We also caught a glimpse of the larger blast furnaces which made me want to come back and see more.....
  21. I don't think this place has had widespread exposure even on American explore sites before, it's kind of in an area which is often overlooked as far as explores go with almost nobody local on the scene. Titchener's is a large iron works company still operational in upstate New York to this day, they make large scale metal items such as staircases, railings and ornamental architectural items. However they also had a factory which was responsible for pioneering the glued-together staples we know today, operational from 1880 to 2005 when it closed down. They not only made staples, their various wire products were used in cash registers, computers, hospitals, in clean room manufacturing areas, on equipment used by the US military and, most obscure of all, to hang chickens by their feet on automated plucking lines. Around a third of the factory has been demolished but the remaining sections have been left to rot and decay. It turned out to be a lot nicer inside than I thought it would be initially, and is quite an interesting place to photograph. After closure, a lot of the old staple-manufacturing machinery was donated to a technology museum as well as boxes of old records and catalogues found inside. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157657384615684
  22. Visited with @stranton And @ACID- REFLUX. Thx to them both for the great time had here. Anyways on with the report and pics History Inhospitable Inhospitable is a 700yd culvert which carries the moss brook beneath Collyhurst, the infall consists of a 15ft brick arch this changes too a10ft brick arch which continues towards the outfall which consists of a 7ft brick pipe built 8ft up in a retaining wall. Halfway through the culvert theres an overflow chamber with a manual operated penstock, once the flow gets too strong the penstock drops blocking the culvert this causes the brook too divert along the works something which seldon occurs. the Works the Works is a 700yd overflow which passes alongside and below Inhospitable, consists of a 10ft red and black brick pipe. This exits the overflow chamber by droping down 2 sets of steps the latter been steep, once at the bottom you are at least 70ft below the surface. Both the moss brook and the Works discharge too the Irk, (one of Manchesters 2 secondary waterways). Hope you all enjoy thx for looking..
  23. Having stumbled across a report from a couple years back and after a little bit of research later that evening me and Matt had a short drive over to Leeds to check out the "LOL drain" It's not that long but does have some nice bits and having only been in meanwood beck and the tunnels under roundhay park it was nice to see a place where you could admire the brickwork without scraping your head along the roof! Looking towards the River Aire Once you reach the end of the first tunnel you are greeted by this junction This bit did split off into a few separate smaller parts but after matt had a look in one and came back out feeling light-headed and feeling sick we quickly got out of that part Under the black gate things at the junction it opens up for a short while then back into a nice curved part Couple from the walk back out Cheers for looking
  24. Myself and Raz went down a cool drain in Leeds last night, read Raz's report here; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9536-Knostrop-treatment-works-outlet-Leeds-July-2015?p=79018#post79018 Press HD - Little walk about Video doesnt do the smell justice I have enough photos for a report but ill save them for the near future Nice little mooch about and thanks for looking
  25. Lately I have seem to have developed a real penchant for sprawling, rusty industrial stuff... So a visit to this one was LONG overdue! And ive not seen pipes quite as big as this since them big blue buggers at Pye!! An absolute must if youre into your 'Industrials'... ...Shoreham Cement Works... ... ... As always... Thanks for lookin' in!
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