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Albino-jay

UK Lord Line Hull Dec 2015

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Was out fishing over the weekend up in the ever so fabulous Hull. So thought I'd pop by whilst I was up there. Packed away early Sunday and decided to have a little wander with the camera. 
 
Didn't get into the building next to the lock as there were loads of people setting off Chinese lanterns and with anchor shaped wreaths and flowers etc so didn't want to disturb them
 
 
It's obviously been done many times so here's the history copied from @Robbo recent report. 
 
Some history

St. Andrew's Dock was originally designed for the coal trade but by the time it opened in 1883 it was earmarked solely for the use of the fishing industry which, with the development of steam powered trawlers and of the railway network, was undergoing a period of rapid expansion. The dock extension was opened in 1897. By the 1930s road transport was challenging rail and the last fish train ran in 1965. The last boom period in the industry was in the early 1970s, but by this time the fish market buildings on the north side of the dock were in need of repair. With the expansion of the freezer trawler fleet it was decided to move the fish docks to new buildings at Albert Dock in 1975 and St. Andrew's Dock was closed. This move unfortunately coincided with the declaration by Iceland of a 200 mile limit, the outbreak of the last Cod War, and a decline in the industry from which it has never recovered.

During the 1980s several factors led to changes in the use of land in the St. Andrews Dock and Dock extension areas, such as containerisation and the concentration of port activities in King George and Queen Elizabeth Docks to the east, the construction of Clive Sullivan Way as the major road into the city from the west and the sudden prominence that this gave to the western docks area, and the trend with increased car ownership towards out of town shopping and leisure uses previously concentrated in the City Centre. Filling of the dock itself began in the late 1980s.

The small dock-related industries located mainly on the south side of the dock either followed the fishing industry to Albert Dock or closed altogether, although a small nucleus of industries remained for some time at the eastern end of the dock, associated mainly with the ship-repair activities still taking place in William Wright Dock. As buildings become vacant they were quickly vandalised, tendering to encourage the remaining firms to move out.

As outlined above, the history of St. Andrew's Dock is very closely associated with the history of the deep-sea trawling industry, and as the dock itself began to disappear through the development of the site for retail and leisure uses, many Hull people felt that a part of their history was also disappearing, a history with which many of them had close family ties. A strong campaign was therefore launched to save something of the dock and its surroundings, both to explain to future generations what the industry was about and to preserve the memory of the many people who had sacrificed their lives to it
 
 
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more can be seen on my flickr
 
Edited by Albino-jay

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Hello mate, pretty cool report. Looks to have deteriorated since I went though.

 

 you might want to trim you bb codes, and if you highlight it all and click align centre it looks a bit tidier :thumb

 

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Nice pics matey

 

Well i was thinking it doesn"t look all that much different from 2 years ago ?.....hard to tell really it"s that trashed :)

 

Ironically it"s not doing too bad as it was supposed to have been demo"ed ages ago. Some FB group wanted to try & get them to preserve the main building? Bit too late for that after years of abuse & nobody is interested in the old Docks unless they get filled in & the Retail Park extended.

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Yeah i doubt much can be done with it now, in the main building the staircase that goes around the lift has collapsed at the top a d a few floors are getting a bit unstable now. 

 

And like you said unless the dock is filled in i cant see much happening. 

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