Jump to content
  • Similar Content

    • By Peterchen
      When Robert Montgomery showed his exhibition "All Palaces" in Berlin in 2012, probably few have expected how limited the time of the Stattbad will be and how right he should be with his light sculpture "All Palaces are Temporary Palaces". Four years later, the location, once known internationally for music, art and culture, has already been demolished.
       
      Designed by the architect Ludwig Hoffmann and inaugurated in 1907, the bathhouse was initially used by numerous factory workers in the area, as the tenements were then equipped without showers and bathtubs. There was a large pool for the men and a small one for the women. During the Second World War, the main building was badly damaged, but rebuilt in the 50s until the bathing operation was discontinued in 1999.
       
      After a short vacancy, the STATTBAD Wedding was reopened with the exhibition "No more sugar for the monkeys" and quickly gained a prestigious reputation. As an event location, the building attracted numerous artists through its preserved 60s aesthetic. On the upper floors there were permanently used ateliers, the two dry-laid pools were used for exhibitions, concerts and parties, the best known being the STATTNÄCHTE with its numerous well-known Djs.
       
      The photos shown here were taken in mid-May 2015, shortly after the closure due to a lack of building security measures. Jochen and his coworkers did not suspect that day that they had already left their last working day in this place behind. Meanwhile, only the curtain wall of the building remains, but new palaces are planned here, probably student apartments.
       
      More pictures of this huge location can be found here -> http://www.patrick-hertel.de/stattbad/
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Faith Roswell
      Have any of you missed a site: somewhere that was torn down, redeveloped or closed off just before you had the chance to visit and look around?
      I had a very quick look at this quarry but it was demolished just before I had planned to go back and climb stuff!
      Full report is here http://www.lifeoutthere.co.uk/2018/04/18/the-quarry-that-got-away/

      What was your "one that got away"?

       

    • By darbians
      Sadly this place is no more. One of my first explores last year, it may please some of you to see non processed images from myself too
      Here is abit of history from Geograph:
      The Norfolk Lunatic Asylum was situated in Yarmouth Road, Thorpe St Andrew near Norwich. The architects were Francis Stone and John Brown (Norfolk County Surveyors) and Robinson Cornish and Gaymer of North Walsham. The County Asylum was intended specifically for pauper lunatics and was only the second institution of its kind when completed in early 1814. The buildings were originally designed for the reception of 40 male patients in April 1814, followed by female patients in June of the same year. Roughly 70 patients were present on average in the early years. Extensions in 1831 and 1840 allowed this number to double and more substantial additions in the late 1850s as well as the construction of an auxiliary asylum, which was completed in 1881, some 700 inpatients could be accommodated. The auxiliary asylum or annexe is situated to the north of the main buildings, on the other side of Yarmouth Road, connected by a lane that was carried over the main road by a bridge. In April 1889 the institution was re-titled the Norfolk County Asylum, and after its modernisation into 'a hospital for mental disorders' (with reorganisation into distinct male and female asylums) there was room for more than 1,000 patients.
      To read it all look here:
      http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2255369
      Sorry no tripod So a few flash shots have been used!
      1
      2
      3
      4
      5
      6
      7
      8
      9
      10
      11
      12
      13
      14
      15
      16
      17 Hope you enjoyed thanks for having a look.
    • By darbians
      This is the newer of the buildings on this site. Only the foundations of the original building remain after it was burnt down shortly after this building was completed. Sadly there is planning for it to be demolished and rebuilt the planning has changed recently to a smaller building due to lack of interest. How ever I have recently learned a full restoration progress is being taken on.
      I have also seen images of a dancing bear which was a popular attraction back in the day.
      My first explore with company. A good job as I would not of got in like the others who have gone recently. Through sheer determination of the lady that went with me we found a way in. Yes we did get stung a lot!
      This is an amazing place but really is in a bad state.
      Big thanks to Zee!!!!!!
      Ground floor






      First floor


      Second floor






      A Bed Of Light by darbians, on Flickr
    • By Andy
      The company was founded as a straw-paper mill in 1859. After the sale in 1873, the production were extended in 1880. The houses for the workers emerged 1912. After the Second World War worked more than 300 employees in the paper mill. Each year, 15 to 20 papermakers were trained.
      Jobs were lost in 2001, last 115 employees still working in the factory. Finally it was closed in 2007 and demolished in 2011.
      The photos were taken during an eight-hour exploration five years ago, in April of 2010.
      Sorry for the many photos. But I wanted to show more, because it doesn't exist anymore.
      south plant - part one
      1

      2

      3

      4

      5

      6

      7

      8

      9

      10

      11

      12

      13

      14

      15

      16

      17

      18

      19

      20

      21

      22

      23

      24

      25

      26

      27

      28

      29

×