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The Amateur Wanderer

UK Ushaw Seminary Complex 2014 - 2015

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Ushaw Seminary 2014 -2015

 

Introduction:

 

I was hoping I'd be able to get my first report up on here sooner than this, but I've been busier than anticipated!

 

Here it goes then...

 

A compilation of images from Ushaw Seminary - A place that I've covered extensively during the past couple of years. Most of the images that you're about to see can already be found

scattered through various reports of 28DL but this will be the first time in which a few of my favourites from each location will be compiled to make a complete Ushaw Report.

 

History:

 

I'll be adding more information and history as relevant as we go, but here's a brief overview of the sites history, one I'm sure most of us are familiar with regarding the much derped junior seminary.

 

Wikipedia: "In 1804 Bishop William Gibson began to build at Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham. These buildings, designed by James Taylor, were opened as St Cuthbert's College in 1808. There was a steady expansion during the nineteenth century with new buildings put up to cater for the expanding number of clerical and secular students. In 1847, the newly built chapel, designed by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin was opened. This was followed by the Big Library and Exhibition Hall designed by Joseph Hansom, 1849-1851. The Junior House, designed by the distinguished architect, Peter Paul Pugin, was added in 1859. St Cuthbert’s Chapel, designed by Dunn and Hansom, was opened in 1884, replacing an earlier one by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, which the seminary had then outgrown. The Refectory was designed and built by E. W. Pugin. The final development came in the early 1960s with the opening of a new East wing, providing additional classrooms and single bedrooms for 75 students. The main college buildings are grade II listed, however the College Chapel is grade II* and the Chapel of St Michael is grade I.”
 

Junior Seminary & Chapel 2014:

 

The bit we've all seen, countless times... Well, here it is again... (This report will get more interesting, honest!)

 

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Alright, lets get out of this sh!thole!

 

The Barn:

 

The barn, explored in early 2015, this part of the seminary is neglected by most, I'm not too sure why either, it has quite a nice feel to it I felt...

 

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Wouldn't be a Barn without animals would it :D 

 

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The Pool:

 

A new find by myself and BoroLad at the time back in 2014, me been the first down the rope! Was quite amusing trying to find a way into whilst dancing about on the seminary rooftop!

 

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Canon AT-1 Film Camera Taken on Ilford XP2 Film

 

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The Live Building:

 

This was an interesting one, managing to creep in during a meeting, just months later the building would be opened to public tours anyway ffs!

 

Ahhh well, least we had the fun of getting round undetected...

 

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And that's all from here! I have plenty more pics as you can imagine, but that's the base of the complex covered.

 

Thanks for reading!

TAW :) 

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46 minutes ago, The Amateur Wanderer said:

Just realised I've posted this in Industrial Sites, my bad, was going to do a Pilkington's report and changed my mind, forgetting to change the post!

 

Just moved it for you :)

 

We were going to have a look at the farm area after the seminary last year but by the time we came out there were farmers going in and out of the barn next door moving slurry and other smelly stuff so we didn't fancy it!

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Bloody hell! Like that a lot! Lots of areas i haven't seen before, usually it's lots of pictures of derp! Well done one the livey part too :thumb

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looking back at my old pics from here I can see how the corridors from the Seminary are reminiscent of your pic 3 from the live section. Beautiful building. I visited here early 2015, we found the pool but no entry. The rope sounds interesting lol. Nicely put together. The chapel is lovely too. It was sealed when I went :thumb really nice shots :)

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