Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The small funeral chapel was an accidental find. The chapel is located a bit seclusively in an area which is off the beaten track anyway. But the area around it appears to be pretty neat. The chapel hardly catches anybody´s  eyes. Only the exact observer will spot it. That might be the reason why the shmall church is still in a pretty good condition. 

You´ll approach and explore a very peaceful place. A metall door, that leads into the cellar, is half-open. You can´t see anything but darkness. I walk by the door and enter the chapel from behind through an open door. As soon as I had entered the chapel, It appeared to me that this place wasn´t an ordinary chapel. It was obviously used as a funeral chapel. The first room you´ll enter is a tiled room, which was apparently used for washing and preparing the bodies before burial. After that you´ll reach the actual chapel. which was used for funeral ceremonies. An old, red carpet is still lying around and a big cross is still painted on the wall. In the attic you´ll find the former staff rooms. 

While my fellow-urbexers were taking their photos in the chapel, I remembered the door leading into the cellar. So I went to explore the cellar on my own. Cellars have never been my favorite place but after knowing about the purpose of this chapel it definitely didn´t help to feel better. I had barely squeezed through the door when I saw the construction on the stairs, which was obviously used for the transportation of the bodies up and down the stairs. Someone had placed a broken cruzifix on it.  I went down the stairs following them into the pitch-dark cellar. I was right in the middle of the former morgue of the chapel. An old apron was hanging on the door, a wooden cross leaning against the wall. Even old utensils for preparing the bodies. In a side room was the former cooling room with the mortuary refrigerator (tightly closed). In the next small room you could find old coffin lids.  My eyes became gradually adjusted to the darkness, which let the place appear less scary. 

When my friends started to capture the cellar, I waited on an old stone bench. It was a wonderfull autumn´s day. I really felt the tranquility of this place. If these walls could talk, this place could tell many stories of grief and goodbyes. Yet, the peacefulness and the location of this place even comforted me. Such a nice place to say good-bye. 

DSC_0213.JPG.5130777c71bc0af48d207cb4da27cef8.JPG

DSC_3813.JPG.9728300093175dead0009d36a02c3728.JPG

DSC_3814.JPG.86299daf518be10de5935f361108b62b.JPG

DSC_3823-Bearbeitet.JPG.e0827e38dcd7025a3a669fc283571b90.JPG

DSC_0199.JPG.749ab894a852be85a1371f9c56d9f0c0.JPG

DSC_0210.JPG.75c0cf41ca58dd5426052e8395ee9d0b.JPG

DSC_3805.JPG.ef83e0684065c1a4b2eb8ed393d5e7a2.JPG

DSC_0206.JPG.330db1e9285f966ddc22d52da949d9f1.JPG
 

Edited by franconiangirl
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, this place is right up my street. The write up had me reading all of it for a start then the first picture WOW. It looks amazing, the brickwork, the tables, the history. You have done a great job in capturing it :) Thanks for sharing :thumb 

 

:comp: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By urbexdevil
      Being a regular at the Nurburgring and this place being brought to my attention by a non explorer, the perfect opportunity after a day of storms arose!
       
      Putting this one off all week with temperatures reaching the 30s, the moment came on a somewhat stormy day to check this place out, taking full advantage of the slightly cooler – yet humid air.
       
      My first explore out of the UK too which made for something special, despite being a derp it was still something different and unique for myself in comparison to the UK.
       
      There’s not much left of the place and the history is scarce, however it looks as though work began rebuilding the place but the cost of development was a spanner in the works.
       
      The basement also contained a septic tank which is no longer allowed in the region, combining that with the nearest sewer being some distance away making development even more expensive.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Light-worx
      An abandoned beacon in the baltic sea. There are two of it. One 1000m and the other one in 4000m distance from the runway.
      Ther were used to enlarge the range of the runway ...so the pilots could navigate easier to the short runway.
       
      Build and used by the NVA. The army of the former GDR... (DDR).




























    • By Andy
      Only a few quick shots, taken without a tripod.
      I don't know when the chapel (called "Capel Zinc") was built, it was a subsidiary tabernacle for the now Holy Trinity Church in Corris.
      Chairs has been removed and apparently the property is now used by a flower grower.
      Visited with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
       
    • By teddybear
      This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany.
      This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown.
      The  only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites.
       
      IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
    • By The_Raw
      Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed.

      The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom.

      The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair.
       
      One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope.
       
      1.

       
      2.

       
      3.

       
      4.

       
      5.

       
      6.

       
      7.

       
      8.

       
      9.

       
      10.

       
      11.

       
      12.

       
      Diolch am edrych eto
       
×