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Vulex

UK St Joseph's College, April 16

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St Joseph's gets visited/reported on a lot, some people even look down upon others for going. But I absolutely love this place. This hobby for me started with it in late july last year. I was looking for something to drive too locally and found a picture randomly on google. So I drove and when I saw it for the first time I was in love. But after walking around I chickened out in entering... I first entered in August and after looking at my first report I posted from there I cringed. 
This was my 4th trip back and first as a guide. I wanted to try and capture the things people dont really post or the not so obvious angles/pictures (I might of tried a bit to hard ;)). But every time I visit, I see something new. 

 

Visited with @CuriousityKilledTheCat and a Non-member.  A really fun explore as I wasnt concentrating on my camera and more looking around. Also turning around and seeing Secca stood looking at me was funny. He is a sound guy!

 

Shot with my D3300 and my trusty 35mm lens.

 

History

 

St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool.

The first Junior Seminary of the Diocese was founded at St Edward's College in 1842 as a Catholic 'classical and commercial school' under the direction of the secular clergy and was established in Domingo House, a mansion in Everton. Its President for the next forty years was to be Monsignor Provost John Henry Fisher. When the junior seminarians moved to St Joseph's in 1920 the school was taken over by the Christian Brothers and continues to this day and now serves as the Liverpool Cathedral Choir School. In recognition of the heritage owed to St Edward's College one of the two chapels at Upholland was consecrated as the St Edward the Confessor Chapel.

Although Upholland flourished until the 1960s, the rapidly changing social climate in that decade led to a sharp drop in enrolment. In the early 1970s, the northern bishops decided to consolidate the activities of Upholland and Ushaw; from 1972 all junior seminarians in the north attended Upholland, and from 1975 all senior seminarians attended Ushaw.[3] Even as the sole junior seminary for the north of England, however, Upholland continued to suffer a decline in enrolment, and by the 1980s was no longer a traditional seminary but a "boarding school for boys considering a vocation". In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992.

 

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Edited by Vulex

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Very interesting shots there mate.im sure one of those is where you banged your head lol you can laugh about that now. Remember when you had the blood running down your head, good times :-D

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4 hours ago, Lavino said:

Very interesting shots there mate.im sure one of those is where you banged your head lol you can laugh about that now. Remember when you had the blood running down your head, good times :-D

Yea mate it was, the bit from taxidermy to the Library. Im not going to lie, i was very scared as the blood trickled down my head.

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