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UK The Nuba Survival, Checkendon April 2016

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I don't really know the best way to introduce this, it's certainly an enigma with an interesting back story.

 

The Nuba Survival (often mistakenly called The Nuba Embrace) is a sculpture by John Buckley beside a very derelict barn in a field in rural Oxfordshire.

 

This sculpture appeared by Copyhold Barn, Checkendon. John Buckley created the sculpture on his return from a visit to the Nuba Mountains in central Sudan in 2000- 2001 where he was a guest of the Nuba Rehabilitation, Relief and Development Organisation (N.R.R.D.O.) during the time of the genocide. He witnessed first hand a mass attempt to wipe out a cultural identity through ethnic cleansing, slavery and fierce attacks on the traditional homelands.

 

Whilst the sculpture itself isn't 'abandoned' as such, it's a very peculiar place to be sited. And the falling down barn is pretty cool as well with it's multitude of boats under the collapsing roof.

 

The weather was dreadful, I want to go back in the height of summer when it's not raining too much.

 

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Thanks for looking :wink:

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Really like the sculpture but what a strange location for it to be in?? Would love to know why it was placed there.

The little place reminds me of a run down shack. Nice :thumb 

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