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Vulex

UK Château Miranda, Belgium, July 2016

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The Second destination on my latest Euro trip of Belgium, concentrating on some of the more popular and well known derps in the country. A trip plagued with exhaustion, illness and one of the nicest all you can eat restaurants (unlimited steak, to fry your self.) 

The rain did not give up all morning and at the prospect of adding wet and cold (to their symptions of tiredness and sickness)  due to the walk up to the Castle 2/4 of the party decided to try and sleep. 
Up until seeing pictures of Miranda I wasnt really bothered about going abroad to explore, but chance seeing pictures on facebook in February really opened my eyes. And made me want to get over there. 

On the 3 previous trips I have lobbied for a stop here, but up until now it wasnt on route. Even though its trashed and vandalised, she is still a beaut and worth the trip. Even just for a glimpse of the external. A real life Princess in the tower castle. Unfortunately by the time I got there, there was nobody left to save. 

 

History
 

The castle was built in 1866 by the English architect Edward Milner under commission from the Liedekerke-De Beaufort family, who had left their previous home, Vêves Castle, during the French Revolution. However, Milner died before the castle was finished. Construction was completed in 1907 after the clock tower was erected.

Their descendants remained in occupation until World War II. A portion of the Battle of the Bulge took place on the property, and it was during that time, the castle was occupied by the Nazis.

In 1950, Miranda Castle was renamed "Château de Noisy" when it was taken over by the National Railway Company of Belgium (NMBS/SNCB) as an orphanage and also a holiday camp for sickly children. It lasted as a children's camp until the late 1970s.

 

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Took me forever to persuade anyone to go and see this as it's so out of the way, well worth the trip in my opinion despite being a shadow of it's former self. Great pics, number 5 is a winner :thumb 

 

:comp: 

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Really nice to see this again, and that bathroom. I hear very few venture across the exposed beams to get that shot. 

Beautiful puctures, the first is very imposing. I love 5 too :) 

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Looks awesome mate, great shots :thumb If this is the place that got you on the Euro trips i'm glad you have got to see it.

Really like the mists coming out of the woods :)

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@The_Raw Totally agree with you, really worth the trek, imagine this place in the snow! 

 

5 hours ago, Urbexbandoned said:

Really nice to see this again, and that bathroom. I hear very few venture across the exposed beams to get that shot. 

Beautiful puctures, the first is very imposing. I love 5 too :) 


It is a bit of a walk of death i'll admit hah lol

 

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@The_Raw Totally agree with you, really worth the trek, imagine this place in the snow! 

 

On 03/08/2016 at 1:04 PM, Urbexbandoned said:

Really nice to see this again, and that bathroom. I hear very few venture across the exposed beams to get that shot. 

Beautiful puctures, the first is very imposing. I love 5 too :) 


It is a bit of a walk of death i'll admit hah lol

 

23 hours ago, Ferox said:

Looks awesome mate, great shots :thumb If this is the place that got you on the Euro trips i'm glad you have got to see it.

Really like the mists coming out of the woods :)

 Thanks buddy :)

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