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Gromr123

UK Staplefield Patrol Operational Base - West Sussex - September 2016

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History

During WW2 a British resistance unit was created, named the 'Auxiliary Patrol'. These were a sort of top secret elite Home Guard that were given the most modern weapons and equipment. Each member of the 'Auxiliary Patrol' were taken from the Home Guard, Vetted and made to sign the official secrets act. This highly secret unit had there own underground hideout for in the event that Britain was invaded. 

Each hideout was fitted with bunk beds and could sleep up to 8 people. 


The Explore

When they built this, they intended for it to be well hidden. I have to commend them, they did a mighty good job. I spent the best part of an hour wandering aimlessly round woods around a vague marker I put on google maps from SUBBRIT. Eventually I found it with bit of luck and some extra location clues I found online. The SUBBRIT location was actually a little off as it turned out.

The underground hideout has two entrances. One is down via a square shaft that requires a ladder to get down. The second way in is via the 'Emergency exit tunnel' which is a concrete tunnel that is roughly a meter in diameter and comes out on the banks of an old pond. 

I actually found the emergency tunnel first, so decided get in touch with my Andy Dufresne side and crawl down it. It was actually no-where near as claustrophobic as it looked as you can sit up and turn around in it quite easily, but it is about 20-30m long.

The bunk beds are all still there, but very rotten. The floor is covered in damp mud but everything else is in very good condition considering its age.

When I was heading out I went to find the other entrance, which I must have walked right by the first time. It was covered by a couple corrugated steel sheets.  

Overall, a decent little explore :D

 

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Always wanted to see one of these the history to them is pretty interesting Churchill never acknowledged they existed did he? Saboteurs :P               Cool report mate :)

Edited by -Raz-

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They call these zero stations. There's one at Hollingbourne near to where I live, although this one seems to be in better condition. 

 

Nicely photgraphed :) 

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