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    • By Dubbed Navigator
      Not seen this one about, so why not!
       

       

       
       

       
    • By Stussy
      Hello, another from my long long long list of shitty cottages I have to post up on here tp convert you to the deeply weird realm of cottaging!

      Found this almost my accident whilst exploring with a couple friends, after walking what felt like miles through small forests, over streams, up and down heather marsh lands and over several feilds to visit some of the shittest derps you could probably imagine, I spotted this on the way down the wild hills.  We took a chance as it was on a live farm, found the door open and decided to pop in for 30 mins and grabbed some pics.  We all felt a bit uneasy as it was a live farm and decided to get out quickly, just as we were closing the door a car came down the drive way, and we bolted like a mini heard of highland cows stampeding our way down the side of the house and over a few fences to safety.  Never been back, but one day I will!


       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for cuming cottaging with me
    • By Zen1991
      So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there.
       
      After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. 
       
      Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe.
       
      I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for reading:) 
    • By Mikeymutt
      Whilst out early to get some snaps of the Norfolk broads I was travelling home and the sun was still low and frost glistening.so I took a diversion to see this small collection of vehicles.hid from sight in a clump of trees there is a small rselection here.my favourite being the series one landie..been waiting for this time of year to visit here for the overgrowth to die back.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
       
       
    • By hamtagger
      Loxley Chapel
       
      The Explore
       
      Last few minutes of daylight left after a long day in Sheffield with @Urbexbandoned. If you've looked at my last report you would've read that my camera died for no reason at the previous location so I gathered my teddies from the floor beside my cot and headed towards this little derp-hole, armed only with an iPhone 6 and a diminishing sense of humour. The local scrote-muffin cock-knocker youths have went to town on this place. House of God? Fuck that, lets smash the place up. Sleep tight everyone and rest assured that these little dicks are the future of the U.K.
       
      The History (Stolen as always)
       
      The Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves (the then curate of Bradfield) together with some of his associates. Shortly after its completion consecration was refused because builders would, for some unknown reason, not install an east-facing window. It was eventually sold at auction for the princely sum of £315 and so became an independent chapel. A decade later it started performing baptisms in 1799 and the first officer of the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was apparently christened here. Notably a significant number of the 240 dead from the Great Sheffield Flood of 1864 are buried in the cemetery. This includes members the Armitage family, who tragically lost 12 of their number, including five children. Here's what the chapel looked like in the later 1800's
       
      The Pictures
       
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      Extract from a local rag..
      “I can’t help but feel that this is a shocking state of affairs being a microcosm of much which is wrong with our society. Here lay our dead.
      Sheffield people laid to rest in originally quite beautiful surroundings but now ignored and forgotten. How did this come about?”
       
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      Shot on my phone Lewis style  
       
      Thanks for wasting your vision  
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