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    • By Himeiji
      I want to tell a funny story that happened recently in Luxembourg city.
      We decided to climb a crane. When we were at the top, someone spotted us and apparently called police, but we left before they arrived. 
      What happened further. We cleaned our clothes, and after a while decided to go home, but we were too lazy to walk around the district and just passed by the construction site again. I noticed a police car next to the entrance. While driving away, they saw us, stopped and started asking:
      - Were that you who just climbed a crane here?
      - No. That's not us.
      - Are you sure?
      - Yes, we are. 
       
      After that they let us go)))
      I'd like to write a positive feedback on the work of our police, really) 


    • By jane doe
      Snowdown was the deepest colliery in Kent reaching well over 3,000 ft (915 metres). It was also the hottest and most humid pit in Kent and was given the name 'Dante's Inferno' by the miners. Regarded by many as the worst pit to work at in Britain, most Snowdown miners worked naked because clothes became too uncomfortable. The miners could consume around 24 pints (14 lires) of water in an 8-hour shift. There were frequent cases of heat stroke.

      Snowdown closed in 1987










    • By jane doe
      Established in 1926, G.L. Murphy was a family run business and supplied bespoke machinery to the tanning industry, as well as building rag cutting and cable stripping machinery.  The company also provide refurbishment and renovation works for various machinery types. 












    • By crabb
      What's left of the south marston hotel, remains an empty, scorched shell. Not much to see on this one, and I am way to late but hey, it still provides an eerie vibe. And the photos came out pretty good too. Thanks,
      C









    • By jane doe
      Predannack opened in 1941 as an RAF base, but today is the satellite airfield to RNAS Culdrose - it is a restricted MOD site and an active airfield used daily for flying training and also provides our Fire Fighting training facility. The area is heavily utilised by Culdrose helicopter squadrons, light fixed wing aircraft and, on an occasional basis by other aircraft types including jet aircraft, for a variety of reasons. Predominantly crews are involved in intensive training sorties involving a high cockpit workload. On average there is in excess of 2000 aircraft moves a month at the unit. The airfield is also used by the Fire Training School for live fire fighting and rescue instruction/exercises and there is also a rifle range at Predannack which is frequently used for live weapon firings. Additionally the airfield is used for a variety of additional tasks when the Control Tower is unmanned e.g. gliding.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
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