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xclementx

Haus Des Pfarrers, behind the mystery !

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Maybe you remember about this villa (2013 - 2014) in Belgium. I'm pretty sure you saw pics with the "skeleton skull".

 

5c6d61_8ca428e2263963f36f2de631ddea58c9.

(Source : http://www.spiritofdecay.com)

 

Ok, so the place is pretty messy When we visited it. The neightborhood was very suspicious about urbexers. I barely knew the context of this house and the stories behind. To be honest, it was the most unpleasant visit ever.

 

The facts :
- He was a priest or something like that.

- There is a lot of pictures of young boys everywhere on the floor (SFW :   http://eluna-side.weebly.com/uploads/1/0/5/7/10571795/8974664_orig.jpg)
- There is a loooot of toys. PICTURE BY ELUNA-SIDE

- The people say that the priest was friend with some "famous" pedophiles in Belgium.

 

Testimonials :

"I'm used to write a text that summarizes a bit the situation of my photos. Here for once I'll make an exception. There is a lot to say with what we saw on this place (not photographed) and to discuss, but out of respect for this occupant deceased in 2010 I can say nothing." http://eluna-side.weebly.com/haus-des-pfarrers-be.html

"At the sight of the fully-fledged play areas, the many German writings, the pictures from all over the world (at the time of the visit there were about 500 ~ slides on site), the innumerable mattresses and the other, strange compositions Picture of this place. Was it a meeting place? A radically Catholic cult of sects? There is also some evidence, including the one or other slogans against Islam, or other world religions (as well as the war reserves of powdery potatoes). Just as surprising were the pictures of young men in short jeans pants, or even swimwear. Catholic priest in Belgium. Jupp. 10 Eur in the clichés...
Rarely do I feel as uncomfortable as there."  (Google traduction) - http://www.drull.net/?p=1618


So, someone has visited this place ? Or maybe you know the story behind that ?
Maybe someone who speak german can help me with that ?

 

Thanks for reading.

Edited by xclementx

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I'm from Germany. I've never visited this place and I know nothing about it's history; so I can't assess, what is true and what is conjecture. 

 

The text from the drull.net - website is quite long. Unfortunately I miss the time to translate it completely.

Mostly he writes about his own bad experiences with the Church in the past. Then he describes the condition inside the house.

Finally, he notes that many things were stolen (also the skull) and many things has been re-decorated by visitors and photographers.

In the text are no historical facts, only a few assumptions.

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10 hours ago, Andy said:

I'm from Germany. I've never visited this place and I know nothing about it's history; so I can't assess, what is true and what is conjecture. 

 

The text from the drull.net - website is quite long. Unfortunately I miss the time to translate it completely.

Mostly he writes about his own bad experiences with the Church in the past. Then he describes the condition inside the house.

Finally, he notes that many things were stolen (also the skull) and many things has been re-decorated by visitors and photographers.

In the text are no historical facts, only a few assumptions.


Thanks a lot Andy :) I'm waiting for other people...

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