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Vulex

UK Wellington Rooms, Liverpool November 16

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Irish Tour

 

When weekend plans get cancelled last minute, might as well go out on the derp to a nice local.

Hanging a bit from the night earlier, we ventured to Liverpool to photograph this beautiful ballroom.

With it being so dark in parts of the building and mirrors on the wall, it presented a good opportunity to try out Bulb mode on my camera instead of light painting, so a few of these shots were taken with the sensor exposed for 3-5 mins. 
It made Lining up shots a ball ache.

 

Visted with @The Man In Black

 

Shot with Nikon D3300 and a 11-16mm Tokina Lens

 

History

 

The building was designed by the architect Edmund Aikin and built between 1815–1816 as a subscription assembly room for the Wellington Club. It was originally used by high society for dance balls and parties.

Neo-classical in style the building's façade is Grade II* listed, but it is now blackened and the building is derelict, a reflection on the changing wealth and fashions in the city. As the Irish centre it was a popular clubbing venue (1997), renowned for its excellent Guinness, pictures of the Everton and Irish football teams, high ceilings and period decor in the main hall. A petition was organised to prevent the building's closure, but this was ultimately unsuccessful.

 

 

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Thank you for looking.

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3 minutes ago, jones-y-gog said:

That's a fucking gem you've found right there. Love that faded grandeur and well captured man. 

:D its a beautiful and thanks pal :) 

 

@Andy Thank you mate :) 

Edited by Vulex

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This is awesome! Fantastic shots of a fantastic looking place. 

 

I do wonder why in the hell there is a bar there named after an American president though.

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On 20/11/2016 at 3:51 AM, Sheavy said:

This is awesome! Fantastic shots of a fantastic looking place. 

 

I do wonder why in the hell there is a bar there named after an American president though.

I think its because JFK married a Irish girl and his parents were Irish, so there was some strong roots. 

@Lavino Glad somebody got the reference ;) and I hope youve got that album in your collection.

 

@Urbexbandoned Cheers :D 

Thank you @The_Raw

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Really nice that m8ty. and lovely pics you got. Deffo worth the explore. thanks for report. Can't wait to get through the shit at home and get back out. Good stuff m8ty.

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