Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
mookster

UK Battle Hospital Incinerator & Laundry, Reading Dec 2016

Recommended Posts

Battle Hospital in Reading closed it's doors in 2005 and was subsequently demolished, sitting on the land now is a large Tesco supermarket and new housing estate. However not included in the sale or development plans were the service areas such as the industrial laundry, incinerator, ambulance service building and a few others. These have sat derelict ever since with only part of that area being used to store ambulances and one smaller building is an operational NHS laboratory.

 

Me and my friend decided to give it a look on a day of trying out new places and all seemed well, for about ten minutes. As soon as we got into the incinerator building I noticed the obvious signs of a squatter in residence (including very fresh human excrement on the floor... :shock:) so we were already on our guard. Soon after that we heard somebody else enter the building whilst we were out of sight at the other end and, after hearing them walk around making noise decided the best course of action was to avoid any possible confrontation entirely and leave via a small hole in the side of the building. We then poked around the empty laundry building and on the way out noticed a door that had been closed a few minutes earlier was now open. After that we cut our losses and left, which is a shame as the incinerator building is very cool and I would have loved to have spent more time there were it not for our interruption.

 

31206154560_9dff0fc0c6_b.jpg

 

31206165180_bd6efaa322_b.jpg

 

31431853012_a2dd7cf4d3_b.jpg

 

30768507083_efb90292d8_b.jpg

 

31431849012_3bfac7ea72_b.jpg

 

31540481576_1ee74412ca_b.jpg

 

31206168160_30be8a7595_b.jpg

 

31578236165_0d8976231a_b.jpg

 

31462456401_c492d16900_b.jpg

 

Thanks for looking :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By crabb
      After hearing about the permanent closure of this well known super store giant, we felt like a part of our childhood was gone forever.
      In the store we visited, we found the names of those loyal workers written on the wall with one of those people having  worked there for 20 years,
      but unfortunately we couldn't go back and get a photo due to my camera running out of juice.
      But all is not lost as there is a full video on my friend's youtube channel so check it out!
      https://www.youtube.com/user/Kirbsvids
      Here are the best photos we managed to get, thanks for looking.
      C















    • By jane doe
      Unfortunatly  the Glen o dee hospital was pretty trashed , a few nice little bits  





    • By jane doe
      Another old explore ...a little gem in Kent   








    • By jane doe
      Brick production at the Clock House Brickworks dates back to 1933 when the Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded to exploit a rich seam of Weald Clay that had been discovered.  By 1941 the original company entered into liquidation due to the war effort and the lack of need for the hollow-block ceramics they were producing. A share of the company was sold to the London Brick Company, who in 1945 eventually purchased the company to avoid a full closure.  Production was vastly increased, in part to the housing boom of the 50’s, and during the 60’s the site was rebuilt to cope with the increased demand.  The London Brick Company was acquired by Hanson PLC in the 1980’s and the works was refitted. In 1998, Clockhouse Bricks were used by three major exhibitors in that year’s Ideal Home Show and in 2000, Clock House was said to be Hanson Brick’s main soft mud production site, producing around 42 million bricks per year








×