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UK Vandicourt Quarry, Micklefield - January 2017

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Vandicourt Quarry is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). The rocks here are limestones which were formed in a shallow tropical sea, known as the Zechstein Sea, about 255 million years ago during the Permian Period. The Zechstein Sea extended from eastern England across northern Europe. 

 

During the second world war the tunnels beneath the quarry were used by local people as air raid shelters.

 

 

I came across this place a fair few months ago with @Fatpanda after heading over to see his new house i noticed a quarry from the side of the road so off we headed to see what was there, and to our amazement we actually found a tunnel at the base of the limestone cliff which led to a rather small set of tunnels which were filled with lots of rusty old bike wheels, and some other rusty items. There was a few old newspapers too but they were in a fairly bad state so I couldn't make out the dates :( There is evidence that local yobbos use the place drinking venue too :D

 

 

Sorry if some of the shots seem a little overexposed but I found it pretty hard to take photos in here for some reason!

 

 

 

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Thanks for looking

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That's a really nice find. Always gratifying, to discover something like that unexpectedly.

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59 minutes ago, Andy said:

That's a really nice find. Always gratifying, to discover something like that unexpectedly.

Thanks Andy, it is a good feeling finding a new place and makes it much more interesting exploring not knowing what you will find! 

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