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France Hospital Plaza - France - April 2017

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A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. 

 

 

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Thanks for looking!

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The church looks very nice, but also very clean. I like more the rooms with the peeled paint and wallpapers, as well as the corridor with the light that passes through the windows on the floor.

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  • Similar Content

    • By AndyK!
      I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it.
       
      A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly.
       

       
      History
       
      The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel.
       
      In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished.
       

      The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use
       
      One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region.
       
      Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year.
       
      Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless.
       
      Bureau Central
       
      Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire.
       

      Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh?


      The interior has seen better days


       

      Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors


       

       


      The Blast Furnaces


      Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952


      Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard


      Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces


      Base of one of the blast furnaces


      Inside a blast furnace building


      Inside another blast furnace building


      Spiral staircase


      Exterior with the water tower in the distance


      View up a blast furnace


      Wagons under a blast furnace


      The blast furnace control room had been modernised
       
      Turbo Blower House and Workshops
       
      The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s.


      Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2


      There was one blower set for each blast furnace


      Side view of the huge blowers


      Turbo-fan 3


      The green motor for fan 3


      Historic control panel from when older machines were used


      The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago


      Newer control room for the turbo-blowers


      Turbo-blower control room


      Workshop area


      Workshops


      Locker room
       
      Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area
       
      The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks.


      Wagons parked in the delivery station


      Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind


      Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks


      Blast furnace and wagons


      Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below

      Steel works
       
      The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel.


      Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952


      Sign in the steelworks


      View along one of the many long sections


      View down the steelworks


      View in the opposite direction


      Work area between machinery


      Ladles lined up in the ladle bay


      One of the ladles tipped up


      Wider view of the ladles


      One of the work bays


      Another work bay


      Crane lowered in one of the bays


      Furnaces for melting iron and scrap


      Track for moving ladles


      Electromagnetic lifting gear
       
      Rolling Mill
       
      The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms.


      Plant in the rolling mill


      Plant in the rolling mill


      Lifting gear in the mill


      Crane hooks in the mill


      Tracks leading to mill equipment


      Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
    • By jakeurbexphotography
      On the outskirts of Fishburn lies the derelict Winterton hospital. Winterton hospital used to be very big however most of its buildings were demolished and this part is the only building that remains of it. All of the windows are boarded up however when we got there it looked like someone had pulled the entire doorway off causing the whole thing to open making an entry so easy. Inside the building is in terrible condition, (similar to St. peter's) with collapsed floors, wallpaper peeling, water damage etc. We also didn't realise at the time that the building had asbestos but luckily we had masks so make sure to bring one if you're planning on going inside. We were unable to access the top floor due to the floor being so bad so we only got photos from the corridor as we came up the stairs. That all being said, winterton hospital does have a lot of history and it is a shame to see it left in such a poor state. 
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       


       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
    • By DirtyJigsaw
      All, 
       
      Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too.
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      Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris.
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      The station closed on 2nd September 1939.
       
      Heres afew of my shots i took
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Thanks for looking. 
       
      DJ
    • By Ghost-Scooter
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      #1
      DSC01527-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #2
      DSC01552-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #3
      DSC01547-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #4
      DSC01538-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #5
      DSC01544-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #7
      DSC01534-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #8
      DSC01542-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #9
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