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urbex13

UK RAF Church Fenton, North Yorkshire, March and July 2017

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History

Going to be brief as this is everywhere, I'd recommend rafchurchfenton.org.uk if you're looking for a solid reference on the subject. RAF Church Fenton was opened in 1937, during WWII it had a defensive role protecting the northern Industrial cities from bombing raids. It also hosted the first American volunteer 'Eagle Squadron' during this period. 

Much of its postwar history was dominated by an emphasis on its role as a training airfield and from 1998 to 2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of the year. The site was bought by a local entrepreneur in late 2014 and the airfield now caters for private flights, having been renamed Leeds East Airport. 


 

The Explore


Not much to say here. There's a bit of building going on on some adjacent land, whether this means the airfield owner has more significant plans for the derelict portion of the site I have no idea. All in all despite lots of talk of run-ins with police and security it was a very relaxed mooch, albeit slightly disorientating at points with the overgrown and repetitive nature of everything. There's not a great deal in the way of ephemera or artefacts, just lots of peely paint, first-floor ferns and other fairly natural pretty decay. By and large aside from some new (crap) graffiti very little changed between my visits.


The Pictures


I.

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II.

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III.

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IV.

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V.

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VI.

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VII.

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VIII.

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IX.

 

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X.

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XI.

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XII.

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XIII.

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XIV.

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XV.

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XVI.

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XVII.

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Thanks for looking.


If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line.

Cheers, 

Thirteen. 

 

Edited by urbex13
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Thanks for the update; haven't seen any reports from here for a while :) 

 

Nicely shot and edited too and good to see you back on the forum after some time? :thumb 

 

:comp: 

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Cheers mate :) Yeah quite a few years I think. I've kept myself busy but not bothered to post anything anywhere for a long time! I read about all this photobucket lark and thought I'd have a go at using Flickr for a forum post. I won't leave it so long next time :-D

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