Jump to content
AndyK!

UK Pyestock Anechoic Facility - August 2017

Recommended Posts

The last piece of Pye.

 

I’m sure everyone who visited Pyestock before it was demolished will remember the Anechoic Facility, that one last bit of the puzzle that couldn’t be visited. The blue-tailed building was still in use long after the demolition of the rest of the site, and is the only surviving part of Pyestock’s original host of facilities. This last part of the site has now also closed.


Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @darbians.

 

[IMG]


The National Gas Turbine Establishment.


For those who don’t know, NGTE Pyestock - The National Gas Turbine Establishment - was a huge industrial site in Fleet, Hampshire. The site was used to test jet engines during their development and could simulate the conditions of flight in huge wind tunnels. Large scale expansion took place throughout the 50s and 60s to facilitate the much larger jet engines being developed such as those used on Concorde. The site finally closed in 2000 due to a decline in jet engine development and the advent of computer aided simulations.

 

 

The Noise Test Facility


A lot of research into noise took place at NGTE over the years, and the first anechoic chamber was built in the early 1960s. The increasing demand for quieter aircraft stimulated the more research work, and as a result a larger test facility capable of undertaking large scale noise tests on a variety of gas turbine components opened in the 1970s.

The new facility consisted of two main laboratories, fully independent of each other. These were the Absorber Rig Facility and the Anechoic Chamber facility. The Absorber Rig Facility was the first to be completed and it came into service in the summer of 1972. The Anechoic Chamber Facility was commissioned just over one year later in early 1974.

 

 

[IMG]
The noise test facility in the 1970s before the blue inlets were installed

 

[IMG]
The blue air intakes and associated fans were installed during a refit in the 1990s


The plans below show the general layout of the building. The anechoic chamber is central with silenced air intakes to the left and the silenced exhaust duct and extraction fans to the right. The induced airflow passes through the anechoic chamber where the noise tests were conducted.

 

[IMG]


The Anechoic Facility has a 10,000 cubic metre chamber for noise testing in which the enclosed working volume has nearly zero noise reflection, thereby reproducing environmental conditions which can be compared to those in flight, and permits work to separately identify the source and direction of noise wave phenomena. The building is principally intended for the noise testing of jets, turbines and certain configurations of acoustically lined ducts.

Broadly, the facility consists of an acoustically lined main test chamber 85ft wide and 46ft high with an overall length of 88ft, but which is reduced to 52ft at the working section. The jet flow from the main noise source is projected towards an acoustically lined, flared duct 28ft diameter at inlet with a 20ft diameter throat, which acts as an exhaust inducer.

 

[IMG]
General view of the anechoic chamber with the exhaust duct to the left and working section to the right

[IMG]
View towards the exhaust duct showing fixed microphone towers

[IMG]

[IMG]

[IMG]

[IMG]
View from a hatch at the top of the working section, showing ceiling mounted crane
 
Three observation galleries were positioned around the chamber. Each could be retracted to preserve the room's anechoic properties:

 

[IMG]


The most striking feature of the anechoic chamber itself is the sound reflecting wedges of which there are nearly 7,000 units covering the walls, ceiling and floor. Three individual wedges are mounted together on a base-frame to form each single unit 610mm square; these units are then arranged over the chamber surfaces so that each successive unit has its wedge peak edges at right angles to the neighbouring unit.

 

[IMG]


The working section was modified during refurbishment in the 1990s. A permanent nozzle was fitted through which high pressure air could be blown in using the blue external assembly shown in earlier pictures.

 

[IMG]

[IMG]


Inside the working section the area where jet engines would be positioned was replaced with a network of pipelines feeding the new nozzle.

 

[IMG]

[IMG]

[IMG]
Large air inlet pipe behind the nozzle

[IMG]
The rig room before the refit

[IMG]


The exhaust collector was responsible for transferring the jet engine exhaust gasses and induced air from the chamber to the exhaust silencing structure behind it. It is acoustically treated around its periphery, this lagging consists of heavy density rockwool 8in thick, faced with cotton sheeting and perforated galvanised mild steel sheet. The duct itself is prefabricated from 0.25in thick steel plate and has a total length of 35ft.

 

[IMG]
The exhaust collector

[IMG]
Selfie shows the scale of this huge hole in the wall

[IMG]
Behind the exhaust collector

[IMG]


Air and exhaust gasses then pass into the exhaust silencing structure. The main features of the structure, other than the exhaust collector are the acoustically slabbed walls of the concrete ducts which reverse the flowpath, two sets of silencing exit splitters, high and low frequency, and the ten exhaust extraction fans.

 

[IMG]
Low frequency splitters on the left, and one of the two sets of high frequency splitters on the right. The pole is a fixed microphone boom.

[IMG]
Another selfie showing scale


The fan units themselves are double axial units having two counter-rotating six bladed fans in each pod, both with its own electric motor.

 

[IMG]
One of the two sets of five extract fans, plus one redundant space for an additional fan.

[IMG]


The new arrangement after the refit was particularly suited to testing ducts and propellers. One such item was found boxed up below the working section. This was possibly the last item to be tested at the site.

 

[IMG]


A separate building, houses the control and engineering service equipment. This building has three floors and the heavy service plant was originally installed on the lower floor with the service supplies fed to the rig room via an underground communication duct; the main control room is on the middle floor, while the upper floor houses the ancillary electronic equipment.

 

[IMG]
The control room and Fourier Analyser as originally fitted


The control room was refitted with computerised equipment during the refurbishment in the 1990s. All that remains from the original control room is a single panel, the Plant Controller board.

 

[IMG]
:(

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My jaw just dropped... can you please pick it up for me?

amazing! I love the futuristic look and linework of this place. Also, many thanks for the extensive background information, it makes it more pleasant to scroll through when you actually know what it is you're looking at . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Nikonlover
      Popped out with the new camera yesterday with two friends. Still getting used to it. :D Went to Hi-Finish Castings in Birmingham. 
       
      From what I could find out with paperwork inside the land was bought in 1935 at a cost of £12,000. In between 1935 and 1941 the building was built and an inventory took place in July 1941 at a cost of £25,269. 
       
      Various metals were made for all types of products like wall fittings (Sockets and light fixtures) to car parts(Door handles, wing mirror casing and much more) and they had various clients like Bentley, Ford and Talbot. 
       
      In the early days also Mitchells and Butler where involved in the company. 
       
      Was a great relaxed explore and even though the main factory space was empty (It had some gems) the offices were great. The safe in the toilet had some wonderful paperwork in it detailing the history. What a depressing canteen though. Windows on all sides with a view of a brick wall. Some wonderful gems about if you look though.
       
      Closed in 2008 I believe with a loss of about 42 jobs. Company is no longer about.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Enjoy.
    • By BrotherHoodUrbex
      History
      Margaret Beaven School is a grade II-listed building that was built in 1885 and was designed by Francis Doyle.
      The house was originally called Eddesbury, it was supposedly the last sustainable Victorian house that was built in West Derby.
      It was once occupied by Danson Cunningham a friend of Margaret Beaven who was Liverpool's first woman lord mayor.
      Since the school shut down 13 years ago, the building has been used for filming purposes.
       

       
      It was reported that in May 2018, there was a large fire that ripped throughout the building, we don't know which parts of the building have been damaged as we have not been back since.
       
      Our Visit
      After driving past this place a few times previous to our visit, we decided to have a look online to see if anyone had visited the site before us and unfortunately we came up empty-handed. After realizing this, we took it upon our selves to go down and try gain access, it took us 3 visits before we finally found an entry point. The access point was hard to get through as it was awkward and a tight squeeze.
      The front part of the building is boarded up and is alarmed, we did manage to gain access but the alarm was unbearable so we decided to just leave it. Once we left, we hung around to see if someone would show up and they did. 
      Overall, the explore was well worth it even though we didn't stay to get pictures of the main building.
       



       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Landie_Man
      Another backlog from a West Country Road Trip back in late May with Mookster, our American explorer friend and myself.  This was our second stop off on our first day on the trip; our first being Tone Mills, a revisit for me so I haven't done a report, but with Tone its always a pleasure seeing it.  A wonderful site each and every time.  
      The three of us embarked on the large two day road trip in my trusty 1988 Volvo 240 and rocked up in Torrington that morning.  This site has been derelict for absolutely years, but its in the arse end of nowhere so its taken a while to see it.
      -

      Closed in 1993; Dairy Crest's Creamery sat on a site which had been a creamery since 1874.  This particular Art Deco site was built in the 1930's to meet needs, but When the government de-centralised milk collection,the creamery was finally killed off and it closed its doors; a severe blow to the area; with around 200 Job losses.
       
      #1

       
      #2

       
      #3

       
      #4

       
      #5

       
      #6

       
      #7

       
      #8

       
      #9

       
      #10

       
      #11

       
      #12

       
      #13

       
      #14

       
      #15

       
      #16

       
      #17

       
      #18

       
      More At:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157699243815344
    • By jakeurbexphotography
      On the outskirts of Fishburn lies the derelict Winterton hospital. Winterton hospital used to be very big however most of its buildings were demolished and this part is the only building that remains of it. All of the windows are boarded up however when we got there it looked like someone had pulled the entire doorway off causing the whole thing to open making an entry so easy. Inside the building is in terrible condition, (similar to St. peter's) with collapsed floors, wallpaper peeling, water damage etc. We also didn't realise at the time that the building had asbestos but luckily we had masks so make sure to bring one if you're planning on going inside. We were unable to access the top floor due to the floor being so bad so we only got photos from the corridor as we came up the stairs. That all being said, winterton hospital does have a lot of history and it is a shame to see it left in such a poor state. 
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       


       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
    • By jakeurbexphotography
      Just off the A66 in Darlington, there is an abandoned farm called Little Burdon farm, it has been derelict for at least a decade. It consists of different buildings being from a farmhouse to old barns or stables. There's really two farmhouses, a red brick one and a more modern white house. It also looks like some refurbishment/demolition has taken place but again has been held off or abandoned. The farm was built around the 1830s and is grade 2 listed. There is no security here and is easy to get into all of the buildings. That being said the buildings are indeed derelict so some floors are dangerous and can't be accessed. In the white house building, part of the upstairs floor has been removed due to the refurbishment works but has been left standing as it is.  It also looks like the rooms have been stripped out and all electrics and gas pipes have been removed. 






























×