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    • By The Urban Tourist
      This is a very popular texile factory in Italy. It is very big, it even has a power plant which used to power the whole structure when it was functioning. We stayed there for like 4 hours and managed to explore maybe only 2/3 of the place (or even less)... Entering there was tricky because all the doors has recently been welded (even that one which every explored has used) and the only remaining access was 3 meters from a couple in a car who were doing... nothing, literally. They were just sitting in their car doing nothing... So we had to improvise a little bit. When we got out we almost got spotted by a very slow police car so I layed down inside the cabin at the entrance (I was taking a picture there) and my mate hid himself behind of it. We even heard the police radio a few meters away from us. After a few minutes we saw the car moving away from us, and then we managed to get out.
      That was honestly funny lol
       
      Here is the complete album.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Stevepg
      it looks like this place is being cleaned up or there are squatters; a mate went 3 hours after me and there was a guy on site working; alas someone has nicked all the dildos; vainglorious dickheads have also been on site "tagging"
      still some cracking vintage porn to be seen as well as some great items 
      the guy was sure a hoarder

















































    • By anthrax
      This is one for the history books, I am really unsure how long this factory will stay how it is. It's one of the best, if not the best spot, that I have ever visited. It looked like there had been some vandalism at first when we entered, but in the upper and other parts of the factory, everything looks so untouched, it's unbelievable. 
       
      Full Album (80 pics): https://flic.kr/s/aHsmAYHLXQ
      IG: @ofcdnb
       
      DSC_4831.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4832.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4833.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4837.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4840.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4846.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4849.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4853.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4862.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4871.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4890.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4893.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4895.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4900.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4918.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4928.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4940.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4941.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4942.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4946.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
       
       
       
    • By teddybear
      A trip through an abandoned pig slaughterhouse. Here you can follow the last path of a pig.
      1 round them up
      IMG_1974-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      2 dead pig walking
      IMG_1990-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      3 shocking
      IMG_1994-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      4 beginning of processing
      IMG_1929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      5 cleaning
      IMG_1922-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      6 hair trim
      IMG_1927-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      7 hair removing
      IMG_1973 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      8 waist disposal
      IMG_1967-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      9 chop them up
      IMG_1915-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      10 piece by piece
      IMG_1920-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      11 meat chain
      IMG_1961-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
      12 to the freezer
      IMG_1938-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
    • By Hooismans
      History:
      The origins of the most famous coke plant in the city of Charleroi dates back to 1838, when a coke-fired blast furnace was established along the river Sambre by the newborn company Société Anonyme des Laminoirs, Forges, Fonderies et Usines de la Providence (shorten Forges de la Providence). Although coke ovens were present on site since the beginning, a first modern coke plant was established in 1908 to support the three existing blast furnaces. At the time, the Providence steelworks were amongst the largest in the Charleroi region and whole Belgium too. This favorable positioning was confirmed and improved after a general restructuring occurred between the two world wars. The first phase (1918-21) consisted in the replacement of ancient blast furnaces with five new ones: two at Marchienne and three more at Dampremy. The resulting expanded site was stretching for about 2 km between the Sambre (south) and the Bruxelles-Charleroi canal (north).
      The second phase occurred in the mid 1930s, when an additional blast furnace was built at the Dampremy site along with a large, modern coke plant. The latter (1932-34) was still located at the Marchienne site, slightly to the east of the previous coke plant. Equipped with a battery of 50 Koppers ovens, it had a capacity of 30.000-32.000 t/m and thus was able to satisfy the requirements of the whole site. The two coke plants used to work side-by-side until the early 1950s, when the older one was dismantled and the newer improved. In addition to the original Koppers battery two Coppée ones were built, each one counting 26 ovens. This layout persisted for about thirty years, during which Forges de la Providence merged with several other Belgian steel companies until the creation of Cockerill-Sambre in 1981. The latter controlled all the steelmaking sites in both Charleroi and Liège regions. Being the only one left of its kind in Charleroi, the Marchienne coke plant was improved through the addition of a fourth battery of 20 Didier ovens. This led to an overall capacity of 750000 t/y of metallurgical coke obtained in 122 ovens. Further corporate restructuring led to the creation of Carsid in 2001, which gathered together the last existing primary steel facilities in Charleroi, i.e. the Marchienne coke plant (Forges de la Providence), a sintering plant, a blast furnace and an OMB plant (all three originally belonging to Thy-Marcinelle et Monceau company). Decreasing steel demand plus the obsolescence of inherited facilities made the life of Carsid lasting for just a few years. The coke plant was run down in 2008, leaving the rest mothballed until the definitive closure (2012).
       
      Photos:
       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      I also made a documentary about this place (it has english subtitles)
       
      Thanks for looking!
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