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The_Raw

Italy Villa SS, Italy - September 2017

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An abandoned villa, named SS after the town it resides in. Not much to say really, a waste of a perfectly good house! Not my usual kind of explore if I'm honest but it made a change and kept @Miss.Anthropehappy!

 

 

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Same room but with the balcony doors opened to allow the sunlight in 

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Thanks for looking :thumb 

 

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Nice one. Of course I like the ceilings, but my favorite are the different red colors in the last photo.

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