Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Andy

France Gros Ouvrage Mont des Welches (visited 10/2017)

Recommended Posts

Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. It is located between petit ouvrage Coucou and gros ouvrage Michelsberg, facing Germany. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. After modest renovations in the 1950s, Mont des Welches was abandoned in the 1970s.

Mont des Welches was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in June 1930 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 49 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice.

The comparatively small gros ouvrage comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block, and two combination blocks. It lacks a central "M1" ammunition magazine, and unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of cross galleries between to main galleries, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft).

The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment, commanded by Chef de Bataillon Tari. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2.

 

Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac.

 

 

1

bild01.jpg

 

2

bild02.jpg

 

3

bild03.jpg

 

4

bild04.jpg

 

5

bild05.jpg

 

6

bild06.jpg

 

7

bild07.jpg

 

8

bild08.jpg

 

9

bild09.jpg

 

10

bild10.jpg

 

11

bild11.jpg

 

12

bild12.jpg

 

13

bild13.jpg

 

14

bild14.jpg

 

15

bild15.jpg

 

16

bild16.jpg

 

17

bild17.jpg

 

18

bild18.jpg

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 27.11.2017 at 7:09 PM, The_Raw said:

Some epic shots there mate, much different to what I came away with 

 

Thanks! I look forward to see your photos from there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By bob
      An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji   that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s
      Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
    • By Andy
      The place, called "little Lutece", the ancient name of Paris, was a holiday park with an Asian restaurant, a villa and other buildings.
      Unfortunately, I don't know when it was built, opened or closed.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
      15

       
      16

       
      17

       
      18

       
      19

       
      20

       
      21

       
      22

       
       
       
       
    • By TrevBish.co.uk
      Chateau Sarco – France   Built in the 19th century. Once owned by the ministry and sold in 2008 for just under 4 Million euro and abandoned ever since……
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

    • By Sectionate
      This was our first Metz German Fortification of the day and it did not disappoint. GF L'Yser is filled with murals and paintings, which are incredible and fortunately survive after nearly 100 years. Visited with @flat and a few other non-members

      History:

      The Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, renamed Group Fortification Yser after 1919, is a military installation near Metz that was constructed between 1907 and 1914. It is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and formed part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. 

      During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz.

      Must go back

      Outer fighting block:


      DDE_5447 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5457 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5459 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5462 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      Turreted by Nick, on Flickr

      Main block


      DDE_5494 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5507 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5511 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5528 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5533 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5543 copy by Nick, on Flickr

      The Murals


      DDE_5563 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5506 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5586 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5503 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5588 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5587 copy by Nick, on Flickr
       
×