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    • By AndyK!
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing.
       
      History
      The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day!
       
      The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed.
       
      By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye.
       
      The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped.
       

      Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool


      On the helipad


      View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above


      More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out


      View across the deck


      View in the other direction towards the crane


      Derrick and flare stack


      On the top deck where the drilling happened


      Hook and winch equipment


      The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled


      Heading below deck we find a workshop


      And various plant rooms




      There were various rooms for deployment of workers




      Sick bay


      The workers accommodation was pretty basic


      Central control room




      The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block




      One of the emergency lifeboats


      Sign on the side of the platform
    • By Industrieller
      This area was a powerplant of a coalmine.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
    • By winglessdrone
      Built in 1800s (?) .
      At least 800-900 m2 (?) .
       Large gated garden/grounds.
       Big garage & pool.
       On the banks of the river Seine.
       
       I'd like to know everything about the
       house(/place) what is there to know -
       in details. (My guesses are only estimates. Google Maps & Earth don't
       give much to work with).
       
       Someone could set an expedition on the site ; possibly with a drone ? 
       

    • By JohnnyThunderdrone
      Return to the forbidden area of the catacombs of paris, this time accompanied to get as far as possible, I hope you enjoy it.
       
       
    • By lucan
      not much history to find on this house , somewhere in the midlands
      couldnt get a decent external shot due to the ammount of growth round it,
      the house was one of those prefab jobs made from fibre board containing white asbestos
      i liked the wallpaper in some rooms it was very 1970s
      old nova in the garage and caravan thats seen better times in the jungle of a garden
      bit pic heavy as there was a few bits to see
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      thanks for looking
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