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Explore of the year 2017

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So now is the time you start seeing this type of thread pop up. Favourite cereals, dog walking moments, cheesey tunes etc...

 

Favourite derp should have its place :)

 

For me, this is pretty easy. After a while out of exploring I finally got my feet the taste of mould and pigeon shit they had so desperately been craving. I got out once, nothing crazy, but it was out.

cash and carry 1.png

 

A cash and carry in Leicester.

 

 

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Definitely the explore of the year for me - all the way to County Galway to see an amazing asylum. Almost a fail (as were all the other locations on the list) but to get to spend a few hours in here was totally worth it  :17_heart_eyes: :17_heart_eyes: :17_heart_eyes:

 

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Difficult to decide for one place. But I think it was this little church that I discovered during my UK trip in summer.

 

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Nothing special to most but as a lover of porcelain and with not a lot about anymore this was my fave. Thinking it was just a shed turned out to be pretty good porn :17_heart_eyes:

 

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