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Gromr123

UK Sutton Hospital Block B (The Old Bit) - Surrey - December 2017

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This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck.

I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. 


History

"In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton.

As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital.

In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations.

By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959.

In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991."

 

 

There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. 

 

>Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to 
 doing it properly, but its not an appealing one!

 

>Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one 
 IMO.

 

>Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here 
 but the camera never came out the bag.


Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO.

 

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The Explore

Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups.

We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. 
Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining.

You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. 

A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores!


Photos

 

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Nice one. :) Almost a year to the day after I was in. Certainly an interesting little block. The basement of C was cool - the art department. 

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1 hour ago, hmltnangel said:

Nice one. :) Almost a year to the day after I was in. Certainly an interesting little block. The basement of C was cool - the art department. 

 

Did you get any pictures?

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Nice one dude, some good decay in there. I prefer seeing shots like these than too much fisheye if I'm honest, you went a bit crazy with that mofo for a while :P 

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Thanks man, I'm actually trying to ween myself off the fisheye lens. Its great for certain shots, but not every single shot haha. 

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2 hours ago, Gromr123 said:

Thanks man, I'm actually trying to ween myself off the fisheye lens. Its great for certain shots, but not every single shot haha. 

 

Yeah I hear ya, it just captures SO much though, I couldn't put mine down for a few months after I bought it. Barely use the thing now but occasionally it pulls out the money shot :27_sunglasses:

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