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UK Fisons Fertilisers, Ipswich. March 2017

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Another one from early last year. A nice mix on the same site this one with the awesome old wooden part next to a burned out, vandalised, graffiti strewn new part. It brought into sharp contrast the difference between a interesting and unique explore with loads to see and photograph and a wreaked, empty and mostly uninteresting burned out shell. The feeling of enjoyment and satisfaction I got from both was definitely different. I found it an interesting experience in this mad hobby we do. Visited with non member Paul.

HISTORY

The Old Fisons site was originally the location for the first ever complete superphosphate factory. In the mid 19th century, the increasing demand for new effective fertilisers for agriculture led to a search for a substitute for crushed bones, the traditional source of fertiliser. Edward Packard discovered that the use of fossil dung, found across East Anglia, contained high levels of phosphate, the ideal base for fertiliser.
Between 1851 and 1854, Packard built a warehouse at Paper Mill Lane and pioneered the production of artificial fertilisers for horticulture on an industrial scale. 

It was an ideal site due to the combination of the River Gipping, which was navigable by barges between Ipswich and Stowmarket from the late 18th century onwards, and the addition of the railway line in 1846 which both provided the means to import raw materials and export fertilisers.

Edward Packard was joined in 1858 by Joseph Fison who constructed his chemical works opposite the North Warehouse. The lower two floors of this iconic warehouse date from this time and were used for bagging and storage and are identified on early Ordnance Survey maps as the Eastern Union Works, proving the North Warehouse was purpose-built and directly associated with the production of superphosphates.
The factory shut its doors in 2002 and has remained empty ever since. 

 

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Thanks for Looking :thumb

 

All the best for the New Year :)

 

More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157678463886994/with/33624996416/

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A couple of bits look just like millennium mills with those spiral chutes. Some decent graff as well, don't mind so much if it's executed well in a place that's a bit fucked anyway

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