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Hi all,

 

Some pictures from "Bureau Central"
Hope that you will like these ones

 

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Alway worth a trip. I was there three times between 2010 and 2017.

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    • By AndyK!
      I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it.
       
      A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly.
       

       
      History
       
      The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel.
       
      In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished.
       

      The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use
       
      One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region.
       
      Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year.
       
      Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless.
       
      Bureau Central
       
      Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire.
       

      Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh?


      The interior has seen better days


       

      Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors


       

       


      The Blast Furnaces


      Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952


      Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard


      Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces


      Base of one of the blast furnaces


      Inside a blast furnace building


      Inside another blast furnace building


      Spiral staircase


      Exterior with the water tower in the distance


      View up a blast furnace


      Wagons under a blast furnace


      The blast furnace control room had been modernised
       
      Turbo Blower House and Workshops
       
      The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s.


      Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2


      There was one blower set for each blast furnace


      Side view of the huge blowers


      Turbo-fan 3


      The green motor for fan 3


      Historic control panel from when older machines were used


      The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago


      Newer control room for the turbo-blowers


      Turbo-blower control room


      Workshop area


      Workshops


      Locker room
       
      Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area
       
      The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks.


      Wagons parked in the delivery station


      Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind


      Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks


      Blast furnace and wagons


      Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below

      Steel works
       
      The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel.


      Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952


      Sign in the steelworks


      View along one of the many long sections


      View down the steelworks


      View in the opposite direction


      Work area between machinery


      Ladles lined up in the ladle bay


      One of the ladles tipped up


      Wider view of the ladles


      One of the work bays


      Another work bay


      Crane lowered in one of the bays


      Furnaces for melting iron and scrap


      Track for moving ladles


      Electromagnetic lifting gear
       
      Rolling Mill
       
      The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms.


      Plant in the rolling mill


      Plant in the rolling mill


      Lifting gear in the mill


      Crane hooks in the mill


      Tracks leading to mill equipment


      Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
    • By DirtyJigsaw
      All, 
       
      Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too.
      I wont bore you any longer, but heres some history of the station stolen from Google
       
      Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris.
      The station was closed on 2 September 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation with a lot of traffic passing through, but was eventually closed again as a result of its proximity to the neighboring station of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis, which lies only 100 metres away.
      In the past, the station served to shelter homeless persons, and the eastern section of the location is currently used as a day shelter for the homeless (managed by the Salvation Army).
       
      The station closed on 2nd September 1939.
       
      Heres afew of my shots i took
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr
       
      Thanks for looking. 
       
      DJ
    • By Lavino
      Methodist hall
       
      Methodist central halls were grand buildings that used to attract thousands of people when the temperance movement was at its strongest. The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Participants in the movement typically criticize alcohol intoxication or promote complete abstinence (teetotalism), leaders emphasizing the sinfulness of drinking as well as the evil effects on personality, family life. Ironically over the years many have been sold off, with some now used as bars and nightclubs.
       
       
       
      The Methodist Central Hall, Located in Corporation Street, Birmingham, England, is a three storey red brick and terracotta Grade II* listed building with a distinctive tower at the northern end of Corporation Street, opposite the Victoria Law Courts. It is located within the Steelhouse Conservation Area.
       
      The terracotta was manufactured by the renowned firm of Gibbs and Canning Limited of Tamworth, which also produced decorative works for 179-203 Corporation Street and the interior of the Victoria Law Courts in Birmingham along with the Natural History Museum in London.
       
      The street level has twelve bays of shops (four with their original fronts). The building also runs along Ryder Street and has more original shop fronts.
       
      It was built 1903-4 by architects Ewan Harper & James A. Harper at a cost of £96,165.
       
      Its main hall seats 2,000 and it has over thirty other rooms including three school halls.
       
      In 1991, the Methodist Church was converted into a nightclub; however, this venture closed in 2002.
       
      The hall was re-opened on 14 September 2007 as the 'Que club.' The opening night was hosted by 'Drop Beats Not Bombs'. On re-opening the club has seen extensive repairs and improvements to its decor, and regularly hosted events such as Atomic Jam and Fantasia.
       
      The site has remained empty since 2016 and has fallen into a state of disrepair in recent years and has had vegetation growing out of the upper floors, prompting Historic England to add it to its 'Heritage at Risk’ register.
       
      The building has been the subject of proposals to be converted into an office building. The first of such was submitted in 2001, only to be withdrawn. Planning applications to convert the building into apartments have also been rejected by Birmingham City Council on the basis that original internal features would be destroyed. However, the council has since given planning consent to a proposal to convert the building into apartments. It is to be referred to the Local Government Office.
       
      In 2017 it was reported that the Methodists Central hall is set to be transformed into a new £35 million hotel and leisure quarter with a rooftop bar and restaurant.
       
      London-based property investor Ciel Capital has unveiled plans to transform the Grade II*-listed Methodist Central Hall into a leisure complex with a hotel, apart-hotel and a mix of retail and food units.
       
      DSC_3288 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3289 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3290 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3269 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3267 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3270 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3272 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3277 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3278 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3279 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3280 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3281 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3284 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3287 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3258 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3261 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      DSC_3282 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
    • By zombizza
      I know this place has been done many times before but it is right up my alley and was a tantalizing temptation whilst the rest of the family slept/swam in the villa pool.
      Thanks for the tip from a fellow member here. The last report/intel from here was 2014 so it has been a while.
      Things have changed security wise. The holes are patched up and there are 2 new heras style fences inside the main boundary. The main problem with these was that the point of tackling them was very exposed to the street  and adjacent dock.
      Inside, not much has changed.
      The 'slot window' access point was amusing, the width being about an inch narrower than my back to chest distance and the height being about 4inches shorter than my groin to shoulder height. It took some contorting, and at one point I thought I was well and truly stuck, but in the end, I managed-I was too close to give up.
       
      6am start meant it was a bit dark for photography. By the time I got out, the families were on their balconies and I yelled Ola to them as I jumped over the 4th and final barrier to safety.
       
      It was constructed in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún.
      Running gear and T/G were provided by Metropolitan Vickers.
      In 1986 The Spanish government commissioned a new Powerplant around 10km away on the other side of the bay. 
      The plant was closed in 1991/2.




       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       



       

      The 2 rooms I really came for-

       



       



       



       



       



       



       


         
       
       
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