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UK Cellars clough mill, Huddersfield - September 2017

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History 

 

The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. 

Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. 

Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves.

 

Explore

 

We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. 

 

Pics

 

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Bad video pics 

 

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The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 

 

But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...


 

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    • By AndyK!
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      A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly.
       

       
      History
       
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      The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use
       
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      Bureau Central
       
      Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire.
       

      Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh?


      The interior has seen better days


       

      Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors


       

       


      The Blast Furnaces


      Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952


      Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard


      Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces


      Base of one of the blast furnaces


      Inside a blast furnace building


      Inside another blast furnace building


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      Exterior with the water tower in the distance


      View up a blast furnace


      Wagons under a blast furnace


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      Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2


      There was one blower set for each blast furnace


      Side view of the huge blowers


      Turbo-fan 3


      The green motor for fan 3


      Historic control panel from when older machines were used


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      Newer control room for the turbo-blowers


      Turbo-blower control room


      Workshop area


      Workshops


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      Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area
       
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      Wagons parked in the delivery station


      Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind


      Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks


      Blast furnace and wagons


      Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below

      Steel works
       
      The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel.


      Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952


      Sign in the steelworks


      View along one of the many long sections


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      One of the work bays


      Another work bay


      Crane lowered in one of the bays


      Furnaces for melting iron and scrap


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      Electromagnetic lifting gear
       
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      Plant in the rolling mill


      Plant in the rolling mill


      Lifting gear in the mill


      Crane hooks in the mill


      Tracks leading to mill equipment


      Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
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