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The George Hotel is Grade ll Listed building famous as the birthplace of rugby league football in 1895. The 60 bed hotel was built in 1851 and closed in January 2013, looking for a new buyer. The three-star rated George Hotel, which has an Italianate façade was designed by William Walker.

 

The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift.

The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread...

 

      Exterior 

 

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Bar

 

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Main lobby
 

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Stair case shots

 

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Corridor shots

 

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Bed rooms

 

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The caller 
 

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The ball room and dinning hall

 

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The kitchen 

 

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The roof

 

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Other rooms

 

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45 pics later...

Hope you enjoyed...

 

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Pretty nice that is @little_boy_explores:) 

 

Must've been a tricky one due to the location? Thanks for posting, enjoyed looking at these and by pure chance i'll be up that way next week with work :) 

 

:comp: 

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Lovely looking building that and some nice features on the inside too. I quite like it :) I haven't seen this before either,  thanks for sharing :thumb 

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Speaking as a fan of rugby league, I do hope this place gets taken over by someone who puts their money where their mouth is.

So far its still in decent nick obviously - there's some lovely features and you got some nice detail shots too. 

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