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    • By .Gh0ast
      First report here, the well-known Chateau wolfenstein.
       
      Lost somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes, the castle was built 1931 by a rich Baron.
      It has many use throught the years, hospital, command centre during the war, care home for soldiers and, apparently some kind of jail for war and politic prisonners.
       
      Now, it 's still a part a the hospital complex but it is unused, except for a room where the hospital stocks some servers.
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By teddybear
      This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany.
      This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown.
      The  only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites.
       
      IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
       
      IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
    • By Sectionate
      This was our first Metz German Fortification of the day and it did not disappoint. GF L'Yser is filled with murals and paintings, which are incredible and fortunately survive after nearly 100 years. Visited with @flat and a few other non-members

      History:

      The Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, renamed Group Fortification Yser after 1919, is a military installation near Metz that was constructed between 1907 and 1914. It is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and formed part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. 

      During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz.

      Must go back

      Outer fighting block:


      DDE_5447 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5457 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5459 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5462 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      Turreted by Nick, on Flickr

      Main block


      DDE_5494 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5507 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5511 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5528 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5533 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5543 copy by Nick, on Flickr

      The Murals


      DDE_5563 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5506 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5586 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5503 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5588 copy by Nick, on Flickr


      DDE_5587 copy by Nick, on Flickr
       
    • By Ghost-Scooter
      A few weeks ago I visited an old abandonend chocolate factory in the south-west of Germany. The rainy day normally suits the shabby mood of the environment but of course requires long exposure. Unfortunately I forgot to turn off steady shot (camera shake compensation) so 50% of my pics turned out to be blurry. 😖 Shit happens!
       
      #1

      Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #2

      DSC01819-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #3

      DSC01822-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #4

      DSC01860-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #5

      DSC01861-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #6

      DSC01868-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #7

      DSC01864-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #8

      DSC01866-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #9

      DSC01863-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #10

      DSC01867-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #11

      DSC01834-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #12

      DSC01851-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #13

      DSC01823-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #14

      DSC01849-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #15

      DSC01856-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #16

      DSC01857-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #17

      DSC01858-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #18

      DSC01854-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
       
    • By Peterchen
      When Robert Montgomery showed his exhibition "All Palaces" in Berlin in 2012, probably few have expected how limited the time of the Stattbad will be and how right he should be with his light sculpture "All Palaces are Temporary Palaces". Four years later, the location, once known internationally for music, art and culture, has already been demolished.
       
      Designed by the architect Ludwig Hoffmann and inaugurated in 1907, the bathhouse was initially used by numerous factory workers in the area, as the tenements were then equipped without showers and bathtubs. There was a large pool for the men and a small one for the women. During the Second World War, the main building was badly damaged, but rebuilt in the 50s until the bathing operation was discontinued in 1999.
       
      After a short vacancy, the STATTBAD Wedding was reopened with the exhibition "No more sugar for the monkeys" and quickly gained a prestigious reputation. As an event location, the building attracted numerous artists through its preserved 60s aesthetic. On the upper floors there were permanently used ateliers, the two dry-laid pools were used for exhibitions, concerts and parties, the best known being the STATTNÄCHTE with its numerous well-known Djs.
       
      The photos shown here were taken in mid-May 2015, shortly after the closure due to a lack of building security measures. Jochen and his coworkers did not suspect that day that they had already left their last working day in this place behind. Meanwhile, only the curtain wall of the building remains, but new palaces are planned here, probably student apartments.
       
      More pictures of this huge location can be found here -> http://www.patrick-hertel.de/stattbad/
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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