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Villa Scorpio

 

History

 

Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse.

 

Our visit


Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos!

 

Externals

 

 

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Internals

 

 

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22 hours ago, hamtagger said:

That's really stunning, what a beautiful place :17_heart_eyes:. Excellent photos too :thumb 

 

It was! Crazy to think it's been left like that. Thank you! :5_smiley:

5 hours ago, little_boy_explores said:

That place is beautiful 

 

and you have some good photos too 

 

Nice report :thumb

 

It was indeed! Thank you very much :12_slight_smile:

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On ‎12‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 7:46 PM, Dubbed Navigator said:

What a beauty of a place! full of win.

 

You have captured it really well :)

 

Thank you very much :D 

On ‎22‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 4:05 AM, Andy said:

Really nice pics of a beautiful place!

 

Thank you :) 

On ‎15‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 11:38 PM, The_Raw said:

That last room is a bit special, like that a lot! 

 

It was indeed :) Thank you!

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19 minutes ago, a World in Ruins said:

Very beautiful villa this and fab photographs Kat Kat ???

 

Thank you very much! You need to get yourself down to Italy, you'd love all the villas there :5_smiley: :5_smiley:

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11 minutes ago, obscureserenity said:

 

Thank you very much! You need to get yourself down to Italy, you'd love all the villas there :5_smiley: :5_smiley:

After Telegraph, Scorpio it is! ????

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19 hours ago, a World in Ruins said:

After Telegraph, Scorpio it is! ????

 

Sweet! We'll jump on a quick flight over from Manchester airport next week then :10_wink::4_joy:

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