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The Ark Synagogue, Liverpool. Also known as Greenbank Synagogue.

 

History -

 

Quote

This abandoned grade 2 listed synagogue was built in 1936/1937 and was designed by architect Ernest Alfred Shennan. Built in a rare Art Deco design it features a standard brick-faced façade but has distinctive tall vertical windows. The synagogue closed in 2008 after serving the local Jewish community for over 70 years as the congregation merged with another local synagogue. The synagogue was given upgraded grade 2 status and features on the Heritage at risk register. Future plans include conversion of the building into sheltered housing for the Jewish community, however t, is scheme is likely to be abandoned in favour of the sale of the building to a third party organisation. 

 

My visit -

 

I visited this site recently with two friends that I run the facebook page 0151 Outdoors with, if you are on facebook, give us a like!

 

Well, I dont really know if this can be classed as a report, haven't had too much luck on my first few explores, but I'm not letting that stop me.  This time, I arrived on site, and took a few pictures of the exterior before two dodgy blokes of possibly eastern european descent came running around the corner, shouting about how the building is ''TOP SECRET''

 

They weren't too frightening, so I grabbed a few pictures as I walked off the grounds, the guy in the last picture told me as I was leaving, ''£10 pictures outside, £20 pictures inside'' but I think I'd rather try again in future, its part of the fun. I dont know how true it is, but apparently the building is now owned by a man from Pakistan, and a lot of bits from inside have been removed.

 

Anyway, these are just a couple of the pictures I took of the exterior, shame I didnt get inside as it looks interesting on other peoples reports.

 

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46 minutes ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

£10 for outdoor pictures :8_laughing::8_laughing:

 

They were ridiculous, told us that a lot of the stuff has actually been removed due to the current owner and then tried to charge us ??

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Its always nice to see an update and it doesnt look like much has changed exterior wise since I visited in 206 except for the fact that there is now someone selling entry through the backdoors for pics inside :roll:

 

I have removed the last pic as some people can get a bit funny about themselves being put on the internet without their permission. Could cause problems for ya mate :thumb 

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Seems to be attracting the wronguns. Not really surprising but a shame as it's a stunning place especially inside, and I thought it had a really nice peaceful atmosphere when I was there. 

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I tried to get in twice, the last time it was being stripped out and most of the contents burnt.  It was being converted into something too.  This was about 2016, 

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