Jump to content
little_boy_explores

UK Tithe Barn St Christian Centre, Wakefield - September 2017

Recommended Posts

History

 

Horbury had a chapel of ease to the Church of All Saints in Wakefield, from before the time of the Domesday Book. The chapel was replaced by a Norman chapel with a nave and tower that stood until it was replaced by the present church in 1790. St Peter and St Leonard’s Church, the parish church, was designed by John Carr, the Horbury born architect who built the Georgian neo-classical style between 1790 and 1794 at a cost to himself of £8,000. He is buried in a vault beneath the north aisle. The foundation of St John’s Church at Horbury Bridge was in a mission meeting in a room in what is now the hairdressers in 1864. Funds were raised and the church was built with stone from Horbury Quarry in 1884. The curate, Sabine Baring-Gould wrote the hymn “Onward Christian Soldiers” in 1865 for the Whitsun procession to Horbury Church. Another mission was set up at Horbury Junction in 1887 and St Mary’s Church was built in 1893. The Methodist Church on High Street was demolished. The Salvation Army corps has headquarters on Peel Street and the Tithe Barn Christian Centre is on Westfield Road.

Tithe Barn Street in Horbury was so named after the old tithe barn, which was used to store produce of the tithe. A tithe means a tenth and one tenth of every Horbury parishioner's income from produce of the land had to be donated to the church. The right to receive tithes was granted to the English churches by King Ethelwulf in 855. These tithes were taxes, which each inhabitant was compelled to pay. Horbury was a Chapel of Ease to Wakefield Parish Church, and the Vicar of Horbury was a Curate in Charge. The tithes which were collected from Horbury residents belonged to the Vicar of Wakefield and not to the Vicar of St. Peter's, Horbury.

 

Explore

 

By chance we discovered this one on route to Wakefield... The exterior is in good condition and from what we understand the building became abandoned in 2011 after various businesses one including a day nursery had re-located. The interior is pretty heavily vandalised and lots of precious metals & items have been taken... this said theres no real structural damage and was able to negotiate round without any real danger. The main hall of the church still as some original features including coving found typically in a church, unfortunately no pews or alter remain although there was a cool seating area above the main hall. There was also an area round to the rear probably an extension at some point to deal with the volume of people... which had kept some of its original features... quite a nice easter egg this one!

 

Pics

 

Txyzava.jpg

 

icjThOe.jpg fRE8JfU.jpg

 

0SzB7ju.jpg SoqoTNx.jpg

 

S8WFdUb.jpg 3MdqWSj.jpg

 

1502884_38435bd2e5bf3db096abc5b3b1cad53d

 

Today the Christian Centre lays more vandalised than ever...

 

still worth a wonder in my opinion :thumb

 

 

Edited by little_boy_explores

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By jones-y-gog
      This is where Henry lived with his wife Mary and their only child, a daughter. Mary died a long time ago and Henry had to move in with his daughter who looks after him. He is 98 years old. After much persuasion he finally agreed that this, the family home must be sold. 
       
      Henry was a hard-working man with strong moral principles. He's been a prominent member of his local chapel all his life. Among his paperwork includes a certificate dated January 1940 confirming him on the register of Conscientious Objectors. Interestingly he must have had to attend a formal interview to justify his beliefs so had written prepared answers based on questions he thought the authorities might ask, along with character references.  Also there was a letter dated September 1976 congratulating him on 25 years service to the BBC as a gardener. 
       
      This is not just an abandoned house - its a home. In this home are meaningful and treasured possessions but also a home full of memories. This was a sanctuary from the outside world, a place to lead a simple life. 
       
      [Note - I wrote the above in 2017]
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
    • By lucan
      not much left , not vandalised and loads of decay and bird poo and dive bomming  pigeons,
      been closed a few years now 
      on with the pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      thanks for looking
       
    • By AndyK!
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing.
       
      History
      The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day!
       
      The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed.
       
      By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye.
       
      The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped.
       

      Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool


      On the helipad


      View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above


      More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out


      View across the deck


      View in the other direction towards the crane


      Derrick and flare stack


      On the top deck where the drilling happened


      Hook and winch equipment


      The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled


      Heading below deck we find a workshop


      And various plant rooms




      There were various rooms for deployment of workers




      Sick bay


      The workers accommodation was pretty basic


      Central control room




      The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block




      One of the emergency lifeboats


      Sign on the side of the platform
×