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UK Dobroyd mill, Huddersfield - February 2018

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Dobroyd mill

 

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The history

 

Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from  English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.  Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use.

 

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The explore

 

The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill.  The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too.  

 

The pics

 

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Welcome back :wink:

 

It's a nice little place this and i'm glad to see it's still on the map. Seems like more and more gauges and dials are disappearing every time I see it! 

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Quality the place looks huge and it has a similar glass topped roof to page field mill in Wigan.

I like pondering the history of these places, so many people have been and gone... Its a shame they go to waste really.

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On 28/02/2018 at 11:05 PM, The Urban Collective said:

I like pondering the history of these places, so many people have been and gone

 

A similar thought process I had about a lass at the weekend :3_grin:

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